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I'm looking for some information about the 4th Battalion, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment) before the war. I'm also trying to figure out more about the British Army system, since it differs quite a lot from ours in Finland :D As I understand, they were at first stationed at Woolwich (where it was first raised in Feb, 1900), moving in 1901 to Aldershot. It was never outside the British Isles till it landed at Boulogne on August 14, 1914.

They were in Devonport in August 1914. Any information or accounts about the mobilisation day?

They were entrained for Southampton on 13 August, and embarked on the same day for France via SS Mombasa.

- What I wish to know what part did Mill Hill and Devonport played for this battalion?

- Exactly what is ment with term "Depot"? Some sort of assemly place or the headquarters?

- Where did they train?

- Possible biographies of the soldiers who served there before 1914 would also be welcome. Also period photographs.

Regards,

Tuomas

PS. This is for a graphic novel I'm working on.

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Tuomas,

I'm no expert on the Middlesex Regt, but a book that would help you out here is Ray Westlakes, "English & Welsh Infantry Regiments", which is basically an encyclopedia of our county regiments. In which he detail's the formation and movements of the Battalions concerned and any changes in title. So it may help you track the battalion up to the outbreak of the Great War.

For information regarding the Middlesex during the Great War, try a website called "The Long, Long Trail" and it's associated Forum called "The Great War Forum". I'm a member of the said group and I'm sure that our Middlesex followers would be only too pleased to help you with any enquiries.

Finally a "Regimental Depot" can be described as the Regiments homebased H.Q. and it's primary peacetime role was the recruitment, training and drafting men to the regular battalions of a Regiment or Corps who were serving away form their homebase. It also supported the Special Reserve and Territorials with a steady supply of regular soldiers, who in the main were Colour Sergeants as instructors.

Regimental Depot's themselves were innovation of the Cardwell Reforms of 1881, as prior to that Depots weren't static and could move from place to place as required by the regiment. With the formation of permanent Regimental Depot's within the County from which regiments recruited, a closer bond between County and Regiment was formed.

Depots also held Regimental Records and especially the Attestation Records of the men they had recruited and the Historical Records of the Regiment itself.

Hope this has answered at least some of your query,

Graham.

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  • 7 months later...

I'm looking for some information about the 4th Battalion, Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment) before the war. I'm also trying to figure out more about the British Army system, since it differs quite a lot from ours in Finland :D As I understand, they were at first stationed at Woolwich (where it was first raised in Feb, 1900), moving in 1901 to Aldershot. It was never outside the British Isles till it landed at Boulogne on August 14, 1914.

They were in Devonport in August 1914. Any information or accounts about the mobilisation day?

They were entrained for Southampton on 13 August, and embarked on the same day for France via SS Mombasa.

- What I wish to know what part did Mill Hill and Devonport played for this battalion?

- Exactly what is ment with term "Depot"? Some sort of assemly place or the headquarters?

- Where did they train?

- Possible biographies of the soldiers who served there before 1914 would also be welcome. Also period photographs.

Regards,

Tuomas

PS. This is for a graphic novel I'm working on.

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Hi, I am new to all this, I have posted a photo of my Great Grandad, born 1861, we believe that he was a Rough Rider,and may have been based at Woolwich, it says you are looking for photo's of soldiers, just thought you may be interested just to take a look,

Kind Regards Jeanette Newton.

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