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Here is a recent purchase from a Saxe-Weimar soldier from WW1.

 

They consist of:

• Iron Cross II Class (Prussia)
• Military Order of St. Henry Silver Medal (Saxony)

• Merit Medal Wilhelm Ernst Bronze (Saxe-Weimar)

• Friedrich Cross (Anhalt)

• IX Years Service Medal (Saxe-Weimar)

 

The Military Order of St. Henry Silver Medal has a makers mark for F.U. (Friedrich Ulbricht).

 

Sadly no knowledge of the original  owner, but this is a delightful group!

 

Stay Safe!

2CC7F7ED-FAF9-4839-B83D-81FAD433FEA2.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Langers said:

Here is a recent purchase from a Saxe-Weimar soldier from WW1.

 

You purchased it from a Saxe-Weimar soldier from WW1?  Those Saxons have remarkable longevity.  A daily diet of Saxon yoghurt is their secret, I believe.     

 

I am sorry to have to tell you that every single ribbon installed on this bar was fabricated WELL after 1945.  In other words, it is a modern creation.  I think a ribbon-identification tutorial is in order in light of the other medal bar that you posted several weeks ago.  If you are going to collect these bars, and you don't want to get stuck with repros, you need to be able to identify weft and warp threads AT THE VERY LEAST.

 

You can post a photo of the back of the bar if you wish, but the front has already conveyed the essence of the matter.  (The medals themselves, however, look fine.)

Edited by Simius Rex
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Here is a quick review of what a period-original medal bar's ribbons must look like in order to be genuine.  This doesn't mean that a modern bar can't be assembled using original ribbons.  That requires a careful analysis of materials, technique, backing, devices, etc. and that kind of capability comes from years and years of experience.

 

Photo #1 below shows a period-original ribbon.  Study the 2 edges carefully.  A diagram of this ribbon's weft and warp weave-pattern can be seen in photo #2. 

Ordensband RAO.jpeg

Warp_and_weft.jpg

Edited by Simius Rex
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22 minutes ago, Simius Rex said:

 

You purchased it from a Saxe-Weimar soldier from WW1?  Those Saxons have remarkable longevity.  A daily diet of Saxon yoghurt is their secret, I believe.     

 

I am sorry to have to tell you that every single ribbon installed on this bar was fabricated WELL after 1945.  In other words, it is a modern creation.  I think a ribbon-identification tutorial is in order in light of the other medal bar that you posted several weeks ago.  If you are going to collect these bars, and you don't want to get stuck with repros, you need to be able to identify weft and warp threads AT THE VERY LEAST.

 

You can post a back of the bar if you wish, but the front has already conveyed the essence of the matter.  (The medals themselves, however, look fine.)

I bought it for the medals, not the bar. I collect medals, not ribbons. 
 

 

10 minutes ago, Simius Rex said:

Here is a quick review of what a period-original medal bar's ribbons must look like in order to be genuine.  This doesn't mean that a bar can't be assembled using original ribbons.  That requires a careful analysis of materials, technique, backing, devices, etc. and that kind of capability comes from years and years of experience.

 

Photo #1 below shows a period-original ribbon.  Study the 2 edges carefully.  A diagram of this ribbon's weft and warp weave-pattern can be seen in photo #2. 

Ordensband RAO.jpeg

Warp_and_weft.jpg

Thanks for the tip. 

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1 minute ago, Langers said:

I bought it for the medals, not the bar. I collect medals, not ribbons.

 

Unfortunately, that is not the impression you communicated.  When you stated that "Sadly no knowledge of the original owner, but this is a delightful group" it implies that the bar is unattributed.  I do not believe that a random assemblage of medals suspended from a modern medal bar could possibly have an "original owner" in the sense that experienced collectors use that term.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Simius Rex said:

 

Unfortunately, that is not the impression you communicated.  When you stated that "Sadly no knowledge of the original owner, but this is a delightful group" it implies that the bar is unattributed.  I do not believe that a random assemblage of medals suspended from a modern medal bar could possibly have an "original owner" in the sense that experienced collectors use that term.

Oh shut up and bugger off. 
 

Stop gate keeping and get over yourself. 

Edited by Langers
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5 hours ago, Simius Rex said:

 

Unfortunately, that is not the impression you communicated.  When you stated that "Sadly no knowledge of the original owner, but this is a delightful group" it implies that the bar is unattributed.  I do not believe that a random assemblage of medals suspended from a modern medal bar could possibly have an "original owner" in the sense that experienced collectors use that term.

Attitudes like this is exactly what is wrong with militaria and military history followers; it’s too inaccessible, too elitist and too semantic. 
 

I won’t bother here on this site anymore. 
 

Stay safe and take care all.

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I think your reaction is out of line and childish to say the least. Simius Rex was being very respectful and only trying to help. Is it really "too inaccessible, too elitist and too semantic" to try to be historically accurate? That is the raison d'etre for forums like this to exist. You obviously showed this bar hoping for a fawning "ooh, aah" reaction from other members. When you didn't get it and your lack of basic knowledge was quickly exposed, you made the absolutely inane and silly response of "I collect medals, not ribbons". (What medal collector doesn't collect ribbons?). If you're intent on leaving the forum after only 41 posts because you can't accept the truth, while unfortunate, it's no great loss to any of us. Obviously, based on your reaction, you're not interested in history but only in accumulating shiny things like some magpie.

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