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The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers - (***MODERATORS' CHOICE)

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Recently a fellow memeber 'Donald' posted some superb photo's of the 2nd Bn, Northumberland Fusiliers taken in India c.1891, fortunately for me I was offered these photo's for my collection, which were gratefully accepted and among them was this one, which Donald hadn't posted - a beautiful head and shoulders CDV of a young Sgt of the 2nd Bn, again wearing the IGSM and Campaign Bar "Hazara 1891". A superb study of a British Soldier serving overseas in India, I just wish I had many more like this.

Edited by Graham Stewart

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Sometime ago I posted views of a lovely scarlet patrol jacket, which I have in my collection(Post #277) and today I have the pleasure of posting a photo of the same pattern scarlet patrol jacket being worn. However there is more to this photo than I first realised.

The photo taken by Cox of Ripon, Yorks was taken in either 1907 or 1908, where the 'Northumberland Volunteer Brigade' held their Annual Camp two years running. The Brigade consisted of the 1st, 2nd & 3rd Volunteer Bn's, Northumberland Fusiliers and 5th V.B., Durham L.I., and the Captain in this photo is serving with the 2nd V.B., N.F. and we know this from the fact that of the three Volunteer Battalion only two were clothed in scarlet(2nd & 3rd), but only the 2nd V.B. wore 'Gosling Green' facings, the 3rd V.B. wore 'white' facings.

Taking into consideration the age of the Captain - could this actually be the owner of my patrol jacket - Q.M. & Hon. Captain J. O'Neill, 2nd V.B., N.F.? Whereas my collar badges appear to have been added later and no South African War medal ribbon appears to have been sewn to it - it would be spooky if it were his jacket.

Edited by Graham Stewart

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Dear Gents,

Concerning the Northumberland Fusiliers, I was wondering if anyone has War Diaries of the 19th Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers ( pioneer Bn) of begin November 1918. They made a dump of rivercrossing material in the village of Ingoyghem (Flanders).
I 'm dying to know the mapcoordinates of this dump.
With kind regards from Flanders, have a heartwarming Christmas
Jef

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Jef - You've probably seen this from the 19th Bn History, which is an abridged version of the Bn War Diary. I think you may find that the original is available on-line from the National Archives, but they may not include the co-ordinates of the material dump, as it does appear that the proposed 'crossing' never took place as the Germans had retreated on the 8th November, leaving the Bn to assist with the approaches to a Pontoon Bridge built by the R.E.

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attachicon.gifscan0001 (Large).jpg

Jef - You've probably seen this from the 19th Bn History, which is an abridged version of the Bn War Diary. I think you may find that the original is available on-line from the National Archives, but they may not include the co-ordinates of the material dump, as it does appear that the proposed 'crossing' never took place as the Germans had retreated on the 8th November, leaving the Bn to assist with the approaches to a Pontoon Bridge built by the R.E.

Thank you Graham. I got the information from the Divisional History of the 35th Div. I never had the opportunity to see this Rgtal History of the 19th NF.

If I PM my mailaddress would you mind to send me a scan of page 146 and 148? I'm also interested in other information which might appear in your book. I'm working on a study about the last days of WWI and every info is welcome. That's right, the Germans started their retreat on 8 November 1918 . The big allied attack would start on Monday 11 November... as the Germans retreated Second and Fifth Armies followed. But the river Scheldt was a difficult obstacle.There were not fierce fightings but, this southern side of the Scheldt are keeping many Portland CWGC headstones.

Merry Christmas,

Jef

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Thank you Graham. I got the information from the Divisional History of the 35th Div. I never had the opportunity to see this Rgtal History of the 19th NF.

If I PM my mailaddress would you mind to send me a scan of page 146 and 148? I'm also interested in other information which might appear in your book. I'm working on a study about the last days of WWI and every info is welcome. That's right, the Germans started their retreat on 8 November 1918 . The big allied attack would start on Monday 11 November... as the Germans retreated Second and Fifth Armies followed. But the river Scheldt was a difficult obstacle.There were not fierce fightings but, this southern side of the Scheldt are keeping many Portland CWGC headstones.

