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I have friends in London who visit SA to see an elderly relative.  Surprisingly, it is his wife who is the collector  -  she is presently researching a book on Zulu artefacts and has also started to collect old decorated truncheons.  During their last visit she produced photos of recent additions for my identification and I thought members might be interested.  This could take a few days, so I will 'pin' the post until finished.   Please feel free to comment  -  and also add any interesting ones that you may have in your own collections.005.thumb.JPG.fd9daab72180364eaa9267dc62

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This is a well known copy - made in India probably in the 1960's.   There are about 6 to 8 in the series and all are named for British Towns.

How did I identify them as fakes  -  British truncheons are held at arm's length to show the inscription.  With these they would have to be held in

a downwards position.005_1_1_1_1.thumb.jpg.ca0001d892cd27b852

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This may be an original for Suffolk  -  the outline looks clean.  However, the paint may have faded and it has been repainted.

006.JPG

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This is a nice Parish Constable's truncheon for the Town of Bodmin  -  in Cornwall.  A small market town it's main purpose was to supply Dartmoor Prison.009.thumb.JPG.2abc2dd0143a07270fdf49f039

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This is020.thumb.JPG.88cb71c145c504ad153daf0a71 a small pattern Town Constable for Birmingham.  Mid-Victorian period  -  the arms are those of the Birmingham family.

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Some very nice truncheons to be sure.  As always you have not simply stopped that the "look at this" stage and added some excellent information regarding replicas.  You may have saved some members (me included) from making a very expensive mistake in purchasing one of the Indian copies as an authetic specimen.  When we are at militarial shows it is sometimes hard to look at a specimen and relize that something is wrong.  The image of a British police officer holding one of these out at arm's length, as identification, should stick in our heads for future reference.

Many thanks Mervyn.

 

Regards

Brian

 

Edited by Brian Wolfe

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Mid - 1850's this is a Special Constables Truncheon for the City of Edinburgh.    Surprisingly, it has the Naval fouled anchor.014.thumb.JPG.336b01c03c4ad1ff6f3d2d7cc2

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When the Metropolitan Police were first formed in 1829 , this was the last year of George 4th's Reign.  He was followed by his brother - William 4th and in 1837 Queen Victoria ascended to the Throne.  The early constables wore a leather case on their belt and this held the truncheon.  Truncheons marked for Bow Street were one pattern  -  however,  no-one is a 100% sure of the pattern for William 4th.   The one shown here is the first pattern for Victoria and was made by the Met. Police Armourers - Field and Co..  015.thumb.JPG.b86af1c9c061ad788dfcf70a62

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This version with a plainer 'MP' appears to have followed the earlier one.  Again it was worn in a cylindrical leather case and would have remained in use until the 1860's , when the Met changed it's Tunics to the 'Berlin' pattern.  From that period Truncheons were carried in a long pocket inside of the right trouser leg.019.thumb.JPG.e56191372361dd59671cb0be6e

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Following the end of the 1st WW many midlands Forces presented their special constables with a commemorative truncheon.  Usually, the coats-of-arms were silkscreened onto the wood and the date of service included.  They are very collectable, although the silk screening tends to wear off. This one is for Birmingham.023.thumb.JPG.2cf1cad178c93bd62f2a7b3bcf  

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The City of Manchester had many smaller towns and Parishes surrounding it.   These tended to use a pattern of Truncheon known as a Baluster.  One side usually had the King's Cypher and the other the name of the town or, the Constables initials.   Ones in good condition are hard to find 024.thumb.JPG.269b52b666c8c94fc01a587155and very often they are from the 18th Century.

This one is King George 3rd  -  1760 - 1820.

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The great thing about this forum is the help that comes across so often. I was researching a truncheon online and found an identical one here at the beginning of this thread. Sadly learning that I have a 'fake' truncheon. :-/ I must admit though this did have a very fakeness about it. Look at the crown for instance, also the finish of item is of high gloss varnish, so wrong!

bath-truncheon.jpg

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Hello,

One of the first things I noticed was that the printing and art work are upside down compaired with the examples I have seen and those in my modest collection.  I believe that the painted truncheon was the next progression after the tip staff and would have been used to show the officer's legislative authority.  Holding a tip satff or a painted truncheon "up" as their warrant card, so-to-speak, would necessitate that the printing would be the correct way up when viewed by the suspect.  Best not to put too much faith in my opinion as I am not an authority on the subject.

Regards

Brian

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