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Hello all,

I am just wondering if anyone has ever come across a set of embroidered WW2 British General battledress crossed sword and baton insignia.  If not, is there any supplier that can faithfully recreate this insignia.  Attached is a picture of Monty’s insignia for reference of what I am specifically looking for.

Cheers

Marcus

 

717D88A1-7903-474A-99AC-82AB8E4187C9.jpeg

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I believe there were only two Field Marshals during WWII, Monty and Slim, so the number of these manufactured from the time "Battledress, Serge" was introduced in 1937 until it was phased out in 1961 must have been very small.  I suspect authentic examples are quite rare and likely to be expensive even assuming you could find one.

There appear tom be several shops in the UK which sell repro. insignia, including one called "Monty's Locker".  They don't appear to stock general's insignia but perhaps they can steer you in the right direction.  Good luck with the hunt.

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6 hours ago, peter monahan said:

I believe there were only two Field Marshals during WWII, Monty and Slim, so the number of these manufactured from the time "Battledress, Serge" was introduced in 1937 until it was phased out in 1961 must have been very small.  I suspect authentic examples are quite rare and likely to be expensive even assuming you could find one.

There appear tom be several shops in the UK which sell repro. insignia, including one called "Monty's Locker".  They don't appear to stock general's insignia but perhaps they can steer you in the right direction.  Good luck with the hunt.

Thanks so much, I have been hunting for a pair of insignia such as this for years now and have not seen any that are remotely of the quality as those in the picture.  Those insignia I have found are usually just a flat embroidered pair and not raised embroidery and also lacking any of the detail within the sword and baton.  

Cheers,

M.

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Marcus

Sadly, I suspect that there simply isn't enough of a market for quality repros and originals are probably in the 'scarce as hen's teeth category'. :(

I have no idea how badly you want a pair, but friends who do Napoleonic era re-enacting with me [we're all staff officers, so useless sods] have had insignia custom embroidered in India.  They want gold wire and so on, but I suspect you can get anything you will pay for.  The trick is to get the makers clear patterns/pictures to work from and, perhaps, be prepared for some back and forth before you get what you want.  

Good luck on the hunt!

P.

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Thank you for the information Peter.  I have reached out to a company in London that manufactures insignia for the British Armed Forces as well as royal uniform insignia.  I am hoping that they may be able to recreate this insignia.  I re-create uniforms from WW2 and only will use period correct insignia manufactured identically to those of the originals.  Cost is not an issue as you pay for quality and workmanship I find.  I like my tunic recreations to be accurate in every way to the originals and typically spend a year researching each creation before assembly.  

Again thank you.

M.

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