Merry Christmas,

Jef

Thank you for all yhe help, Graham. Great Information.

Jef

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Hi, I am new to this site and I was wondering if somebody is able to identify a badge? The badge in question is on the arm of the L'Cpl in the centre of the pic and is the middle 'V' shaped one. In post 195, page 10 of this blog it is identified as a badge officers and other ranks wear. I was really just wondering what the purpose of the badge was considering the solders already had their ranks on their arms anyway?

Many thanks to anyone that can help!

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Alison - The badge in question was to identify that the wearer was a member of the "Royal Nothumberland Fusiliers" and was a regimental designation used solely during WWII. I've tried to download your group photo, but alas it's becomes very blurred when I try to blow it up, as I'm trying to identify the Divisional cloth badge being worn above the RNF square, from that I may be able to identify which battalion of RNF it is. Looking at the size and shape, although blurred, it appears to that of 46th Division, which is a tree, and if thats the case then it'll be the 2nd Bn, RNF, which were the "Support Battalion"(i.e. Heavy Weapons Battalion) of the Division in North Africa from 3rd July 1943-10th March 1944.

The red 'V' within the square related to the RNF's old title as the "5th of Foot" and the funny coloured square is infact 'gosling green', which was the old 'facing' colour of their cuffs and collars, when clothed in scarlet. If you follow this link it'll take you to a site explaining the history of the RNF;-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Northumberland_Fusiliers

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Here is my next pick up.... A very young looking officer from the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers :). Picture made by Ramsden.

218811139f382d_o.jpg

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Been a while since I've been here, but since then two more items of dress have come my way for the Northumberlands, the first of which is a 'Regular' officers scarlet jacket.

Sadly it's rather moth damaged, but considering I haven't got one then I'm not worried because this does have a bit of history to it.

It's actually named to 'E.H.(Ernest Henry) Baxter(No.4286)', who it turns out was commisioned into the N.F. prior to the Great War and whom served with both the 1st & 2nd Bn's. To save on extensive writing here's a resume of his career from the London Gazette and Army List

Gentleman Cadet - Royal Military College - 1908

2nd/Lt - Northumberland Fusiliers - 24/10/1908.

Joined 1st Bn, N.F., Peshawur, India - January 1909.

Lieut 1st Bn, N.F. - 1/10/1911

Joined 2nd Bn, N.F. - November 1913.

temp Capt - 2nd Bn, N.F. - 17/11/1914

While a Capt'n with the 2nd Bn, he commanded 'D' Coy and was severly wounded on the outskirts of Ypres, when the Battalion was on the way to relieve the 1st Welch in trenches at Zonnebeke. Ironically his wounding occurred on the 23rd April 1915, 'St. Georges Day' - the Regimental Day for all Northumberlands.

The wounds were severe enough for him to remain in the U.K. and on recovery he graded as a Staff Capt'n and seconded to command a Company of an OFFICER CADET UNIT(18/12/1916).

No more is known of him until he's found on a Special Appointment - CL FF on the 30th November 1918, which he relinquished in May 1919.

Edited by Graham Stewart

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The cuff showing clearly the gold lace of a 'regular' officer

Capt Baxter seems to have continued to serve with the Army, but I have yet to trace his movements, because he's known to have gone onto retired pay on the 3rd October 1935.

However with war looming and the need for experienced officers, despite their age, Capt Baxter joins the REGULAR ARMY RESERVE OF OFFICERS(R.A.R.O.), becoming a Major on the 5th September 1938.

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Collar badge clearly showing the silver St.George & Dragon on the gold bullion grenade, and sadly some of the mothing.

Major Baxter went onto retired pay on the 11th May 1940, but it wasn't for long, because on the 23rd February 1941 he was recalled to duty, remployed and restored to the rank of Major.

At this stage I'm unsure as to what eventually happened to Major Baxter, but I'm sure I'll learn more as time goes on.

