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Translation Hilfe - "Fliegermasten"


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Hello Rick.

I join The Prussian of never having heard that term before.

The German Military Dictionary does, however list " Fliegermaske"-masken for plural or camouflage against air reconnaissance which would make sense in the context you indicate.. Could there be some error in the wording/spelling re. Fliegermasten?

Bernhard H. Holst

Edited by Bernhard H.Holst
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According to the the two possible words...

Eine Maske / plural: Masken (engl.: mask)

Ein Mast / plural: Masten (engl.: pole; or in electrical engeneering: pylon)

So I can´t see a sense in Fliegermasten, but in Fliegermasken. That would be a mask for pilots.

Edited by The Prussian
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I made a mistake; Bernhard and Andy would be correct, it should be "Fliegermasken" -I read the fraktur character for "k" as "t". Not a photo; It's from a paragraph in Königlich Bayerische Schwere Artillerie about artillery preparations for an upcoming offensive: "Vorbereitung von Fliegermasken und Deckungen gegen Sicht, Erkundung und Bestimmung der Beobachtungs= und Befehlsstellen"

I'm usually pretty good at reading fraktur, but the eyes get tired. :cool:

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Hi Rick,

Translating the whole phrase - "Preparation of aviator masks and cover from view, exploration and determination of observation = and command positions" - could it mean camouflage against detection by aircraft?

Bill

Edited by Bilco
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Bill, that's how I translate it as well. The passage describes selection of gun positions, including survey and fortification, including concealment. For an artilleryman, it's a very interesting passage about artillery preparations for an upcoming offensive.

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Hello readers.

As a little aside touching on this subject just a bit

WW I aviation made large and wide progress . Included were aerial reconnaissance, artillery spotter service, infantry support and such.

Some years ago the Munich auction house, Hermann Historica offered the military estate of a French airforce Brig.General who served as a N.C.O. pilot in WW I and made it to general officer at which rank he served in WW II. He lost a leg during a German bombing.. I advised a former officer of my regiment in Vietnam with whom I had been in touch, of this offer. I heard back that this officer was well known to his family in a friendship which went back to 1913. This pilot was an initial flight instructor of his father in 1913 who later served as an artillery spotter during WW I and maintained their friendship well into the future years.

Bernhard H. Holst

Edited by Bernhard H.Holst
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Bernhard, thanks for that info. I've been going through 251 Divisions and have noted several "Reconnaissance Flights" "Balloon Squadrons" "Artillery Observation Sections" At some point, I will do an article on aviation support to artillery. But this is a very long way away.

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