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Guest Darrell

Partisan Medals - 1st and 2nd Class

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Guest Darrell

These guys are what I deem as "Dangerous" line of work. Behind enemy lines. While some got these for being the leaders of Partisans and not for actually fighting ... regardless .. they were behind enemy lines where capture meant CERTAIN death ... not that the regular captives had a much better time :unsure:

Post 'em folks :beer:

How about a 1st Class awarded to Savely Lukitch Grischenko May 18, 1949:

Edited by Darrell

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Guest Darrell

Next the second Class.

Awarded to Victor Ivanovitch Kuleshov on December 01, 1947.

The Medal:

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ohh here we go again!!! :jumping::jumping::jumping: I will post mine tonight when I get home!!! :jumping: We had might as well do the "Defense of", "Capture of", and "Liberation of" medals as well... one at a time!

Beautiful documented examples Darrell! I have a solitary undocumented second class as well. Great example Riley!

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:jumping: Darrell, WOW!!! :jumping: Very nice 1st & 2nd Class with documents!!!

:beer: Doc

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Guest Darrell

ohh here we go again!!! :jumping::jumping::jumping: I will post mine tonight when I get home!!! :jumping: We had might as well do the "Defense of", "Capture of", and "Liberation of" medals as well... one at a time!

I think if you look back at some of the first posts .. there are already threads for these. Come to think of it .. maybe for this one too :blush:

Edited by Darrell

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I think if you look back at some of the first posts .. there are already threads for these. Come to think of it .. maybe for this one too :blush:

I thought of that as well. I will look up the threads before starting a new one...

Here is my Partisan Medal, Second class..

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Guest Alanirvine

[attachmentid=37087]

My contribution,

Alanirvine

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The reason why the son's book is in such nice condition is that he was killed during the War... :love:

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I guess that it could be said that when it came to Partisan medals, he was what we would call a ?double dipper.? Here we have his temporary award certificate issued by Ukrainian Headquarters of Partisan Movement for his 2nd class medal

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and here is the same for his 1st class medal which is signed by Col. Orlov, commander of Independent Special Purpose Unit of USSR NKGB.

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A kind of interesting sidelight is that his Victory medal document

is, as I understand it, signed by Lt. Gen. Milshtein, chief of USSR NKGB

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Hey WC! Now that's an extremely nice & interesting group that screams RESEARCH ME!!!!!!!

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Thank you very much for the compliment, Stogieman. I certainly agree with your research recommendation, although these NKVD/KGB types often prove to be rather difficult. Also, I need to get in touch with a good source for this type of work. Thanks again, glad you enjoyed it.

Best wishes,

Wild Card

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