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Major Ernst Heinrich Anton August von Bodungen (gestorben 1878)


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Good afternoon,

 

I am looking for the ODM and careerdata of Ernst Heinrich Anton August v. Bodungen, retired prussian Major of HR8 / 31. LIR. Trying to complete the mans bio, he started his career as a kurhessian officer.

 

Any help greatly appreciated 🙂

 

Thanks a lot

David

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David, 

This is just about the extent of what I have been able to find so far. 

 

1806: Fähnenrich

-        Regiment Graf Wartensleben (No. 59.)

1811: S.-Lt. im 7. Infanterie-Regiment m. A.-U. dim.

1817: 8tes Husaren-Regiment (1stes Westphalen)

-        Aggregirt: Pr.-Lt. von Bodungen.

1818: “

1819: “

-        Aggregirt: Pr. Lt. von Bodungen, com. Beim Landwehr-Regiment 30 a.

o   30stes Landwehr-Regiment, 1stes Triersches – 2 tes Bataillon – Cavallerie

1820: “

-        Aggregirt: Pr.-Lt. von Bodungen

1821: “

1822: “

1823: “

1824: “

1825: “

-        P.-Lt. von Bodunden vorläuf. mit Inactivitäs-Gehalt

 

 

After 1825, I need to do further research, however, I wasn't able to find his name in either of the rangeliste for HR8, Regiment Graf Wartensleben (No. 59.), or LIR Nr. 30 and 31

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David,

 

his rather brief entry in the regimental history of HR 8:

 

Bodungen.thumb.jpg.dab1383f9f7bcffdc2c31b1ffb4c8f2b.jpg

 

He was incorporated into the 2nd battalion (Mühlhausen) of 27. Landwehr-Regiment on 12 June 1826 and promoted to Rittmeister on 17 September 1827. The Mühlhausen Landwehr-Bataillon became the 2nd battalion of Landwehr-Regiment 31 in 1830. Ernst von Bodungen was promoted to Major in the cavalry permanent cadre (Besoldeter Stamm) of his battalion on 22 March 1843 and retired on 20 August 1844. The cabinet order of 5 February 1850 belatedly granted him the permission to wear the cavalry uniform of the 31. Landwehr-Regiment with retired insignia. He died on 26 June 1878. The only decoration shown in his final entry in the Prussian Rang-Liste (1844) is the officers' long service decoration.

 

Regards

Glenn

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Great info both of you. Many thanks! With your help we Just lifted another former kurhessian officer out of obscurity.

These details will be added to what I already found on him and soon be put on my website

 

kurhessen.owlstown.net

 

Its still growing and it will be a multiple years project to get it all complete. But with all of our passion for militairy history, I am sure it will be a great succes and eventually a valuable resource for these interested in pre-1866 german history.

 

Thanks again

 

David

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On 06/08/2022 at 08:25, Glenn J said:

David,

 

his rather brief entry in the regimental history of HR 8:

 

Bodungen.thumb.jpg.dab1383f9f7bcffdc2c31b1ffb4c8f2b.jpg

 

He was incorporated into the 2nd battalion (Mühlhausen) of 27. Landwehr-Regiment on 12 June 1826 and promoted to Rittmeister on 17 September 1827. The Mühlhausen Landwehr-Bataillon became the 2nd battalion of Landwehr-Regiment 31 in 1830. Ernst von Bodungen was promoted to Major in the cavalry permanent cadre (Besoldeter Stamm) of his battalion on 22 March 1843 and retired on 20 August 1844. The cabinet order of 5 February 1850 belatedly granted him the permission to wear the cavalry uniform of the 31. Landwehr-Regiment with retired insignia. He died on 26 June 1878. The only decoration shown in his final entry in the Prussian Rang-Liste (1844) is the officers' long service decoration.

 

Regards

Glenn

I read about this retired insignia a couple of times. What does it look like?

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David,

 

initially from 1830 retired officers with permission to wear a uniform wore an epaulette without the crescent. In 1833, the same insignia as active officers was introduced, however with a special epaulette "Bridle"  (Passanten) of black and white "zig-zag" patterned lace. This from Paul Pietsch's "Formations und Uniformierungs-Geschichte"

 

11 and 12 show the 1830 epaulette boards of a Premier-Lieutenant and Oberst respectively.

 

13 shows the 1833 epaulette bridle lace.

 

Regards

Glenn

 

a.D..jpg.952311bc986e974ca1216a8343ae11eb.jpg

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