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clouseau

Battle of Friedland, 1807

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First of all, I would like to introduce myself as a new member of this forum. My name is Peter, I live in Germany, I am a collector and member of the German “Gesellschaft fuer Heereskunde”. I am particularly interested in the times of the frederic the great and the Napoleonic Wars.
 
I have read here several times that some members can provide information on Russian awards and officers. I do not speak Russian, nor can I read the Cyrillic script. That's why I address everyone today with one question:

On December 8, 1807, the Prussian Order Pour le Mérite was awarded to Captain Yevgeny Nikiforovich Marin of the Russian Life-Guards Horse Regiment (?, in german: “Regiment Leib-Garde zu Pferde”).

According to Friedhelm Heyde (Die altpreußischen Orden …; Abt. B, S. 149, Biblio Verlag, 1979) and the Prussian “Ordensliste 1817” (p. 89, no. 867) he was one of 46 officers of the Russian Guard, to whom this Order was apparently awarded for the Battle of Friedland on June 14, 1807.

According to Hamelman / Martin (The History of the Prussian Pour le Merite Order, Vol. I, 1740 - 1812, Verlag Sammlerfreund, Hamburg 1982, No. 458, p. 301) "... a more political gesture than in recognition of distinguished military service or for distinction in action”. In 1835 he became judge at the conscience court in Voronezh (in german: “Gewissens-Gericht von Woronesch”).

 

In case of this officer I am looking for more information: date of birth and death, military career, if possible, the more exact occasion of the award and possibly other awards from the wars of liberation.

Is there a chance to find a picture of him somewhere?

 

I would be very happy if someone from this circle could help me.

 
 

 

 

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On ‎10‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 13:29, clouseau said:

 

First of all, I would like to introduce myself as a new member of this forum. My name is Peter, I live in Germany, I am a collector and member of the German “Gesellschaft fuer Heereskunde”. I am particularly interested in the times of the frederic the great and the Napoleonic Wars.

 

I have read here several times that some members can provide information on Russian awards and officers. I do not speak Russian, nor can I read the Cyrillic script. That's why I address everyone today with one question:


 

On December 8, 1807, the Prussian Order Pour le Mérite was awarded to Captain Yevgeny Nikiforovich Marin of the Russian Life-Guards Horse Regiment (?, in german: “Regiment Leib-Garde zu Pferde”).

According to Friedhelm Heyde (Die altpreußischen Orden …; Abt. B, S. 149, Biblio Verlag, 1979) and the Prussian “Ordensliste 1817” (p. 89, no. 867) he was one of 46 officers of the Russian Guard, to whom this Order was apparently awarded for the Battle of Friedland on June 14, 1807.

According to Hamelman / Martin (The History of the Prussian Pour le Merite Order, Vol. I, 1740 - 1812, Verlag Sammlerfreund, Hamburg 1982, No. 458, p. 301) "... a more political gesture than in recognition of distinguished military service or for distinction in action”. In 1835 he became judge at the conscience court in Voronezh (in german: “Gewissens-Gericht von Woronesch”).

 

In case of this officer I am looking for more information: date of birth and death, military career, if possible, the more exact occasion of the award and possibly other awards from the wars of liberation.

Is there a chance to find a picture of him somewhere?

 

I would be very happy if someone from this circle could help me.


 


 

Nikifor Mikhailovich Marin who was awarded St. Vladimir 4the class 22/9/1792 may be his father (1829 list of cavalier awardees)

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10/10/1799  Chevalier Guardsman Yevgenii Nikiforovich Marin of the Chevalier Guards promoted to Cornet in the Life-Guards Horse Regiment (Highest Orders, also in L-Gds Horse Rgt Regimental History book)

1804 promoted to Rittmeister (captain) (regimental history)

Nov. 1805 at Austerlitz, for which awarded St. Anne 3rd class with bow (regimental history)

4/5/1806 awarded St. Anne 4th class (1829 list of cavalier awardees)

13/9/1806 Rittmeister Marin granted 4 month's leave (Highest Orders)

1807 on campaign, for which awarded Prussian Pour le Merite and St. Vladimir 4th class with bow. (regimental history)

20/5/1808 St. Vladimir 4th class with bow (1829 list of cavalier awardees)

29/6/1808 released into retirement due to illness, granted rank of colonel (regimental history)

2/4/1828 awarded St. Anne 2nd class (1829 list of chevalier awardees)

25/8/1839 awarded St. Stanislav 2nd class (1849 list of chevalier awardees)

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1854 Lieutenant Petr Yevgen'evich Marin of the Corps of Engineers of the Military Settlements might be his son. (Adres-Kalendar 1854)

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On ‎10‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 13:29, clouseau said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On ‎10‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 13:29, clouseau said:

 

 



 

 

 

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Hello mconrad, 
many thanks for the detailed information. It was certainly a lot of work to search 
all the data. 
I never thought Marin would receive so many high orders, especially when you read 
the text of hamelman. So Marin seems to habe been a brave officer.

I am interestet in his life an career, because maybe some day I can buy the prussian award dokument from another collector. At this time, in prussia the plm was called "Verdienst-Orden / Orden vom Verdienst" , because after the lost war against France, they wanted to avoid the French currency "Pour lé mérite".

If there is interest, I can introduce it here

 

 


 
Edited by clouseau
correction

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Not especially high awards for bravery. The sa3, sa4, sv4 were typical for mid-ranking officers in prestigious regiments who saw several actions during a major war. 

The sa2 and ss2 in later life were no doubt civil service awards, when Marin was a retired officer. 

No real work to get this data, because for years now I've been maintaining a database on all officers, and constantly adding to it, mostly for the first half of the 19th century.

Glad to help.

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