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I recently was able to bid for a schaper naval oberver's badge. From the feedback I've received on the Wehrmacht awards forum, it looks to be good. I received it, along with a twin brother today, and would appreciate opinions.

The twin brother is named "Meyr, II M Flug??." I must admit I know very little, and I certainly would not have bid had it not been for the very good price. Now I'm enjoying doing the research, and would appreciate any help or leads.  

1.jpg

2.jpg

3.jpg

A.jpg

a1.jpg

b.jpg

b2.jpg

B4.jpg

 

 

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Hi Garfield

I really like these Marine aviation badges. 

It is difficult for me to read the inscription for the second badge, but a strong candidate is StabsArzt(at that time) Alfred Meyra gen Meyr who received his badge on 05.07.1915. At this time he did fly within SFS (See Flugstation) Helgoland which was a part of II Marine Flieger Abteilung with base at Wilhelmshaven. He was born 27.05.1885 in Konstanz. He was later shot down, shortly captured but died of wounds as commander of SFS Duingi during 1917. He was "angestellt" within the Marine on 27.10.1915 as Kptlt dR MA mit Patent 22.03.1914.

II M.F.A was renamed to II SFA at an unknown date in 09.1915. Btw, anyone who knew the exact formation date for II MFA/SFA ? I do think it was 25.10.1914 but so far I have been unable to find confirmation.

Gunnar

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garfield3,

The first one looks like a nice badge, similar to the one from Carsten Baldes book 'Aircrew Badges and Honor Prizes of the Flying Troops from 1913 to 1920'. A type 2 on page 476.

The second one I am unsure, it does not have the upper loop on the reverse of the crown.

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Thanks for the opinions and info! The upper loop seems to be a feature missing on some, and present on others when it comes to schaper badges? 

I've attached below a somewhat better photo of the inscription of the second. How common would it have been for an awardee to have more than 1 badge (purchased privately)?

Interesting that Kptlt dr Alfred Meyra/Meyr was from Konstanz. The badges were purchased on an online auction site from a bicycle dealer (they sell bikes and bike parts on their account, this was the only collectible item being auctioned off). The seller being located in Northern Switzerland. There was a 3rd badge at auction also from that seller, but I was too late to bid. Pictures of it are below also. Any chance these could have all been from the same man?


Meyr1.jpg

c3.jpg

 

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Posted (edited)

The  circumstances of his death are a little bit strange. He was not shot down during the flight. He was shot down during a gun battle on ground. He died the day after.

As mentioned on WAF he was a former navy doctor who changed to the navy air service.

I would expect a silver Schaper badge because he was one of the first receipts of the observer badge, but none of the badges are in silver.

kind regards Alex

Edited by jaba1914

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19 hours ago, Soderbaum said:

Hi Garfield

I really like these Marine aviation badges. 

It is difficult for me to read the inscription for the second badge, but a strong candidate is StabsArzt(at that time) Alfred Meyra gen Meyr who received his badge on 05.07.1915. At this time he did fly within SFS (See Flugstation) Helgoland which was a part of II Marine Flieger Abteilung with base at Wilhelmshaven. He was born 27.05.1885 in Konstanz. He was later shot down, shortly captured but died of wounds as commander of SFS Duingi during 1917. He was "angestellt" within the Marine on 27.10.1915 as Kptlt dR MA mit Patent 22.03.1914.

II M.F.A was renamed to II SFA at an unknown date in 09.1915. Btw, anyone who knew the exact formation date for II MFA/SFA ? I do think it was 25.10.1914 but so far I have been unable to find confirmation.

Gunnar

Where is Duingi?

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Romania about 40km South to Konstanta at the Tuzla lake.

Kind regards Alex

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As I mentioned on the 'other site', these badges are very scarce, especially attributed examples, so a great find. I am also a bicycle collector, so I'm sorry I missed this auction.

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Outstanding, thanks! It's great to read some more information about the piece possibly belonging to Alfred Meyra/Meyr.

Given that 3 pieces were sold by the same seller, what would be the chance that these were all from the same person? I know with WW2 German awards, it wasn't uncommon for awardees to have multiple examples. Would this have been the case in WW1?

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Given the circumstances of this auction, I would say very likely all are from the same individual. From my own personal experience, my uncle had multiple examples of his badges for wear on several uniforms. Too bad about the third badge getting away, it is a rare variant. In any event, a great pair.

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