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Fine !

Could you please give details of this book (ISBN, publisher, title).

Thanks.

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http://www.insellbooks.com/books/1654121.html

"This book is the first Russian-language edition of the award system by one of the most neglected countries in Europe - Albania. It is the result of many years of studying reward system Albanian communist period. In it, as the background of the premium system, a brief historical sketch. Awards described in some way unique in that for nearly half a century of existence of the same medals were produced alternately in the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, East Germany, Poland and Albania itself. The book is an analysis of evidence for the identification awards made in those countries. Besides the description of awards, given by the head of the investigation of the role of Yugoslavia in the premium system in Albania. Shows the degree of influence on the premium system unchallenged leader of the communist country's Enver Hoxha. The application received a great informational material, including the original documents on the manufacture of awards in the USSR, indicate broad collection costs awards to date."

Cost me 25 USD to get it to Germany via online order.

207 pages, color pics, not a "huge" format book, but I do suspect there's a ton of info in here (for those with Russian skills...) which is not yet known on this forum.

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Thank you very much, I'll try to order it direct from Russia. :beer:

Edited by Georg14

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Have taken a bit more time to walk through the book and also now able to post some pics.

First off, it appears to offer a real wealth of information about Albanian awards and benefts from - what appears to be - a combination of Russian and Balkan based authors.

207 pages in total, unfortunately (for most of us) entirely in Russian:

  • introduction pages (incl. an undoubtedly interesting section discussing parallels between Albanian and e.g. Soviet award system
  • quote a lot of (color) photographs to liven things up
  • extensive and directionally exhaustive review of all familiar orders/medals with their different types, and based on the quantity of text there surely must be (I hope) more information included here than known before
  • various pages with interesting lists
  • AND... probably the most valuable piece of the book... scans of documents from the Soviet archives, I suspect about the purchase by Albania from the Russian mint of the earlier, Russian made, orders/medals... including information on quantities (produced, not awarded)... wish I could read Russian!
  • also a rarity or price guide which provides a useful indication of which orders/medals all include a USSR made variant
  • and finally bibliography, etc.

All in all a book which appears to be pretty thorough and detailed and with probably interesting information contained in it... for the Russian reader!

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2014/post-679-0-99086200-1395869810.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2014/post-679-0-39335100-1395869835.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2014/post-679-0-26435600-1395869850.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2014/post-679-0-07799200-1395869867.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2014/post-679-0-42409700-1395869881.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2014/post-679-0-90076000-1395869897.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2014/post-679-0-42612500-1395869917.jpghttp://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2014/post-679-0-72705500-1395869932.jpg

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Would be great if a Russian speaker could take some of the key datapoints (especially from the scans of Russian archives about volume of awards manufactured there) and translate them here on the site.

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Only today received the book. First impressions: very interesting book with good illustrative but sometimes not good quality (maybe I got a bad one). Unfortunately there is no final data about quantity and concrete by manufacturers, only some data about Soviet production.

Documents presented in "addition" - correspondence about rejection of batchs of a few orders/medals received by the Moscow Mint (there made ​​the final part of fabrication and assembly) from Krasnokamsky Mint (it produced only stamping, bleaching and soldering) in 1945-46, that does not represent the total number of awards finally sent to Albania. Technical descriptions of the production operations.

Otherwise comfortable tables of the time of establishment of awards, place of manufacture, rank, ribbons and original names.

If you have any questions, please describe interests and pages.

Best regards. :beer:

Edited by Georg14

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So do the numbers given in the book of Soviet produced pieces by krasnokamsky mint correspond at least rudimentarily with those from sammler.ru?

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As expected, data shown in the book and info on the website are quite different.

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"...numbers given in the book of Soviet produced pieces by krasnokamsky mint correspond at least rudimentarily with those from sammler.ru?"

In sept.1945 Krasnokamskiy Mint received an order for(numbers given in the book):

ORDER OF THE FLAG/Urdhёri i Flamurit 400 pcs,

ORDER OF LABOR/Urdhёri i Punёs 1000,

MEDAL "REMEMBRANCE 1942 - 1943"/Medalje "Kujtimi 1942 - 1943" 5000 pcs,

MEDAL FOR BRAVERY/Medalje Per Trimёri 6000 pcs,

ORDER PARTIZAN STAR/Urdhёri Ylli Partizan 1 cl. 1050,

2 7600,

3 6800.

You can compare for yourself ... But maybe there were additional orders, because the USSR produced(for Albania) some other medals too.
Given the fact that later orders for manufacturing were placed in Poland, DDR and of course their own production, the numbers must be much higher !

Edited by Georg14

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FROM MY COLLECTION

ALBANIA - ORDER OF FREEDOM 3rd CLASS

MADE by IKOM ZAGREB.

 

z.ARTAN LAME, FALEMINDERIT PER INFORMACIONIN NE LIDHJE ME SHENJEN ME SIPER.

12036993_486140088260043_7021134732996924353_n.jpg

10431493_486140108260041_5917025757353569691_n.jpg

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