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Guest Darrell

US Service Medals from Civilian and Military Goverment Agencies.

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Guest Darrell

g. Closeups.

Edited by Darrell

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Guest Darrell

h. Ribbon Bar and Lapel Pin:

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Thanks for that!

I recently developed an interest in the old US Medal of Freedom; a plastic cased version like yours was recently on e-pay but of course I lost. It's one of those things I'm still p!ssed about.

That medal wasn't awarded as much as the current version is. By the way, do you think that a cased Medal of Freedom is probably one that was awarded? I'm wondering if there were surplus stocks as with some military medals.

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Guest Darrell

.....By the way, do you think that a cased Medal of Freedom is probably one that was awarded? I'm wondering if there were surplus stocks as with some military medals.

Hard to say. Unusual in the fact that the carboard carton and protective sock still remains intact. Something that makes it all the more special.

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Hard to say. Unusual in the fact that the carboard carton and protective sock still remains intact. Something that makes it all the more special.

Are these covered by the "stolen valor" laws like military medals are?

I bet that the Medal of Freedom is not easily found.

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They originally were awarded as an order similar to the Legion of Merit, often to foreigners, for things such as helping downed US airmen to escape, etc.:

1. Gold Palm, equivalent to the Legion of Merit, Chief Commander

2. Silver Palm, equivalent to the Legion of Merit, Commander

3. Bronze Palm, equivalent to the Legion of Merit, Officer and Legionnaire.

4. Without palm, equivalent to the Bronze Star Medal, When awarded to citizens of the United States, it was awarded without palm.

Here is a Commonwealth grouping with it:

sirwilliamstephensonxr1.jpg

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Guest Darrell

As Mike has already posted, but a little larger pictures:

US Navy Distinguished Achievement in Science Medal

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Guest Darrell

Kinda off the beaten path, but I am not going to collect all the State National Guard Medals (that is a given).

However, here are a couple from Texas that I thought would fit in here nicely anyway.

Texas National Guard - Desert Shield_Desert Storm Campaign Medal

Obverse:

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Guest Darrell

Texas National Guard - Purple Heart Medal

This medal is awarded to members of the Texas National Guard inducted into federal service on or after September 11, 2001, and who meet the award criteria for the Federal Purple Heart Medal. It differs from the Federal Purple Heart in four ways; the Alamo has replaced George Washington's family crest, the Great Seal of the State of Texas has replaced Washington's bust, it is two piece construction versus three piece of the Federal Medal, and a white stripe has been added to the ribbon.

Obverse:

Edited by Darrell

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Guest Darrell

Environmental Protection Agency - Superior Service Medal

Seems to be the hardest of the EPA medals to find now days. This one makes the full set of four ...

Obv.

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Guest Darrell

Federal Emergency Management Agency Medal

NOTE* On this medal, the ribbon is incorrect. The story goes that when Lordship went out of business, they had several of these old Peurto Rican Ribbons hanging around that they fashioned onto a bunch of FEMA Pendants, selling them off in the process. Whether that is 100% true will likely never be settled. The correct ribbon will be posted after this medal.

Edited by Darrell

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Guest Darrell

Correct Ribbon. Small but the color is evident.

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Guest Darrell

Department of Defense - Office of the Inspector General - Distinguished Service Medal - Type III

New US Department of Defense Inspector General Distinguished Civilian Service Medal (Type 3). The Type 1 was designed in 2000, but was redesigned in 2005 with a new coat of arms on the obverse, creating the type 2 medal. The medal was redesigned again in May 2008, with another modified coat of arms, creating the type 3, the currently issued medal.

Obverse:

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For Darrell - Army Meritorious Civilian Service Medal

This is the one we PM'd about - thanks for the help!

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Guest Darrell

For Darrell - Army Meritorious Civilian Service Medal

This is the one we PM'd about - thanks for the help!

Thanks Chet, looks great :cheers:

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  • Blog Comments

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