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leigh kitchen

The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers - (***MODERATORS' CHOICE)

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"The Colonel Falls......if Kingsley had to be taken, to be killed in action commanding a battalion of the 5th Fusiliers is the way he would have liked it......"

A link to a youtube video on "Imjin".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBAvVBVGkSE

The Alix Baker card "Major, 1st Battalion, Royal Northumberland Fusiliers, Korea 1950 - 51".

Edited by Chairman

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Light Infantryman, 5th Foot in the American War of Independence:

Charles Stadden's representation & that of Alix Baker.

The helmet shown in Stadden's & later Baker's artwork is based on a surving example which was worn by a William Head? William Herd?

I have an idea that it was sold at Wallis & Wallis auctions years ago.

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Alix Baker's Corporal, Grenader Company, 5th (Northumberland) Regiment of Foot, Peninsular War c1812.

The campaign during which the French derisively referred to the 5th's muddy green facings as being "goose sh/t" - later known as "gosling green"

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For completeness, the following three Alix Baker cards (they're already posted on other threads).

A sergeant of 2 NF, Mohawk Road Barracks, Shanghai, 1931:

Edited by Chairman

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http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_08_2009/post-2272-124911345728.jpgA matchbox cover I picked up (literally) somewhere years ago - "Made in Italy" it shows a Britsh soldier of the Napoleonic period, a "British Fusiler" the green facings albeit the wrong shade of green indicate that the regiment is the 5th Foot, I can't think of another Fusiler regiment which had green facings.

Edited by leigh kitchen

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Once in a while a stunning photo will come along and this one of "Meg" & her Dad is just one of those. Meg's dad is a Colour-Sgt in the Fusiliers, wearing what appears to be a frock coat, as there is no piping to the shoulder straps, which would appear on full dress. Hopefully he's Northumberland Fusiliers as the location itself is Newcastle and only they wore white facings at this time, being a 'non-Royal' regiment. Which battalion is difficult to determine and there are a couple of annomally's too;-

Firstly we have the plain bomb collar badges and not those of the Regimental pattern, which is what one would expect at this time.

Secondly what appear to be buttons unusually of a regimental pattern, whereas during this period the pattern of button worn was infact the General Service pattern.

He's not a V.B. member which would be determined by an Austrian knot above his cuff. So which battalion I just couldn't say but it's one of those photo's which speak volumes and one wonders what happend to Meg.

A special thanks to our Tyneside Irish who sold me the photo.

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Another rarity. This small cloth scarlet 'V'(5th Foot) came along with some items to the 9th(Service)Bn,NF and therefore believed to be WWI vintage. Although not 100% certain where it was worn, either at the base of the collar of the SD jacket or on the steel helmet cover this is probably an officers badge as the material itself is scarlet melton cloth and so harder wearing than cotton embroided badges or felt cloth. It's larger than the 'V' stitched to a gosling green square and worn by all ranks during WWII.

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Worn between 1940 & 1950 by officers and other ranks RNF, this was worn on both arms of the battledress uniform and you will notice the inferiority of the scarlet 'V' when compared to that in the last post.

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The rare coloured cloth slip identifier of 43rd(6th(City)Bn,RNF)Royal Tank Regiment. Somewhere in the collection I have a photo of a member of 43rd RTR wearing the slip-on, which I'll try and post.

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Something a bit unusual - ever wondered what happend to those lovely sets of drums carried by drummers on parade - well it appears that when they reached the end of their life they were often turned into ornaments and here we have a half drum which once belonged to the 1st Battatlion, Northumberland Fusiliers, which was certainly used up to the end of the Great War.

Apologies for the photography and inclusion of the date, but I'm no photo geek.

Edited by Graham Stewart

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