Edited by Graham Stewart

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Now for an interesting feature - the rank. The rank clearly displayed here is that of a 'Lieutenant' on a gold bullion shoulder board. What this implies is that Lieut E.H. Baxter, 2nd Bn, Northumberland Fusiliers, put his jacket into storage in August 1914 - 'and never wore it again' - until eventually found in a loft and ending up in my collection.

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Some years ago I bought 1913 pattern 'band' jacket, which was dated and named for 1938. Recently a second such jacket came my way but with the actual band wings sewn to it. The jacket was advertised as being 'Norfolk' Regiment, which it clearly wasn't.

Edited by Graham Stewart

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An unusual feature of this jacket is that for some unknown reason only four regimental pattern buttons have been sewn to the skirt, when 'six' was the norm for this pattern. Despite a thorough search for evidence that the buttons had been removed there is none, so rather than add the 'two' to complete the skirt, I'll leave it as it came.

Edited by Graham Stewart

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Another unusual feature of these two band jackets was the fact that both had been adopted for wear by a N.F./R.N.F. Territorial Battalion and the shoulder straps had been punctured possibly using a 'lace hole' tool!!.

It was obvious that the one piece shoulder titles - 'N/BOMB/F' had been taken into use. However despite trying to get the traditional 'T/numerals' to fit to restore the jacket nothing would fit. On looking closer at the strap it then dawned on me that the one type of title to fit would be the plain greatcoat 'T' which is double lugged and often seen in post-WWI photo's being worn with Service Dress.

The next was to figure out which Battalion it belonged to and in a good light it appeared that a seperate figure '5' was worn. Luckily I have spare 'T's and numerals so these have now been attached.

Edited by Graham Stewart

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A close up of the title. This particular 'N/BOMB/F' has the lugs mounted in an unusual place - along the top bar, below the flame and it's the only shoulder title I have of many that would fit these punctured holes.

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My first N.F. Band jacket as originally seen in post #13 on this Forum - note the absence of the band wings, which are sewn onto the new addition.

Edited by Graham Stewart

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Only my first jacket has the manufacturers label in it, and only the remnants remain in the new jacket;-

SHIRLEY BROOKS Ltd

41 & 42 ARTILLERY PLACE

WOOLWICH

Below that it reads;-

T.Crawford

769 - 20/4/1938

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Hi lads - back again and with a lovely CDV depicting 'E' Company of the 3rd(Militia)Bn, Northumberland Fusiliers taken July 1908.

'E' Company was actually commanded by Captain & Honorary Major Lindberg, who is seated on our left of the photo and this information is gleaned from the reverse of the CDV itself.

Monday 6th July 1908 saw the 3rd(Militia)Bn, parade for it's annual training at The Camp, Alnwick, Northumberland with 800 all ranks present, commanded by it's Colonel Lord Algernon Percy, A.D.C.. Other officers present were;-

Major Roddam

Major Scott

Capt & Hon Major Lindberg

Capt Roundell

Capt Hutton-Squire

Capt Burdon

Capt The Honorable J.A. Joicey

Capt N.T. Lloyd

Capt M. Lloyd

Capt C.P. Hawkes

Lieut A.W. Percy

Lieut C.W. Wheler

Lieut The Honorable S.J. Joicey

Lieut Forster

Lieut Waddilove

Lieut Lambert

2nd/Lt Lamb

2nd/Lt Anne

Capt & Adjutant A.W. Rickman

The great and the good of Northumberland society.

However this would be the last occassion on which the battalion would appear as a 'Militia' Battalion because as of the 1st August 1908 the Battalion was abolished under the Territorial & Reserve Forces act only to rise again as the 3rd(Special Reserve)Bn, Northumberland Fusiliers.

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Hi. Sorry for the terrible picture but this drum belongs to a relative and I was wondering if anyone would be able to give us more details about it? These are the only markings we could find on it.

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Hi. Sorry for the terrible picture but this drum belongs to a relative and I was wondering if anyone would be able to give us more details about it? These are the only markings we could find on it.

Pre-1930 for definite, but as to when Hawkes, became Hawkes & Son is difficult to say. Try the net as you may be able to establish when they were at that address.

Update - seems they were at that address from 1889-1895.

Edited by Graham Stewart

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