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Medaille Militaire


Guest Darrell
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  • 2 months later...
Guest Darrell

Here's a bit of history, that might shed the light on when these were awarded:

Napoleon Bonaparte seized control of the republic in 1799, making himself First Consul. His armies engaged in several wars across Europe, conquered many countries and established new kingdoms with Napoleon's family members at the helm. Following his defeat in 1815, the French monarchy was re-established, which was then legislatively abolished and followed by a Second Republic in 1848. The Second Republic ended when the late Emperor's nephew, Louis-Napol?on Bonaparte, was elected President and proclaimed a Second Empire in 1852. Less ambitious than his uncle, the second Napoleon was also ultimately unseated, and republican rule returned for a third time in the Third Republic (1870).

Although ultimately a victor in World Wars I and II, France - much like Britain - suffered extensive losses in its empire, comparative economic status, working population, and status as a dominant nation-state. After World War II, the Fourth Republic was established. In 1958, it devised a semi-presidential democracy (known as the Fifth Republic) that has not succumbed to the instabilities experienced in earlier, more parliamentary regimes.

Edited by Darrell
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Guest Darrell

So the first one would have a time frame of 1870-1950ish

The second one from 1958-Present.

Big gap in time ... got your work cut out to narrow these down ...

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Guest Darrell

A little more on the history of the medal:

The M?daille militaire (Military Medal) is a decoration of the French Republic which was first instituted in 1852. The Military Medal is issued to any non-commissioned officer or enlisted personnel who distinguishes himself by acts of bravery in action against an enemy force. Commissioned officers are normally not elligible, but it may be awarded to Admirals and Generals for command prowess in the field. After the First World War, the Military Medal was also issued for receiving wounds in combat.

The M?daille militaire is one of rarest French decorations to be bestowed upon foreigners, in contrast to such medals as the Croix de guerre. During the Second World War, the Medal of Merit reached its highest numbers of foreign bestowals, most often to members of the British Army as well as to the United States military. The decoration is considered, in both countries, to be the equivalent of a Meritorious Service Medal

In addition to the individual medal, the M?daille militaire is also authorized as a unit award to those military commands who display the same criteria of bravery as would be required for the individual medal. The unit award is known as the Fourrag?re of the M?daille militaire and is worn as a cord suspended from the shoulder of a military uniform. the decoration may be permanently worn by those who were members of a military unit when the heroic action was performed. For those on temporary status, or who joined a unit after the cited action, the fourrag?re is worn temporarly and must be surrendered upon transfer from the unit.

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