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Guest Darrell

Canadian Medals

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Guest Darrell

Well since I don't see a Canadian Section (so to speak) I guess these would go here in the Good Ol' Commonwealth :beer:

While many Modern (i.e. circa 1970's and up) medals are now made with that "lovely" Rhodium Plating, they are still a part of history and the Canadian Honours System.

The following couple are the first of these "Modern" types I have collected so far. Many more to come I hope.

Edited by Darrell

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Guest Darrell

1. Canadian Special Service Medal (c/w NATO+OTAN Clasp):

Background:

+ Originally instituted in 1984.

+ The original regulations indicated that each medal was to be named, and this remained in place until the regulations were changed in 1992 - however, no medal was ever officially named.

+ The medal was "revived" in 1991, around the same time as the Korea Volunteer Service Medal and the Gulf and Kuwait Medals were being developed.

+ As of 2005, seven bars have been authorized, although one (Jugoslavija) was revolked and never issued. The medal can be awarded Posthumously.

+ Awarded for a Special Service in a specific theatre; the criteria vary according to the bar. The medal is never issued without a bar.

In this example the following Criteria for the NATO+OTAN bar:

+ The recipient must have served 180 days of honourable service within the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's area of responsibility, defined as the territory of any of the parties in Europe or North America, the Algerian departments of France, or the territory of Turkey or the islands under the jurisdiction of any of the parties in the North Atlantic north of the Tropic of Cancer.

+ A person must have been under NATO command for 180 days to qualify for this bar.

+ The award is also given to those serving within forces deployed on vessels or aircraft of any of the parties, when in or over these territories or any other areas of Europe in which occupation forces of any parties were stationed, or the Mediterranean Sea or the North Atlantic area north of the Tropic of Cancer, since NATO's establishment on 01 January 1951.

+ The bar was first created in 1992, and the criteria was revised in 1995.

Obverse:

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Guest Darrell

2. Canadian Forces Decoration.

There were two variations of this medal, one with the effigy of King George VI, one with Queen Elizabeth II.

Some background.

+ The Canadian Forces Decoration was established on 15 December 1949. The King (George VI) approved the creation on 08 March 1950.

+ When it was instituted the CD was unique in that it was awarded to all ranks, from enlisted soldiers to flag and general officers.

+ On 07 June 1951, the first Canadian Forces Decoration was presented to Viscount Alexander of Tunis.

+ Following the death of King George VI in February 1952, the design of the CD was altered to bear the effigy of Queen Elizabeth II.

+ The Canadian Forces Decoration was created as a replacement for a variety of British Long Service awards that were bestowed upon Canadians for service in the RCN, Canadian Army and the RCAF.

+ Awarded to officers and Non Commissioned members of the Canadian Forces who have completed 12 years of service. The last eight years must have been "good" in order to qualify for the CD.

+ Additional "Bars" are awarded for further service. They are for 10 additional years service each.

+ Recipients are allowed to use the initials "C.D." after their names.

+ Number of Awards (as of 2005) - King George VI Type (approx. 14,000), Queen Elizabeth II Type (approx. 217,000; clasps approx. 84,500).

Obverse of the Queen Elizabeth II Type:

Edited by Darrell

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The medal can be awarded Posthumously.

As was my uncle's (R.C.A.F. Gros Tenquin). He was killed in an accident in 1957. Over 30 years later I asked my aunt to apply for it (she had already given me Uncle Bill's medals).

When it arrived, the covering letter congratulated WO W. Hamilton on receiving it.

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Guest Darrell

Scan of the engraved name. The wierd look on the "G" is due to poor scan of medal held on edge :speechless:

Awardee:

CPL J.C.G. FONTAINE

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Bravo,

:beer:

Keep em coming,

Do you have more beautifull medals/decorations/orders of Canada??

This club keeps on extending and spreading it's knowledge in unchartered territories :)

:jumping:

It's just great to see!!!!! :beer:

Kind regards

Jacky

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Guest Darrell

3. Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal.

The Peacekeeping Service Medal was established in part so Canadian Peacekeepers would receive an award from Canada, besides the service medals from the United Nations, NATO and others that they would usually receive. The medal was established to acknowledge the award of the 1988 Nobel Peace Prize to all UN peacekeepers. The plan was temporarily shelved due to some concern voiced by the Department of National Defence. They were concerned that in most cases two medals would be awarded for all UN operations, which was contrary to the Canadian honours policy.

