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Peppe864

St.George Cross 4th class

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Hi Guys!

I don´t know anyhting about imperial russian order, medals or badges. I would like to ask you guys some things.

Is this an original cross?

What time period is it from, pre or post 1900?

Can you somehow find out who the recpient was with help of the number?  86327

DSC09393.JPG

DSC09394.JPG

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Хрущель Станислав — 64 пех. Казанский полк, ефрейтор.
Пожалован Государем Императором через командированного в 1-ю армию Генерал-Адъютанта князя Белосельского-Белозерского за отличие в боях.

Khrushel Stanislav - 64th Kazan infantry regiment, corporal. 

Awarded by the adjutant-general prince Beloselsky-Belozersky for the distinction in battles.

Безымянный.jpg

 

1 hour ago, Peppe864 said:

What time period is it from, pre or post 1900?

Somewhere around 1915.

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Thanks for the help guys! 😃

 

highly appriciated

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Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, paul wood said:

 Looks Ok WW1 period

 

Paul,  you gotta be kidding me :catjava:

Edited by JapanX

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How about these?

s-l1600 (92).jpg

s-l1600 (91).jpg

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I guess they look bad and nobody wants to say so.  They are not mine so you will not hurt my feelings.

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Yes, these are fakes.

For example 

 

8.jpg

 P.S.

9 hours ago, dond said:

... nobody wants to say so.  

I am a rare visitor of this section.

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Thanks for the reply.  BTW these all look fake to me.  I could make them in my garage.

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 Sounds like you have quite a garage there.

mdgk1.jpg

mdgk3.jpg

mdgk4.jpg

mdgk5.jpg

mdgk8.jpg

mdgk3.jpg

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Posted (edited)

 

2 hours ago, dond said:

Thanks for the reply.  BTW these all look fake to me.  I could make them in my garage.

 

1 hour ago, JapanX said:

 Sounds like you have quite a garage there.

... which brings us back to this story (found elsewhere on GMIC), which illustrated to me just how low-tech you can be and still produce 'acceptable' fakes (made in a garden shed, apparently),

https://www.derbytelegraph.co.uk/news/derby-news/derby-fraudster-made-thousands-selling-4208225

Thanks for posting the fascinating pictures of what I assume is an Imperial Russian mint, JapanX.

Edited by Trooper_D

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53 minutes ago, Trooper_D said:

... I assume is an Imperial Russian mint, JapanX.

Yes, St.Petersburg mint in the process of making St.Gerge crosses back in 1915.

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