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RMLI OR Full-Dress tunic, dated 1895. The GC&LS 'undetected crime' stripes are original to the tunic (21 years as a private !).

rmtuni10.jpg

rmtuni11.jpg

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The original photograph of the Captain used for the above print. He is wearing the Egypt 1882-1884 Medal (with at least one clasp) and Khedive Star.

I got this picture among a lot of photographs taken during the (?) Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897.

rmliof10.jpg

That's all for now.

Eric

Edited by The Saint

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Just caught up with this thread again. Some excellent early images Saint, thanks.

Here's a recent addition to my collection showing a Captain Smythe wearing the full dress uniform which most of our members will be more familier with.

I believe that this dates from the 1930s but I'm not 100% on his medal, the ribbon looks similar to the 37 coronation medal but the suspension clasp is wrong. And as always seems to be the case the camera flash obscures the actual medal detail. Any idea's please Gentlemen?

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Here's another new one showing a Royal Marine detachment onboard ship. No ideas to the ship's identity unfortunately.

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Okay, I can understand the colored service caps, but, bearskins? They didn't also slug around their full dress with them when in service dress, did they? Or did they wear the bearskin with service dress?

~TS

Bearskins are still worn with Barrack Dress or whatever as a means of getting used to wearing the things before parades - could be that they were worn for spells on route marches fpr the same purpose.

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A good thought Leigh, although should'nt he have a victory aswell.

Straying back to the subject of wearing bearskin caps with barrack dress, prior to every Royal Palace Guard mount a check parade would be carried out wearing barrack dress and bearskin's. One of the main reasons for this was to allow for the correct sizing of the Guard as the bearskins can vary in height slightly and so the tallest man on parade may not end up as the right hand man and so on :cheers:

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A good thought Leigh, although should'nt he have a victory aswell.

Straying back to the subject of wearing bearskin caps with barrack dress, prior to every Royal Palace Guard mount a check parade would be carried out wearing barrack dress and bearskin's. One of the main reasons for this was to allow for the correct sizing of the Guard as the bearskins can vary in height slightly and so the tallest man on parade may not end up as the right hand man and so on cheers.gif

I recall having seen a photograph of a guardsman wearing his bearskin and the 1902 service dress during, I believe, the 1912 coal strike. It was standard practice for troops prior to 1914 to wear the full dress headgear (Home Service helmet, Kilmarnock, feather bonnet, etc) with service dress when in aid of the civil power (strikes, riots, etc). Troops also wore their full dress headgear and service dress when changing station.

.

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Royal Marine Concert Party, Bedenham, 1919.

The only photos, I think, in which I've seen the Royal Marine Artillery offcers two piece OSD badge with crossed cannon barrels worn above the globe & laurel wreath.

The badge isn't referred to in "Kipling & King" & I have'nt seen reference to it elsewhere.

Two officers wearing grenade over globe & laurel wreath, & with globe & laurel wreath collar badges,one wearing crossed cannon barrels over globe & laurel wreath & with the RA / RE style grenade collar badges with RMA (I think) on scroll.

Edited by leigh kitchen

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A member of the Royal Marine Engineers, given that the other photo of the pair bears the information re RME Concert Party, Bedenham, 1919.

As RME he wears the gilding metal RMLI collar badge as a cap badge, in white metal it would be the badge of the RM Police.

The officer looks to be wearing the grenade over globe & laurel wreath cap badge?

The other two men wear non-regulation headgear.

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A good thought Leigh, although should'nt he have a victory aswell....

The BWM could be awarded on its own, without the Stars or VM, if the recpient had served but not seen any action.......

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Shoulder patches of The Royal Marine Division, from 1945 worn by The 116th (Royal Marine) Infantry Brigade.

116th (RM) Bde consisted of the 17th, 28th & 30th Battalions Royal Marines, & was one of two conventional infantry brgades raised that year (the other beng 117th (RM) Infantry Bde)

It served with 21st Army Group in NW europe.

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A gold anopdised badge sprayed a bronze / black colour by a RM who'd lost his bronzed badge (in Northern Ireland in 1979):

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Officers St Edwards Crown two - piece bronzed badge for wear in the green beret (note the crown has been broken off & is missing from the lions head):

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A Royal Marines, non-Commando, beret. This one is dated 1945, so it must have been issued in the immediate post-war period.

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RMLI OR Full-Dress tunic, dated 1895. The GC&LS 'undetected crime' stripes are original to the tunic (21 years as a private !).

Why 21 years? According to my research the RM [both branches] followed army rules for GC badges, which would mean at that period max. 18 years, min. 16 years [for continuous good behaviour] ..... ? At that time, 4 chevrons were commonplace, for example many bandsment all services were long serving and promotion was very slow.

rmtuni10.jpg

rmtuni11.jpg

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