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peter monahan

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peter monahan last won the day on January 7

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About peter monahan

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    British and Indian Military History and Militaria

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  1. What a shame! I suppose Durbin was in Nigeria in a training role? Perhaps associated with the setting up of the Staff College in Kaduna?
  2. Nice! I lived in West Africa for two years and always coveted at least one AGSM but not long after got married and invested all my 'spare' cash in silly things like rent and food. And children. That must have been the first campaign, then for a unit formed in 1901. I wonder if some canny Poilitical Officer or army liason type persuaded the Nawab to form this unit soit wouyld be available for African adventures? Paul's point is interesting too. I suspect you may have more luck researching the Somali CC, a much better known unit, I think. With luck, perhaps, references to the BC
  3. The Baloch Regiment had associations with the State Forces of Bahwalpur, which raised a Camel Transport Corp. Is that what you are referring to? In 1889, a small force from Bahawalpur was accepted as Imperial Service Troops, placing them at the disposal of the British for use in emergencies. However, it was not until the 20th century that these units began training on modern lines. In 1901, Bahawalpur State raised a camel baggage train with an escort of mounted infantry, called the Bahawalpur Imperial Service Mounted Rifles and Camel Transport Corps, which would go on to become the 1s
  4. Thanks, Stuka. Sounds like it's definitely not meant to be sat on by big people. I wonder when a European style chair became a sign of rank in the Congo? Peter
  5. Can you give us a better idea of the size, please?
  6. That is interesting! I wasn't aware that the MC was awarded for 'meritorious' as opposed to gallant service. Any idea howcommon this was?
  7. I can't see any image, Corey. Perhaps try again? Peter
  8. Sly The 35th Scinde Horse was a regular cavalry unit of the Indian Army in 1920. That meant that it had Indian ORs, NCOs and warrant officers - called Viceroy's Commissioned Officers - and British 'King's Commissioned Officers'. The VCOs were long service men, usually risen from the ranks and would serve as second in command to British officers in command of, for example, a troop or squadron. T Indian Cavalry Ranks: Ranks: Sowar [Trooper]; Naik [Corporal] ; Daffadar [Sergeant]. The Kot-Daffadar [Sgt Major] was Indian and the other VCOs were [Jemadar, roughly a lieutenant]; Risal
  9. Good call, I think. One washing with no negative effects. I might, if it were mine, try chesterpiglet's idea of using talcum powder. It might pick up dust and old oiul from the fur and probably won't dry out the underlying skin of the pelt unless you leave it in for a lengthy period. it seems to me - trained in theory but little practical experience - that this would fit the musuem standard of not doing anything nonreversable, nor adding anything to the actual artifact. And, of course, you're prepared for the fact that it was 'worn with pride' and will never be 'new Guardsman' standra
  10. Nice finds, Gordon. I wonder what event[s] in Poland in the mid-50s led to the issue of this commemorative in 1956?
  11. I don't collect to Zimbabwe but I know a bit of the history and it's my thought that the 'traditional' form is the right-facing eagle. But I may be wrong about that. Possible explanation for a switch to 'right' from 'left' is that it appears to have been a right on Rhodesian coinage and state emblems.
  12. James These buckles were first introduced as part of the waist belt for the British for the kit worn by there riflemen, starting in the early 1800s. It was, as Dev says, widely adopted and remained popular until the introduction of webbing equipment to replace leather - in 1908 in the UK. In fact, the leather belt with snake buckel, authorized or not - I'm not sure - stayed popular for 'walking out dress' throught WWI and was a sign of an old sweat, not a wartime recruit. I owned one for years - the belt I mean - and both Canadian soldiers and our RCMP wore it too. Here's a brief
  13. There are not very many uniforms that early and in decent condition left. In fact a friend of mine, Peter Twist of the firm Historical Twist, makes a large number of very high quality reproducations of Napoleonic era uniforms for collectors and museums in North America and Europe, because originals are simply unobtainable. I take it that the second coat is the Sherwood Yeomanry uniform?
  14. When I saw the title, I wasn't sure whether you meant a topi or old Sir Garnet Wolsey himself. If memory serves, a red over white hackle is usually Fusileers. Sadly that doesn't narrow it down too much. As to a flash, these seem to come and go, depending on things like the date the helmet was worn, where the unit was staioned - very popular in India, for example - and, I suspect, on the individual Colonel in command of a battalion. They are a lovley touch but require extra cost and, unlike the hackle, are a bit tough to remove in a hurry if they make one too conapicious. Can you
  15. It is technically called a 'Small Box Respirator' or 'SBR' for short and was developed and first issued by the British Army in late 1916. It was quickly adopted by Canadian, Australian and other Imperial troops as well, and was issued to the American 'doughboys' when they arrived in France in 1917. There should be a nose clamp inside the mask and a mouthpiece. Soldiers were expected to be able to don and secure the SBR in under ten seconds when a gas alarm went. [Every section of the front line trench would have a 'gas sentry' who carried a gas rattle or a 'gong' made from an old shel
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