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Royal Artillery (WWI and WWII) Vet

I am looking to see if someone can put a name to this ribbon bar...

 

Royal Artillery Colonel from WWII who was Great War Veteran

1) Military Cross w/ Rosette (2x)

2) 1914 Mons Star w/ Rosette (not 1914-1915 Mons Star)

3) British War Medal (WWI)

4) WWI Victory Medal 

5) 1945 Defense Medal

6) War Medal 1939-1945

7) Efficiency Medal 

Thanks for any help.  Any additional information would be welcomed.

54A344ED-5A3F-49A7-B322-99EBBFF47FD9.png

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First things first:

Whoever he is he is wearing the World War 1 Victory Medal which seems to be US medal. He is wearing the War Medal 1939-1945 and the Defense Medal which was both instituted when World War 2 was all intent and purpose well and truly over. So from that we know he survived both World Wars. Why isn't he wearing the World War 2 Victory Medal like he obviously does with the World War 1 medal?

I'm going to make an uneducated assumption so if I'm wrong, gentleman, please correct me: during World War I he was ''on loan'' to the Americans for a specific period or task which entitled him to wear the World War 1 Victory Medal. ALL the medals displayed on this bar is British so I'm working on the assumption he was a Brit. As the original poster stated by World War II he is a colonel so he might be working at the British High Command or somewhere where he does not get transferred or come into contact with his US counterparts which explains the lack of the World War 2 Victory Medal.

 

 

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Quite an impressive ribbon. That number will be critical in either finding your man, or confirming his identity once you narrow your search down by slogging through the archives at Kew. The number itself is a bit of a puzzle. Is it 1090 ? Or 16905 or...? I think it’s traceable, but it’ll take some detective work. Start with the London Gazette Archives. Good luck!  
Mike 

By the way, Wessel, the Victory Medal was not an American medal exclusively.

 

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Mike,

I know the WW2 Victory Medal wasn't exclusively American but as I said I just find it weird that he wore a WW1 Victory Medal plus a couple of medals dated at the end of WW2 but not the WW2 Victory Medal. I figure if he was proud enough to have survived 2 World Wars he would have worn both Victory Medals. 

 

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Wessel, the WW I Victory medal was a multi-national medal which is discussed at great length in its own section of this site. The WW II victory medal, however,  was a US medal, and would not be worn on the uniform shown above. There’s no reason to suppose that the Colonel was attached to any American Outfit. 
Mike. 

Edited by Mike McLellan

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The bar to the MC - double winner - may narrow it down a bit.  The second rosette simply indicates that the ribbon it is on is for the 1914 Star, not the 1914-15.  The Territorial Medal suggests that he 'stayed involved' between the Wars, so a secondment to a staff position for en elderly officer who may not have finished the Second War [ hence no WWII Victory?] seems reasonable.

BTW, officers were not given service numbers before 1920.  And I think an officer's serial should be 6 digits, not 5 [and 8 for ORs].

 

 

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Peter monohan wrote: "BTW, officers were not given service numbers before 1920.  And I think an officer's serial should be 6 digits, not 5 [and 8 for ORs]."

Actually officers serial numbers after 1920 ('P' numbers) went from single digit to six digits. 'P1' was the serial number of EC Lloyd.

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On 14/11/2019 at 23:49, Gunner 1 said:

Actually officers serial numbers after 1920 ('P' numbers) went from single digit to six digits. 'P1' was the serial number of EC Lloyd.

Thank you, Gunner!  I looked that up but clearly not in the correct place. :(  My [very limited] expertise is with Canadian Great War records, when officers did not have numbers at all, and the 19th century British system [ditto].  I suspected British officers must have gotten the serials between the wars but didn't double check my source.  My bad.

Peter

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