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PLEASE HELP !! BRITISH WW1 M.C. AWARD To U.S. ARMY MEDICAL CORPS OFFICER


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Hello Gents, Here's a brief update regarding the process I've managed to make pertaining to this Officer. I haven't been able to upload the relevant war diary pages yet for the dates in question, but hopefully I'll get them added in the immediate future. Although I haven't learned everything about his stint with the RAMC, I did however learn the following facts, both via British 33rd Field Ambulance, WW1 War Diary, Year of 1918.

 1 )  On 25 April 1918, Lieutenant. A. O. Raymond reported for duty at QIIA85 

2 )  On 29 September 1918, Lieutenant. A. O. Raymond, M.O.R.C., USA proceeded at 4:15 pm today to report to O/C 7th South Staffordshire Debt for duty - vice Capt. Clark, RAMC wounded. Location noted was Cherisy, O26d86, Sheet 51B

 

        Well, at least I'm moving along somewhat, but reading through those War Diary pages can become quite tedious ! ( Imagine If they were actually searchable ? ) Now, I would like to learn when & how he arrived with the 33rd Field Ambulance, as he didn't show up there until 25th of April 1918. If he arrived vin the U.K. during February 1917, where was he for over a year ? I know he had duty with some Orthopaedic unit soon after arriving, but I don't think he would have remained with them for that length of time ? I'm certain that Medical Officers of were desperately needed by that period over in France & Flanders, right ? 

 

                                     Best,    Dom P.  /  dpast32

Hello Gents, Here's a brief update regarding the process I've managed to make pertaining to this Officer. I haven't been able to upload the relevant war diary pages yet for the dates in question, but hopefully I'll get them added in the immediate future. Although I haven't learned everything about his stint with the RAMC, I did however learn the following facts, both via British 33rd Field Ambulance, WW1 War Diary, Year of 1918.

 1 )  On 25 April 1918, Lieutenant. A. O. Raymond reported for duty at QIIA85 

2 )  On 29 September 1918, Lieutenant. A. O. Raymond, M.O.R.C., USA proceeded at 4:15 pm today to report to O/C 7th South Staffordshire Debt for duty - vice Capt. Clark, RAMC wounded. Location noted was Cherisy, O26d86, Sheet 51B

 

        Well, at least I'm moving along somewhat, but reading through those War Diary pages can become quite tedious ! ( Imagine If they were actually searchable ? ) Now, I would like to learn when & how he arrived with the 33rd Field Ambulance, as he didn't show up there until 25th of April 1918. If he arrived vin the U.K. during February 1917, where was he for over a year ? I know he had duty with some Orthopaedic unit soon after arriving, but I don't think he would have remained with them for that length of time ? I'm certain that Medical Officers of were desperately needed by that period over in France & Flanders, right ? 

 

                                     Best,    Dom P.  /  dpast32

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Hey Gents, Here's a bit of information that I recently happened across, & thought that perhaps someone here may be interested in it. It is relevant to this particular Post, so I figured it would be ok to share here. The data can e found within an article pertaining to U.S. Army Physicians in British service during WW1. It's titled; [ PDF] Yanks in the King's Forces: American Physicians serving with the British Expeditionary Force During World War - (AMEDD) Historyh istory.amedd.army.mil › wwi › A... ) . On page 33, it notes that 173 U.S. Army Physicians received the Military Cross for their service with British Forces. I have over the years observed a few varying totals for M.C.'s to Americans in WW1, but I have never encountered this 'Physicians only' total. ( IIRC, Abbott & Tamplin report a grand total of 320 or so awards to U.S. Personnel. )  Even if the M.C. data wasn't included in this 'treatise' of sorts, I believe it's well worth the read. Has anyone ever encountered this U.S. Doctors only' M.C. total ? Any comments will be appreciated. THANKS Guys,

 

                    Best,    Dom P.  

