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Gentleman's Military Interest Club

rosalie

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About rosalie

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  1. I agree with your comment about Aussie history, the true history is in the lives of these quite extraordinary people. I actually went to Hobart for the 150 year Anniversary of the Sisters of Charity and took the opportunity to visit Bothwell. William and his sister Eliza (the nun) were twins born in 1800 Kilkenny Ireland. All the Williams were interesting and had well recorded lives but Williams letters, especially those written from India give a great insight into what their lives were like and the difficulties they had. I am happy to share any information that might be useful, he does mention various people, some military some local Bothwell folk.
  2. Still a member, enjoying reading everyone's posts. William Williams was Police Magistrate in Bothwell I think he took over from Lt. Curtain, his constable P.W. Welsh went on to bigger and better things in Port Phillip. I have copies of various letters etc and there are some of his letters in the Clyde Company Papers Vol. 1. His sister was the first woman to profess her vows in Australia and arrived with 4 other nuns in Sydney, they were the first religious women here, Sisters of Charity who started St. Vincents, she was also one of the first three Sisters to Tasmania arriving in 1847 at St. Joseph's. His brother was a Port Phillip Pioneer, auctioneer Charles Williams from whom I descend. William transferred or swapped from the 57th to the 40th. His Uncle (by marriage to his Aunt Mary Finn) William Phillips was paymaster with the 40th. I have been to Bothwell, of course the original barracks are long gone but the building built later on Barrack Hill is still there and the current owners have left various drawings on the cell walls created by those who found themselves incarcerated there. There is a map of Bothwell drawn by William Williams in his attempt to get land for a pound. It was William's intention to settle in Tasmania probably Bothwell but that of course was not to be, it was a hard life even for an officer.
  3. My GG Uncle was Lt. William Williams of the 40th. He was awarded his father's vacant cornetcy in the 11th Light Dragoons following his father's rather heroic death at Salamanca in 1812, William was 12 years old. He was attached to the 57th then to the 40th when they went to Tasmania. He was Police Magistrate in Bothwell and he and a small band of his men chased Matthew Brady, an escapted convict/bushranger, into the path of John Batman. William is said to have shot Brady in the knee making his capture a little easier. He married Jane Reid daughter of Alexander Reid of Ratho, Bothwell then his regiment was sent to India. He was a Brevet Captain in India but the cost of living there was so exhorbitant he couldn't get ahead so he began learning Hindustani to work as a translater which would give him more income. In Nov 1834 he died, probably of cholera, just before returning to Tasmania and was buried in Colabah Cemetery. I have never been able to locate this cemetery. I have copies of a few letters written by him to Gov. Arthur about a pound in Bothwell and there is some information in Matthew Brady by Calder.
  4. My GG Uncle was Lt. William Williams of the 40th. He was awarded his father's vacant cornetcy in the 11th Light Dragoons following his father's rather heroic death at Salamanca in 1812, William was 12 years old. He was attached to the 57th then to the 40th when they went to Tasmania. He was Police Magistrate in Bothwell and he and a small band of his men chased Matthew Brady, an escapted convict/bushranger, into the path of John Batman. William is said to have shot Brady in the knee making his capture a little easier. He married Jane Reid daughter of Alexander Reid of Ratho, Bothwell then his regiment was sent to India. He was a Brevet Captain in India but the cost of living there was so exhorbitant he couldn't get ahead so he began learning Hindustani to work as a translater which would give him more income. In Nov 1834 he died, probably of cholera, just before returning to Tasmania and was buried in Colabah Cemetery. I have never been able to locate this cemetery. I have copies of a few letters written by him to Gov. Arthur about a pound in Bothwell and there is some information in Matthew Brady by Calder.
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