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Guest Darrell

This one arrived today. Completes the entire "Making Babies" Set :unsure:

This is a decently low Serial Number Variation 1 - 15897 (crica 1947-48).

Obverse:

Edited by Darrell
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  • 1 month later...

Seen a number of Mother Heroine Orders with large rivets - mostly on ebay. As far as i know it none of the Mother Heroine Orders have large protruding smooth silver rivets. Could it be some budding entrepreneur out there? Or is it something I am missing? Will post a pic of them next time i see one.....

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Here is a fake mother heroine medal with large rivets and no serial number and a genuie one to compare.

But there are different variants of mother heroine medal witk different position of the rivets and different mint mark stamps.

Edited by Alfred
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Here is a fake mother heroine medal with large rivets and no serial number and a genuie one to compare.

But there are different variants of mother heroine medal witk different position of the rivets and different mint mark stamps.

Agreed. The riveted version I was referring to is in fact the one on the right and my belief was that it was fake. I have even seen it serial numbered once. Good to have it confirmed though.

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Another thing to watch out for:

There is a guy at the Tbilisi flea market who pops the gold stars off the MH and replaces them with the star from a Miner's Glory medal. Then he melts the gold star down. He even has the nerve to sell the now-damaged Miner's Glory medal alongside the now-fake MH. I've seen it with my own eyes. Of course, short-term visitors to Tbilisi take them home as (full price) souvenirs and I'd bet that some must have made into the wider market by now.

Just thought you might like to know.

Chuck

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  • 8 years later...

Question: I recently purchased a Soviet Mother Heroine from the Tbilisi dry bridge market. I did quite a bit of research online prior to purchasing it in an effort to get an authentic one. Nonetheless, I'm still having a hard time being certain because of the reason Chuck mentioned. Everything on the medal seems quite legitimate and authentic. The serial number and size and shape of it look good and the seller had what appeared to be the legitimate documentation. But it's hard to be certain if the star is real gold or a replacement. With that said, after buying the medal I used a powerful magnet to do perform the basic precious metal test. The star and medal in general do not seem to respond to the magnet at all, but the back of the medal moves very slightly in response to the magnet. No strong pull or attraction, but very slight one to the rivets. What were the rivets on an authentic HR made of? Any information is greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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  • 2 weeks later...

It is hard to tell, quality of pictures is rather low.

Easiest way to check is to weight it.

Gold is one of heaviest metals. Orders with exchanged star will be lighter. Fully original order weights 17.55 g (+-10%).

I have MH order with exchanged star and it weights 15.6 g.

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