Michael Johnson

Another Piece of the Family Puzzle

11 posts in this topic

ID: 1   Posted (edited)

While doing some genealogical research, I found this site: http://sippaf.ish-lyon.cnrs.fr/Documents/p...07436Doc322.pdf

He was my great-grandfather. Now I have a confirmed Franco-Prussian War veteran in the family. The Medal wasn't authorized until 1910, and there was a medal for the defenders of Belfort. He may not have received either. Certainly there were no medals in his son's estate (I have written about Capitaine Marcel Verzieux, who was French Engineers and served at Verdun).

Now I have to dig out the old photo albums and see if I can find him in uniform.

Of the other people named in the obituary, Antonin Gautier was killed in 1918 with SPA80, so his graduation from the ?cole centrale lyonnaise was posthumous.

Edmond Mathieu I remember from my childhood. There was an adrien helmet and a rifle (which I believe I was told by my mother was Franco-Prussian) at the family chalet at Seyssins. I believe he was infantry during the war.

Edited by Michael Johnson

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Cool.

Is there a regimental history?

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Great obituary, a courageous, patriotic, intelligent and humble man devoted to his community. My compliments!

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ID: 5   Posted (edited)

Thanks TacHel. The Verzieux side of the family isn't very well documented, not helped by the fact that only two of the four children married, and one of the sons was killed in 1918. My aunt did much research into the Darte side, of whom there are dozens of cousins, descended from Edmond Mathieu, who married a Darte.

Edited by Michael Johnson

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Found one! Now I just have to find time to scan it. The identification in the album is obviously by my aunt, but since she was born in 1912 and he died in 1928, it is likely that she had met him.

It's after his commission, as he has the elaborate sleeve braid.

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Well done, Michael!

The most militant of my ancestors was, apparently, a Private in the 21st Battaslion, CEF who joined in 1916, saw six months service in the trenchs in 1918 and was invalided out to England (and late getting back to Canada) with Pleurisy. "Cause of Ilness" in his records reads simply "trenches". I'm envious of your distinguisehd forebear!

Peter

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ID: 8   Posted (edited)

Peter, I have the recent regimental history of the 21st, so send me name rank and number, and I'll see if I can get him to "talk" :rolleyes:

The Johnson side of the family was less martial:

Grandfather John joined the C.A.S.C. in 1916, invalided after pneumonia and loss of an eye (his brother-in-law says the anaethetist spilled the ether, as G.D. was thrashing about).

Great-Uncle Matthew joined the 166th Bn. in 1916, invalided after refusing to have a hernia operated on (because of what happened to his brother????)

Great uncle Edward didn't enlist and wasn't drafted. Heart condition downcheck?

Father John joined the Ontario Regiment (Tank) Reserve Army, after M.O.s opinion that to pass him as fit for overseas service would be a service offence of "aid and comfort to the enemy" (Dad was very nearsighted).

Edited by Michael Johnson

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Father John joined the Ontario Regiment (Tank) Reserve Army, after M.O.s opinion that to pass him as fit for overseas service would be a service offence of "aid and comfort to the enemy" (Dad was very nearsighted).

:lol: LMAO!

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And here is the man himself, in his younger days.

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Miraculously, given that he was Militia, my father's service record exists.

I don't blame the MO - my father's eyesight was 20/200.

Michael

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