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Current Russian Communist Medals


Greg Collins
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The Communist Party of the Russian Federation, the heir-apparent to the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, has issued several commemorative medals. Insofar as I know, these are not awarded but, rather, sold to raise funds. These medals are NOT official, nor are they Umalatova medals. As I have already covered the "130 Yeras of I.V. Stalin" medal in another thread, I won't include it here.

It is worthy to note that, while United Russia holds the majority of seats in the Russian Duma, the CPRF comes in second with a little less than 1/4 of the total seats. Also, according to RT (formerly Russia Today), the CPRF has made new gains at more local levels recently.

First, the CPRF logo as it appears on the documents and on the backs of their medals.

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Last for now (I have two additional medals in transit- will post when they arrive), the medal itself. Heavy, two piece construction (the portrait disk is white metal plated and attached to the base). Design definitely influenced by the Order of Lenin.

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A couple more additions to this end of the collection. The medal to commemorate "90 Years of the Great October Socialist Revolution". Modeled, of course, on the Order of the October Revolution this is a heavy alloy with hot enamel and standard aluminum suspension. Note that the back bears only the hammer and sickle aspect of the logo. Released in 2007. First, the document:

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Great medals. I'm still quite surprised at the high quality of many non governmental (unofficial) awards in modern Russia. Some are so nice I purchased them even knowing full well they were unofficial.

I must however share my feelings with you on the communist medals... They literally freak me out! To me, seeing the communist party not only being allowed to exist in post Soviet Russia but even to the point of still issuing decorations is akin to the NSDAP being allowed to go on and issue swastika bearing awards in post 1945 Germany.

I simply don't get it!:speechless:

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Hmmm, well, I suppose it could be explained in this way: the transition from Communism to Capitalism in Russia was, essentially peaceful, especially when you consider what happened in Romania. The Communist Party didn't go anywhere, as is evidenced by the seats it currently holds in the Duma. They were not accused of crimes or put on trial as the Nazis were- which not only was an indictment of individuals but of a system. In Russia, the monuments still stand, Lenin still rests in the mausoleum on Red Square, it is still called Red Square. In May, there will be a 65th Anniversary of Victory parade in Red Square- this year with units from the Allied nations (a first) and there will be plenty of hammers and sickles to be seen and, of course, the Russian holy-of-holys, the flag that was placed on the Reichstag. And, of course, we all remember Putin saying that the break-up of the Soviet Union was the most catastrophic event of the 20th century. Communism is just not the "boogy man" over there as it is in Conservative circles here- after all, it DID bring the serfdom that Russia was into the super power Russia became in less than 30 years.

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Yeah... Valid points... I guess the post Stalinist purges and trials were essentially to whitewash the major political decisions (repressions/deportations/border line genocides) and events (horrors) that actually forged them into what they were at the time.

Way too many people remained in power after 91 that had already held high offices under a different system. It might've ensured a semi-peaceful transition, but it has long lasting effects.

Still... Not quite sure I'll ever get used to it.

Edited by TacHel
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Here's an interesting medal for a couple of reasons. First, it's another "130 Years of Stalin" medal from the same organization but, unlike the previous example, the only things linking this medal to the Communist Party of the Russian Federation is the stamped organizational seal and the stamped signature of Gennady Zyuganov, the head of the organization. A very well made medal of heavy alloy, I suspect this was made independently, sold to the CPRF who, in turn, resold it to raise funds. This medal may have been the inspiration for the CPRF to create it's own medal shown previously in this thread. From a designer's point of view, I have to say I like this medal a bit more than the previous one due to the more distinct, bold design.

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A close-up of the medal. It is apparent that the basis of the design is the Order of Alexander Nevsky- the overall shape and the shield. The only aspect that I would have spent more time on is refining the image of Stalin a bit more. I really like the illusion of the red star "piercing" the gold star due to the banner placement- this did not just happen; it was well thought out by the designer. Just a great design.

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You're doing pretty good, you're only missing 4 more to have the lot:

Медаль "60 лет Победы" - Medal for 60 Years of Victory.

Памятная медаль "65 лет разгрома немецко-фашистских войск под Москвой" - Commemorative Medal "65 Years of the Defeat of Nazi Troops near Moscow".

Знак "Партийная Доблесть" КПРФ - Badge "Party Valor" CPRF.

Знак "За Заслуги перед Партией" - Badge "For Merit to the Party".

Edited by TacHel
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Actually I've seen some pretty good stuff coming out of what used to be the USSR of late (some pretty bad stuff as well). Is it up to par with the Soviet items... I don't think so as far as the orders are concerned, maybe some of the lesser medals. But, hey, there was alot of government money behind the Monetny Dvor- of course the quality was top notch. These are pretty damned good medals for privately made medals, IMO.

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OK, yet another CPRF medal; the "65 Years of the Defeat of Nazi Troops near Moscow" medal. A departure from the norm in two notable ways; first, it is a standard round-shaped medal and, second, there is no logo, either full or partial, on the back... simply "CPRF" at the base of the back. Heavy alloy or brass, red enamel and what has become a "generic" victory ribbon suspension.

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