In late 1996 a private members Bill was introduced into the House of Commons. Parliament subsequently passed an act sanctioning the creation of the medal, making it the only medal in the Canadian honours system that was established through an act of Parliament.

This medal is awarded for 30 days service, roughly 1/3 as long as most UN Peacekeeping service medal requirements.

Those who had previously not qualified for a UN Medal or the Special Service Medal with the "Peace" bar, thus became eligible for the new medal.

Civilians can also be awarded this medal, although it is primarily awarded to members of the Canadian Forces.

Approximately 69,543 medals have been awarded to date. A total of 125,000 personnel are eligible, and the number grows each year.

Obverse:

Edited by Darrell

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Guest Darrell

4. Canadian Centennial Medal 1967

The Centennial Medal finds its origins in the 1947 Independence Medals issued in India and Pakistan. Both of these countries inaugurated the tradition of striking commemorative medals on important national occasions not directly associated with the Sovereign.

+ Awarded to Canadian citizens who were deemed to have made a significant contribution to their community, province or the country as a whole.

+ The Obverse bears a maple leaf superimposed with a Royal cypher, circumscibed with "Confederation Canada Confederation". The reverse depicts the Royal Arms of Canada with the dates "1867-1967" in the base.

+ The Medal was struck from sterling silver from the Royal Canadian Mint. Issued Un-named, although those personally presented by the governor general and those awarded to Government House staff members were officially impressed in block capitals with the person's full name. The medal was designed by Bruce Beatty.

+ Several Gold Plated specimens exist which were originally to be awarded to the Expo 67 commissioners, although there is no evidence that the awards were ever presented.

+ In the mid- 1990's, the Canadian Chancellery ran out of the original issue of the Centennial Medal struck by the Royal Canadian Mint. The contract to strike replacement issues was awarded to Henry Birks & Sons. The Birks issues, although struck in sterling silver, are distinguishable from the mint's original striking because they are slightly thinner and the upper bar on the reverse of the suspender is marked, in raised letters, "Birks Sterling".

+ 29, 500 were awarded.

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Guest Darrell

5. The Commemorative Medal for the 125th Anniversary of Confederation, 1992

Part of the 125th Anniversary of Confederation program "Canada 125", this medal is based upon the 1967 Centennial Medal. It was formally established on 7 May 1992.

The medal was awarded to people who made a significant contribution to the wellbeing of their fellow citizens, their community or to Canada. Recipients were selected by a variety of government officials, including elected politicians.

The medal was issued in a blue cardboard box with the Royal Arms of Canada and the dates 1867-1992 stamped on the lid.

It is projected that 50,000 would be presented, but only 42,000 were issued due to problems with the program's administration and a lack of nominations.

Obverse:

Edited by Darrell

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Guest Darrell

6. Canadian Police Exemplary Service Medal

Background:

The Police Exemplary Service Medal, created on August 12, 1983, recognizes police officers who have served in an exemplary manner, characterized by good conduct, industry and efficiency. Recipients must have completed 20 years of full-time service with one or more recognized Canadian police forces. Full-time police cadets in training also qualify for the award. Consideration is given only to periods of service for which no other national long service, good conduct or efficiency decoration has been awarded.

Members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and Canadian Forces are ineligible. However, full-time exemplary service of former members of the RCMP and Military Police of the Canadian Forces may qualify where that service has not been recognized by award of the RCMP Long Service and Good Conduct Medal or the Canadian Forces Decoration, respectively. The Medal may be awarded posthumously.

Description: a circular medal:

on the obverse of which are the Scales of Justice, superimposed on a stylized maple leaf, and circumscribed with EXEMPLARY SERVICE . SERVICES DISTINGU?S, and

on the reverse of which is the Royal Cipher

the Medal is suspended from a ribbon of five equal stripes, two gold and three blue; a Bar, bearing a stylized maple leaf, may be awarded to a recipient of the Medal for each additional 10-year period of full-time service with one or more Canadian police forces.

a. Carton for the Case. With Name and 1 bar designation on the lid:

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Guest Darrell

c. Inside of Carton for Case Lid with the Rideau Stamp:

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Guest Darrell

f. Case Open Bottom (Soft Maroon Velvet Insert):

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