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No dynastic or regimental connection. However, as mentioned in other threads, there are numerous ways for seemingly random pairings to happen. I know of several hundred awards of the MMV2 to men of all ranks in Grand Ducal Hessian regiments just from those that were published from 1914 to 1917 in the Regierungsblatt, which are only a fraction of total MMV awards. These were typically Mecklenburg natives in those regiments. You also have Hessians in Mecklenburg units, and Hessians in the navy who may have received Mecklenburg awards. 

One curious case is this: on 10 January 1915, 20 officers were commissioned as Leutnants der Reserve in Füsilier-Regiment Nr. 90, but were not sent to that regiment. Instead, they were sent as officer replacements to Alexander von Linsingen's newly-formed Südarmee. Several of these officers ended up in the heavily Hessian 48. Reserve-Division, so as officers in command of Hessian troops, they could have received the HT as well as the MMV2.

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1 hour ago, Dave Danner said:

No dynastic or regimental connection. However, as mentioned in other threads, there are numerous ways for seemingly random pairings to happen. I know of several hundred awards of the MMV2 to men of all ranks in Grand Ducal Hessian regiments just from those that were published from 1914 to 1917 in the Regierungsblatt, which are only a fraction of total MMV awards. These were typically Mecklenburg natives in those regiments. You also have Hessians in Mecklenburg units, and Hessians in the navy who may have received Mecklenburg awards. 

One curious case is this: on 10 January 1915, 20 officers were commissioned as Leutnants der Reserve in Füsilier-Regiment Nr. 90, but were not sent to that regiment. Instead, they were sent as officer replacements to Alexander von Linsingen's newly-formed Südarmee. Several of these officers ended up in the heavily Hessian 48. Reserve-Division, so as officers in command of Hessian troops, they could have received the HT as well as the MMV2.

Thanks !

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The most obscure and least discussed way a soldier could acquire such a combo involves his mother.  If the soldier was Hessian because of his father's citizenship but his mother was born a Mecklenburger, the soldier has the right to apply for and receive citizenship from Mecklenburg.  The soldier, who now has dual citizenship, could then apply to receive the EK2 equivalent from Mecklenburg... the Mecklenburg-MVK2.  So if the name of a soldier is known and an award like your MVK2 is on his medal bar for no logical reason, you could try to find out the birthplace of his mother on Ancestry.com or Geni.com. Simi.

Edited by Simius Rex
Was advised to change "Mecklenburgian" to "Mecklenburger"
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Posted (edited)

I wish I had his mothers name ! 
I ordered it . It’s kind of an odd combo I could not resist ! And no honor cross so a WW1 period bar I assume ? I keep thinking I’m done with medal bars but I keep getting sucked in !

Edited by scottplen
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16 minutes ago, scottplen said:

I wish I had his mothers name ! 

Like I mentioned above, all you really need is the soldiers name and as much information about him as possible but sometimes only his name is available.  In the case of your bar, provided you knew the soldier's name, you could check-out all the people with that name from Hesse on Ancestry or Geni and who also served in the military during WW1.  Then you would see who his mother was under his profile and you could investigate her background.  Does the dealer know the soldier's name to whom this bar belonged???  I seriously doubt it unless it came with a document grouping.  Simi.

Edited by Simius Rex
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Nice bar.  I like it.  It's assembled in the typical and very well known "Dresdner-Stil" which was first introduced by G. A. Scharffenberg and then adopted by firms such as Brookmann and Westmann and others based in Saxony.  Note the gathered-box-pleated ribbons (seen best on the reverse) and the unique way the ribbons are folded and overlapped on the obverse. The unique pin & catch set-up are also typical of Saxon bars and were used by the Saxon firms right up until the end of WW2.  Simi.

Edited by Simius Rex
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