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On 18/05/2006 at 08:52, NavyFCO said:

Since we have a thread on American Awards to Soviets in WW2, I thought I might start a thread about the reverse. I can't go into too much detail here (it's already a 9 page article -without photos- for the JOMSA) but I thought that at least I could give some numbers and a little bit of data.

A rough numerical breakdown is as follows:

Award Name - Army - Navy

Order of Suvorov 3rd Class 1 - 1

Order of the Patriotic War 2nd Class 24 - 27

Order of the Red Star 10 - 28

Order of Glory 3rd Class 1 - 45

Medal For Valor 2 - 25

Medal For Military Merit 5 - 25

Gents, 

  In the 14 years since the original post above, online access to the Russian MOD archives now allows for greater precision regarding the above awards.  Documented awards to U.S. Army personnel are thus revised upwards as listed below:

Order of Suvorov Third Class - Four

Order of the Patriotic War Second Class - 57

Order of the Red Star - 14

Order of Glory Third Class - 16

Bravery Medal/Medal for Valor - 17

Combat Services Medal/Medal for Military Merit - 21

Regards,

slava1stclass

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RedMaestro,   Thank you for your response.  You can also look forward to my planned fourth book which, like the first three, will address in great detail elements of the same subject.   Rega

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"Slava," thank you for the update. Since this is an aged thread overall, it bears noting here (as mentioned elsewhere) that Dave Schwind's outstanding book Blue Seas, Red Stars has documented awards to American naval personnel in detail. Another of our fellow members is currently working on an extensive article about awards to Army personnel that will surely provide us with an even more accurate count (higher total than the above). In one exchange, for example, 60 Legions of Merit / Bronze Stars to the Soviet Army were reciprocated with 60 awards to the American Army ranging from Combat Service Medals to the Order of Suvorov 1st Class.

Some awarding decrees are not available through the archive portals. Reliable contacts in the archives have indicated that some physical copies also could not be located. 

Cheers,

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20 minutes ago, RedMaestro said:

"Slava," thank you for the update. Another of our fellow members is currently working on an extensive article about awards to Army personnel that will surely provide us with an even more accurate count (higher total than the above).

Cheers,

RedMaestro,

  Thank you for your response.  You can also look forward to my planned fourth book which, like the first three, will address in great detail elements of the same subject.  

Regards,

slava1stclass

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