 
 
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Dom

Thank you for posting the link to what looks like a fascinating paper, which I have saved for later reading. I suspect that, once it has been digested, it will give us much better insights into what seems to be a little known aspect of Anglo-American cooperation during the Great War.

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THANKS 'Trooper-D' !   Included below are a few interesting article & texts pertaining to U.S. Medical Personnel assigned to U.K. Forces. Although only an 8 page article, it too is well worth the read. And lastly, I have tracked down an older, 1926 pub. concerning over 1,500 American Physician's WW1 service with  the RAMC.  ("The Lost Legion", by Dr. W. A. R. Chapin ) Unfortunately, I haven't been able to locate a direct LinkI to it, so therefore have to access it via 'Hathi Trust', which I'm honestly not all that pleased about.  But, it stil is well worth the added effort to access it !! ( I have attempted to purchase a used copy, but not at $200 USD !! ) Just for the record, the U.S. Army's CMH has published an exhaustive series covering all the assorted operations of the War, everything from overseas transport to medals & decorations. The U.S. 'AMMED' also has a complete Website devoted to Military Medical subjects, & I feel it's definitely well a look.

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015039349421&view=1up&seq=11

%22ARTICLE - %22U.K. & U.S. MEDICAL RESERVE CORPS IN WW1%22 ( 8 Pgs, 2018-1-Wood ) .pdf

 
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Thank you for the link to 'The Lost Legion'. What a shame it doesn't have an index! However, the search function indicates that there were no mention of our man in the text. He does appear in the Roll of Honour, however, which shows the names of the 1,500 who served.

Interestingly, where appropriate, the MC (and other decorations earned) is shown as a post-nominal, giving an indication of how many were awarded,

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015039349421&view=1up&seq=413

The page linked to belowe shows the abbreviations used in the book for decorations awarded, showing the range of British decorations awarded to these American doctors (one tiny quibble, it lists the MC under 'Decorations for Valor', whereas we have identified that it wasn't awarded exclusively for bravery),

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015039349421&view=1up&seq=432

Thank you, also, for the link to the pamphlet 'The Army Medical Corps Reserve in World War I'. Those who prefer to read it on screen, rather than downloading it,  maybe interested in this link

https://alphaomegaalpha.org/pharos/PDFs/2018/Winter/2018-1-Wood.pdf

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I just contacted both of his local Libraries, Brockton where he was born, & Worcester where he worked & resided for much of his life. Hopefully either of them will be able to dig up his Obituary for me ? I have searched long & hard but just can't seem to find it, nor for his wife either. Well, tomorrow is another day so I'll keep at it !! I wish I could Copy & Paste the 118 pages of Awards Roster from 'Lost Legions', but I fear I may have to actually print it out !! Ouch, I see my new ink cuts draining away already ! Oh well, it's better than buying the book. Take care,

 

                                                      Best,       Dom

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Hello Gents,   Just in case anyone happens to be interested, & or following my progress here, I have finally managed to obtain a copy of 1st Lieutenant Raymond's Obituary, which I have to say is quite complete ! Just when think you're all done, there's usually at least one more piece of the puzzle still to be found. THANKS Guys,

                 Best,   Dom P.  /  dpast32@aol.com

#359 Raymond obituary pt1.jpg

#359 Raymond obituary pt2.jpg

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Thanks for posting what is, perhaps, the final piece in the puzzle. This has been an interesting thread which has thrown a much needed light on the role of American volunteer medics in France before the official entry of the USA into the Great War.

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THANKS Trooper D,  Yes, I was very happy to receive this Obituary, especially due to it pretty much confirming what we've learned already. Now I'll just pick up a period manufacture RAMC Officer's Service Dress Cap Badge to add to his display, & I'll be able to call him complete. I will say though, it's really nice being Retired, as I now don't have to wait for my days off to fit in my research, in between all the other household duties of course. THANKS AGAIN for all your assistance with this one, I really appreciated it. Take care,

 

                Best,   Dom Pastore Jr.  /  dpast32@aol.com

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