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Piecing together clues from Mormon records (1881 Canadian Census etc) the most likely family for these two brothers seems to be:

Sons of lumberman Jabez Gorham Coops (born 26 July 1828 Milton, Queens, Nova Scotia, died 7 November 1899 Liverpool, Queens, Nova Scota, buried Milton Cemetery) married 28 July 1858 Port Moulton, Queens, Nova Scotia Sarah Marie Leslie (born 15 February 1839 Port Moulton, died 25 January 1910 Milton), and per the 1881 Canadian census (where name erroneously listed as "Coop" so bear that in mind for middle initials etc) they were Baptist "ethnic origin-English" with children:

Ida Mary, 22, milliner

Milford F., 20, lumberman

Porter, 16, lumberman (in school)

FRANK H., 15, lumberman (in school)

Annie F, 13, in school

John, 11, in school

Stanley, 7, in school

and

ALLISTER H, 5, in school

I could find nothing else on Frank (Social Security Death Index etc) but there was an additional entry on the unusually spelled Allister (normally Alistair)

Allister H. Coops, born 6 June 1876 Milton, Queens, Nova Scotia:

shown by the not always reliable/frequently unreliable Mormons as:

"killed in action in France 3 May 1917."

I'd say the combined pieces add up to a very good place to start, and might be worth checking with the town clerk or whoever keeps vital records in Canada at Milton, Nova Scotia on Frank, and what they have on Allister.

I find as a genealogist when you get odd names like these chances are you are indeed onto the right people, and Census takers were not particularly dutiful-- or literate necessarily!!!

I'll make another pass through and see if some other mangled spellings (Coop viz Coops and so on) may turn up more. I'd have expected any Nova Scotian in the U.S. Navy to have been from New England, not your coast-- but Frank (b. ca 1866 if that one didn't die and been replaced by a younger namesake-- in which case at 50 or so, I'd expect a "Lt USN" to have been an engineer) he was not serving from Connecticut. I have those records in the house. Will check on land-locked Vermont and coastal Maine. No computer access to coastal New Hampshire, Massachusetts or Rhode Island WW1 records. Back anon.

Not bad from a lamp, eh?

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A L U S T E R easily could be squooched "no one will notice the mistake" A L LI S T E R, as a peculiar spelling the engraver stumbled over. Not that many Coopses around! But I'll go look!

Back with no other suspects found, not that that proves anything. Mormon records are sketchy.

I'd suggest posting USN Lt Frank and his ships (transports I'd guess, since I find none listed as warships by Jane's) in the U.S. Forum.

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Hello George,

I?ve found 2 Coops? on the CWGC site, one from Canada and the other from the north of England. I wouldn?t be surprised if they were related.

Alister is down as dying on 5.5.17 aged 43.

The CWGC states that Alister Coops is buried west of Arras which is quite a way from St. Eloi which is south of Ypres and quite close to Plug Street. Is it possible that he was wounded at St. Eloi and was on the way to or in a base hospital when he died?

1039193 COOPS, Alister Harlow

Nationality: Canadian

Rank: Sergeant

Regiment: Canadian Overseas Railway Construction Corps

Unit: 3rd f Bn.

Age: 43

Date of Death: 05/05/1917

Son of Jabez G. and Sarah M. Coops.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave: II. H. 12. Cemetery, Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension, 15 kilometres north-west of Arras

Here?s the other Coop:

85670 COOPS, ARTHUR

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Private

Regiment: Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)

Unit: 29th Coy.

Age: 30

Date of Death: 10/04/1918

Son of Mrs. Jane Coops, of Brook St., Crewe; husband of Nellie Coops, of 26,

Primrose Avenue, Poplar Rd., Sparkhill, Birmingham.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Memorial Reference: Panel 11 Ploegstraat memorial

Tony

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Yes I'd say he was wounded at St. Eloi and died at a casualty clearing station as I just found this too:

From March 1916 to the Armistice, Aubigny was held by Commonwealth troops and burials were made in the extension until September 1918. The 42nd Casualty Clearing Station buried in it during the whole period, the 30th in 1916 and 1917, the 24th and 1st Canadian in 1917 (during the capture of Vimy Ridge by the Canadian Corps) and the 57th in 1918. The extension now contains 2,771 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and seven from the Second World War. There are also 227 French burials made prior to March 1916, and 64 German war graves. The extension was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

Tony

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  • 3 years later...

Have just come across this old thread and am curious about the object which started the quest for information.

I am related to the Coops family and have some details of this particular branch.

Sarah Maria Leslie married Jabez Gorham Coops and had: Ida May, Milford, Robert Porter, Frank Harvey, Annie Florence, John J., Guilford Stanley/Stanley Guilford, Allister Harlow. Ida, Milford, Robert, Frank, Annie all went to U.S. Guilford/Stanley lived in Calgary, Alberta.

Allister, according to family notes: "Killed in action- he did not die outright, but had a leg amputated in hospital and died of shock somewhat later. Headstone in Milton (Queens Co., Nova Scotia) Community Cemetery: Sgt. Allister H. Coops d.5 May 1917 aged 41 yrs.

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