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Universal (Bren Gun) Carrier photo


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Hello Everyone,

Besides my interest in medals I have always been drawn to the Universal Carriers used in WW II. My fasination has stopped short of trying to restore one due mostly to lack of mechanical ability and storage space. I have some books on the subject and a few photos of restored Carriers and picture postcards from the WW II era. While thumbing through my copy of Osprey's Universal Carrier 1936 - 48 by David Fletcher for the 100th time (well maybe not the 110th), I noticed one photo that looked very familiar as did the vehicle I.D. number. It turns out that on page 24 (denoted as "A") there is a Carrier drawn that I have on a picture postcard. The artist has eliminated the soldiers and the rifle muzzels shown on my picture but it is the same Carrier.

I thought I would post it here with their write-up.

Machine Gun Carrier No.2 Mark 1, 2nd Battalion the Cheshire Regiment, c. 1937

The 2nd Battalion provided a motorized infantry element for the 1927 Experimental Armoured Force and in subsequent years employed the troublesome little Carden-Loyd Carriers. Designed as a machine gun battalion and equipped with Machine Gun Carriers. It would have exchanged these for 15cwt platoon trucks once the Bren Gun was introduced. In peacetime, when appearances counted for more than camouflage, the vehicle would have been finished in a glossy dark green and decorated with the regimental badge and battalion title [as in my photo]. The large red A indicates a front-line, combat vehicle; other types carried a B. The War Office census number was the carrier's primary identification but, between wars, military vehicles were also required to display a civilian-style registration plate, invariably in sequences issued by the County of Middlesex.

As an added bit of information, just below gunners (?) feet you can see the Track-Adjusting Bar axiffed to the side of the Carrier.

I hope you found this interesting.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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Here is a close-up of the identification number area showing the large red A, the T and Regimental identification. Give this would have provided too much information to the enemy and would have been removed when war broke out. We can assume that this Carrier was one that would have been painted glossy dark green. The track-adjustment bar can be seen quite clearly.

A simple tool that probably worked well enough in the field (or not at all). :angry::lol:

Thanks for looking.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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  • 3 months later...

This is a very nice picture, is it a post card type photo? Thank you for sharing it with us, I love the armor history.

Lorenzo

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This is a very nice picture, is it a post card type photo? Thank you for sharing it with us, I love the armor history.

Lorenzo

Yes, it's a postcard. I think it is common one as others are available on ebay quite often.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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Yes, it's a postcard. I think it is common one as others are available on ebay quite often.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

Well its very nice for a collection display, do you have any more like this post card?

Thank you for sharing

Lorenzo

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Well its very nice for a collection display, do you have any more like this post card?

Thank you for sharing

Lorenzo

Hello Lorenzo,

I do have a few more picture in my collection. I am working on a history about my wife's uncle who was killed just after D-day while driving a carrier. I have been trying to make my posts a bit more interesting by adding history with the post. The story of my wife's uncle is still a work in progress and I'll post it when it is finished. Here's the "interesting" part of the post. We have a battle field find of a Universal Carrier track that was found in the actual area where he was killed! A letter from his CO stated his carrier took a direct hit. Whether this was from a tank or not there is no way of telling and whether the track section we have was from his carrier or not is also unknown.

Cheers

Brian

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Hello Lorenzo,

I do have a few more picture in my collection. I am working on a history about my wife's uncle who was killed just after D-day while driving a carrier. I have been trying to make my posts a bit more interesting by adding history with the post. The story of my wife's uncle is still a work in progress and I'll post it when it is finished. Here's the "interesting" part of the post. We have a battle field find of a Universal Carrier track that was found in the actual area where he was killed! A letter from his CO stated his carrier took a direct hit. Whether this was from a tank or not there is no way of telling and whether the track section we have was from his carrier or not is also unknown.

Cheers

Brian

I would love to hear about him, To remember a fallen commrade. I love the WWII Halftrack do you know what type it was?

Edited by IMHF
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I would love to hear about him, To remember a fallen commrade. I love the WWII Halftrack do you know what type it was?

Thanks Lorenzo,

The "carrier" I mention is the Universar Carrier MK I & II sometimes called the Bren Gun Carrier.

You would have liked a Military Museum I "tried" to visit a few weeks ago. It is about 2 1/2 hours from where I life and they have several tracked vehicles rebuilt. I say "tried" because the fellow I was to meet for the tour took ill and I had to be satisfied with some photos of the tanks that were on display outside of the museum. I burned them to a CD but I'm not sure how to post them on the forum from the CD. When I figure it out I intend to post them.

Cheers

Brian

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks Lorenzo,

The "carrier" I mention is the Universar Carrier MK I & II sometimes called the Bren Gun Carrier.

You would have liked a Military Museum I "tried" to visit a few weeks ago. It is about 2 1/2 hours from where I life and they have several tracked vehicles rebuilt. I say "tried" because the fellow I was to meet for the tour took ill and I had to be satisfied with some photos of the tanks that were on display outside of the museum. I burned them to a CD but I'm not sure how to post them on the forum from the CD. When I figure it out I intend to post them.

Cheers

Brian

Are you talking about the Canadian Military Heritage Museum in Brantford, Ontario?

Lorenzo

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No, the one I visited before this post was in Oshawa Ontario, they specialize in military vehicles. You would be in heaven, my friend.

Cheers

Brian

I love seeing Armor: Fort Knox has a nice collection of Armor: They have in side a King Tiger, with one side cut off so you can see in side:

Lorenzo

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Not at this time, I plan on another trip there when I can get a break from work.

Cheers

Brian

Ok I will be waiting to see them pictures of your next trip:

Thank you

Lorenzo

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