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I had no idea where to put this, but as I first saw this pattern during the tragic siege of Beslan I thought this was as good a place as any. Couldn't really put it under Third Reich fakes, though I could see someone trying to palm it off as a "rare SS para pattern".

Being a collector of all things military and having many reference books on camouflage, I can't but wonder why the Russians would choose this pattern, but as the pictures show it is very effective. I can't remember every source I got these shots from, but I have included as many as I can remember.

Regards;

Johnsy

Sources:

http://www.russiancombatgear.com/product_d..._Suit_(SSO).php

http://www.sposn.ru/summer.html

http://www.sposn.ru/

http://creative.gettyimages.com/source/home/home.aspx

Edited by Tiger-pie
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Here are two "swatches" of the material in its summer varient. For those who don't immediately recognise what it resembles, this pattern is very much like the Eichlaub (oak leaf) series of patterns developed by and for the use of the Waffen-SS combat troops, usually in the form of a simple pullover smock. I guess you could call it spring and summer variations, you simply turn your uniform inside out for the drab side.

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Good lord, that is unreal. The colors are different, but the effect is the same. That even looks like a WW2 anorak with the hood and the pocket in front. Kind of like when the US came out with the "Fritz" Kevlar helmet in the 80's. People thought they were crazy. But I guess a good design is a good design no matter who last used it. I wonder what the Russian WW2 vets think when they see it? :speechless1::banger:

Dan

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Good lord, that is unreal. The colors are different, but the effect is the same. That even looks like a WW2 anorak with the hood and the pocket in front. Kind of like when the US came out with the "Fritz" Kevlar helmet in the 80's. People thought they were crazy. But I guess a good design is a good design no matter who last used it. I wonder what the Russian WW2 vets think when they see it? :speechless1::banger:

Dan

I do remember a US Normandy veteran saying;"I used to shoot at guys dressed like that!", when he first saw the new uniform that was worn in Grenada by US forces.

I will post some more shots here, there is a reversible spring/autumn cold weather version aswell. The autumn pattern is much more like the German version. This is not an official pattern, this is a commercial pattern called "Partizan" ironically. It has however been adopted by Special Forces for its effective pattern. See below.

Regards;

Johnsy

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For comparison here is the original German patterns, photos from www.kamouflage.net. Compare the pattern on the fall side with the swatch on the left in post #1.

Regards;

Johnsy

Edited by Tiger-pie
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  • 1 month later...

In a previous life, I covered Beslan real-time for the military, and if memory serves right (I've been gone for several years), Johnsy's initial photos show members of the the FSB's Alfa Spetsnaz detachment going into action after everything started going south during the siege.

Granted, this in itself may not be of too much interest to you guys, but at the time, this was definitely unique garb amongst the mix of forces there (ie, motor rifle troops, MVD Internal Troops, MVD Spetsnaz, OMON, Emercom, etc), and that which was associated with Russia's most elite hostage-rescue unit. Note, too, the advanced weaponry and integrated comms equipment on their helmets--you won't find that in an average motor rifle regiment...! :cheers:

Great stuff from dark days! :ninja:

Gaffken

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In a previous life, I covered Beslan real-time for the military, and if memory serves right (I've been gone for several years), Johnsy's initial photos show members of the the FSB's Alfa Spetsnaz detachment going into action after everything started going south during the siege.

Granted, this in itself may not be of too much interest to you guys, but at the time, this was definitely unique garb amongst the mix of forces there (ie, motor rifle troops, MVD Internal Troops, MVD Spetsnaz, OMON, Emercom, etc), and that which was associated with Russia's most elite hostage-rescue unit. Note, too, the advanced weaponry and integrated comms equipment on their helmets--you won't find that in an average motor rifle regiment...! :cheers:

Great stuff from dark days! :ninja:

Gaffken

On the contrary, any snippet of info is appreciated. :cheers:

Dark days indeed, I saw a doco on Beslan, it was very confronting.

Regards;

Johnsy

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