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Hi all, 
This man was in Dragoner-Regt 22 and later served in several flying units during WW1. I was wondering if anyone knows his date of birth and what awards he earned? 

Thanks a lot, 
Matt. 

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Posted (edited)

Hi Andy, 
Thanks for your reply - I am very pleased that you confirmed the BMV4x, which is new information for me. 
So far then he is the only WW1 pilot whose awards match those being worn by the man in this photo. 

I have also included a wartime photo of Rittm Wulf for comparison. 

Matt. 

LW Maj01.jpg

Wulf.jpg

Edited by Mattyboy
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Hi P.F., 
Thanks for the extra career info. I would just like to add that a helpful member of another forum informed me that the sixth medal on his uniform is the Prussian lifesaving medal. 
Also that the wartime photograph of Josef Wulf comes from the website buddecke.de. 

Matt. 
 

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Hi Matt

Except the awards mentioned above he also received Fz.Abz on 04.12.1913 (should been replaced later on by the Err.Abz), EKII, EKI, RKr Löwe IIKl mit Schw, Öst MVKr III.

I dont knew regulations for wearing awards during WW2, but when the Err.Abz was instituted it was forbidden the wear earlier normal flying badge. The earlier badge should actually be "left back" to the authorities and if you was awarded the ErrAbz you could only wear this.

Gunnar

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Hi OvBacon, 
Thanks for the additional photos of Wulf. :)

Hi Gunnar, 
Thank you for confirming the AH award. This makes it more likely that it's him, although he should be wearing the retired aviator's badge as you say. 

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3 hours ago, Soderbaum said:

aha, Erinnerungsabzeichen for flyers

Gunnar

Hi Gunnar,

thanks!

Typically WIKIPEDIA (German) got it wrong again (in parts). They state that the Erinnerungsabzeichen was not issued in WW2. Which is wrong. It was issued until 12th January 1944. On the photo Matt. posted you see him with his old Flugzeugführer-Abzeichen from 1913 and the one from 1935. The latter was issued to (among others) "denjenigen Soldaten und Beamten der Luftwaffe, denen vor oder im Kriege das Flugzeugführer- oder Luftschifferabzeichen verliehen worden ist." verliehen werden, "wenn sie jetzt noch zu dem zum dienstlichen Fliegen verpflichteten Personal gehören." oder an Personen, die "zur Ausfüllung ihrer Dienststellung als Flugzeugführer auf K-Flugzeugen fliegen müssen."

So if ever he qualified for the Erinnerungsabzeichen he must have gotten it after his transfer to Wehrbezirks-Kdo Gelsenkirchen in July 1942.

Best,

GreyC

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