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Model Soldiers display


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I have a collection of 3 "dioramas" recently recovered from the loft of an old cottage

They appear to tell a specific story - this being the second of 3. My military knowledge is not good but this appears to show a disceplinary of some short

The figures appear to be a light clay and are 8" high each

These have plent of age and were in a bit of a state but have had a clean up, I am trying to date them by unifrom but do not have the knowledge, I will post pics of the other two under seperate messages due to file size

Any help would be appreciated

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When were the ankle-gaiters for Other Ranks introduced? 1930s? So not earlier than that?

I had someone look at them today and they believe they are end of dated between end of ww2 and early 50's - local auction house dates them as mid to late 40's

Purely by looking at the condition and ageing of the items, and the metal wire fixings underneath either of thos could be accurate I think

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Looks like Battle Dress on the "Redcap" & the figure (Sgt Major?) with back to camera, so circa WWII - 1960's, the unit need not be cavalry as certain officer ranks within an infantry unit would wear mounted uniform items such as riding breeches & boots - eg, the Lt Colonel in command of an infantry battalion.

It's noteworthy that the figure "tapping the boards" ie up on a charge is wearing a belt - I don't know exactly when the custom came in or if it varied between units, but the prisoner was not allowed to wear headgear or waistbelt, allegedly so that he could notmake matters worse for himself by using them as missiles or weapons against the officer who was weighing him off.

Personally, the last thing that went through my mind in that situation was to upset officers & sergeant majors further than I had done already by throwing my beret at them.

Is the "prisoner" wearing Battle Dress with its waist length blouse & large pocket on the trousers left thigh or a Service Dress tunic?

Is that a badge on the left upper arm of the figure with back to camera?

Dark Blue caps with yellow piping?

They have that hand made baked clay/ hardened plasticine look of the figures that Roy Dilley etc used to make during the 60's-70's.

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The Seargent Major has what appears to be a red sash over his shoulder, that would be Infantry.

The sash for senior NCOs/Officers in line Infantry (as opposed to Rifles) has only one credible theory of origin that I know of. This is the theory that dates back to the Marlburian period during which both officers and Sgts carried pikes rather than muskets. This pike (sometimes caled a spontoon, halberd, etc.) was quite heavy and carrying it on the field of battle was a pain. As a result (the theory goes), the sash was worn from one shoulder to the waist, with a large knot tied in it. The haft of the pike was slid through the knot and thus given some additional support (and freeing up one hand for short periods). Later, the officers in the British Army stopped carrying the pike, but the practice persisted amongst Sgts right through the Napoleonic Wars (except for Rifles). Sometime after that it ceased, except for the Sgts cane which, I have read, is a vestigial remnant of the practice of Sgts carrying a pike.

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Yep, that's the standing officer figure wearing a Sam Browne - the more I look at it the figure with back to camera does look as if it's wearing a red sash rather than a Sam Browne.......

I think you are right - here's a closer pic - seems to be a tassle there also

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Yep, he's wearing a sash, & the arm badge of a RSM of the foot guards. I had wondered if that was a RSMs badge or just a fault in the paintwork.

The colouring of the RSMs cap may tell us the regiment, failing that the cap badge. The paint on his cap is worn, but is it dark blue with white band & piping - if so, Coldstream Guards.

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Yep, he's wearing a sash, & the arm badge of a RSM of the foot guards. I had wondered if that was a RSMs badge or just a fault in the paintwork.

The colouring of the RSMs cap may tell us the regiment, failing that the cap badge. The paint on his cap is worn, but is it dark blue with white band & piping - if so, Coldstream Guards.

Hi excellnt thats cleared that up

The cap is dark blue wuith white band and piping

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