Jump to content

China War Memorial Medal


Monkey King
 Share

Recommended Posts

Sometimes called the China War, War Memorial Medal, this medal was authorized by the Chinese Nationalist Government for issue to all servicemen and others who assisted the Chinese in their fight against Japan during the second World War. It was awarded to both military and civilian personnel who were directly involved in the war effort. Perhaps the largest single group of Americans to receive this medal were members of the 14th Air Force, the famed "Flying Tigers." This medal was presented to them in a special ceremony during a convention of the 14th Air Force Association held in New Orleans on August 2, 1975. The medals were formally presented to about 200 veterans by the Ambassador of the Republic of China and Anna Chennault, the widow of General Claire L. Chennault, the former commander of the Flyng Tigers.

Establishing Authority

This medal was established as the Medal in Commemoration of Victory in the Resistance Against Aggression, but is more commonly known as the China War Memorial Medal. It was established by the Republic of China in 1944 and issued October of 1946.

Acceptance by the United States

Acceptance of this medal was authorized in accordance with the provisions of Public Law 80-314, which authorized the acceptance of foreign awards and decorations during World War II for the period of December 7, 1941 through July 24, 1948.

Effective Dates

The effective dates of the China War Medal are December 8, 1941 to September 2, 1945.

Criteria

The China War Memorial Medal was awarded to all members of the Armed Forces of the United States who served in Mainland China, Burma, Vietnam, and Thailand, for at least thirty days between December 8, 1941 and September 2, 1945.

Order of Precedence

This medal is worn behind all foreign decorations. When worn with other foreign service medals, it worn in the chronological order in which they were received.

Devices

No devices are authorized for this medal.

Designer

The design for the China War Memorial Medal was set by the Government of the Republic of China.

Description and Symbolism

Obverse

The front of the medal shows the Marco Polo Bridge, which spans the Yeng-ding river. The bridge symbolizes the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War, because Japan's full-scale aggression against China began on July 7, 1937, near Peking in a small town called Lukou-Chiao, which means "Marco Polo Bridge." Above the bridge are the crossed flags of the Republic of China and her Armed Forces, symbolizing unity of the Chinese people. The portrait between the flags is that of Chiang Kai-shek, who was Chairman of the Military Committee of the National Government during the war. In the background over the bridge can be seen a city with smokestacks, alluding to the return of peaceful pursuits.

Reverse

The reverse of the medal contains a raised panel with the impressed notation, No. A, presumably to allow for the engraving of either the recipient's name or an issuing serial number. Above and below this panel are Chinese characters indicating the nature and purpose of the medal.

Ribbon

The ribbon contains a center stripe five-eighths of an inch wide, bordered on either side by a blue stripe one-eighth of an inch wide, and a red edge stripe three-sixteenths of an inch wide. A round metal Chinese sunburst emblem is placed in the center of the ribbon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sometimes called the China War, War Memorial Medal, this medal was authorized by the Chinese Nationalist Government for issue to all servicemen and others who assisted the Chinese in their fight against Japan during the second World War. It was awarded to both military and civilian personnel who were directly involved in the war effort. Perhaps the largest single group of Americans to receive this medal were members of the 14th Air Force, the famed "Flying Tigers." This medal was presented to them in a special ceremony during a convention of the 14th Air Force Association held in New Orleans on August 2, 1975. The medals were formally presented to about 200 veterans by the Ambassador of the Republic of China and Anna Chennault, the widow of General Claire L. Chennault, the former commander of the Flyng Tigers.

Establishing Authority

This medal was established as the Medal in Commemoration of Victory in the Resistance Against Aggression, but is more commonly known as the China War Memorial Medal. It was established by the Republic of China in 1944 and issued October of 1946.

Acceptance by the United States

Acceptance of this medal was authorized in accordance with the provisions of Public Law 80-314, which authorized the acceptance of foreign awards and decorations during World War II for the period of December 7, 1941 through July 24, 1948.

Effective Dates

The effective dates of the China War Medal are December 8, 1941 to September 2, 1945.

Criteria

The China War Memorial Medal was awarded to all members of the Armed Forces of the United States who served in Mainland China, Burma, Vietnam, and Thailand, for at least thirty days between December 8, 1941 and September 2, 1945.

Order of Precedence

This medal is worn behind all foreign decorations. When worn with other foreign service medals, it worn in the chronological order in which they were received.

Devices

No devices are authorized for this medal.

Designer

The design for the China War Memorial Medal was set by the Government of the Republic of China.

Description and Symbolism

Obverse

The front of the medal shows the Marco Polo Bridge, which spans the Yeng-ding river. The bridge symbolizes the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War, because Japan's full-scale aggression against China began on July 7, 1937, near Peking in a small town called Lukou-Chiao, which means "Marco Polo Bridge." Above the bridge are the crossed flags of the Republic of China and her Armed Forces, symbolizing unity of the Chinese people. The portrait between the flags is that of Chiang Kai-shek, who was Chairman of the Military Committee of the National Government during the war. In the background over the bridge can be seen a city with smokestacks, alluding to the return of peaceful pursuits.

Reverse

The reverse of the medal contains a raised panel with the impressed notation, No. A, presumably to allow for the engraving of either the recipient's name or an issuing serial number. Above and below this panel are Chinese characters indicating the nature and purpose of the medal.

Ribbon

The ribbon contains a center stripe five-eighths of an inch wide, bordered on either side by a blue stripe one-eighth of an inch wide, and a red edge stripe three-sixteenths of an inch wide. A round metal Chinese sunburst emblem is placed in the center of the ribbon.

I was awarded this medal however there is a device attached to both the medal drape as well as the ribbon. it is the silver and blue miniature Nationalist seal. I notice that the People's Revolutionary Military Museum has a copy of this medal in its listing on page 112 of their catalog. A hole appears on the drape of the ribbon where this device should be.

Dick

Edited by Richard LaTondre
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was awarded this medal however there is a device attached to both the medal drape as well as the ribbon. it is the silver and blue miniature Nationalist seal. I notice that the People's Revolutionary Military Museum has a copy of this medal in its listing on page 112 of their catalog. A hole appears on the drape of the ribbon where this device should be.

Dick

Hi Dick,

That is very interesting. Are you allowed to wear it or is it one of these keep sake type things?

Sun

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Dick,

That is very interesting. Are you allowed to wear it or is it one of these keep sake type things?

Sun

Yes I am allowed to wear it as it was awarded by an allied country for military services provided. It is worn in last place after all U.S. awards.

This specific award normally has a number on the reverse or in lack thereof a designated blank area for the engraving of any additional data. I also, as well as many other Marines, have received similar awards from other countries such as the Republic of Korea and Vietnam.

Welcome aboard and please tell us about yourself and the medals you collect.

Dick

Edited by Richard LaTondre
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...