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UK soldier dies in southern Iraq Sunday 11th September 2005

The injured soldiers are being treated at a field hospital

One British soldier has been killed and three others injured in an attack in Iraq's Basra province, the Ministry of Defence has confirmed.

A spokesman in Basra, southern Iraq, told the BBC the casualties were being treated at Britain's Shaibah base.

A BBC correspondent in Baghdad said a roadside bomb had been detonated as the soldiers' convoy passed. The MoD said an investigation was ongoing.

The death brings the number of UK soldiers killed in Iraq to 95.

In a statement, the MoD said the fatal attack took place at approximately 11.15 (0815 BST).

As always, my thoughts are with the family, and the families of those injured, in this appalling act of violence

John Reid

Defence Secretary

"Our thoughts and prayers are with the family at this difficult time," it said.

Speaking from Kosovo, where he is visiting British troops, Defence Secretary John Reid sent his condolences.

He said: "I was greatly saddened to hear this morning of the death of a British soldier on duty in Iraq.

"As always, my thoughts are with the family, and the families of those injured, in this appalling act of violence."

The Shaibah base, about 10 miles south-west of Basra, is the British logistics headquarters in Iraq.

On 5 September two British soldiers were also killed by a roadside bomb as they travelled in a convoy five miles east of the base.

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MoD names soldier killed in Iraq

Major Bacon, known as Matt, is the 95th UK soldier to die in Iraq

A British soldier killed in an attack in the southern Iraqi city of Basra on Sunday has been named by UK officials.

The Ministry of Defence said Major Matthew Bacon, who was 34 and from the London area, died when a roadside bomb hit the vehicle he was travelling in.

Major Bacon's parents said he was a hero whom they believed invincible and that he had served in many conflict zones around the world.

Three other soldiers badly hurt in the blast are now out of danger.

We would be very grateful to everyone if our family and friends could be left in peace to come to terms with our very sad loss

Major Bacon's family statement

The MoD said that they were still being treated at a field hospital in Britain's Shaibah base.

Major Bacon's family said in a statement: "We have always understood the risks attached to Matthew's career but never imagined that anything could or would happen to our son.

"We are immensely proud of Matthew, of the leader he became, the lives of people he touched directly and indirectly and the good work he did throughout his career.

"We would be very grateful to everyone if our family and friends could be left in peace to come to terms with our very sad loss."

Improvised device

Major Bacon's death brings the number of UK soldiers killed in Iraq to 95.

In a statement, the MoD said the fatal attack took place at approximately 11.00 (0815 BST) on Sunday when an armoured Snatch Landrover was attacked with an improvised device.

"Our thoughts and prayers are with the family at this difficult time," it said.

An Iraqi civilian was also injured in the attack and was taken to an Iraqi hospital for treatment.

As always, my thoughts are with the family, and the families of those injured, in this appalling act of violence

John Reid

Defence Secretary

Speaking from Kosovo on Sunday, where he is visiting British troops, Defence Secretary John Reid sent his condolences.

He said: "I was greatly saddened to hear this morning of the death of a British soldier on duty in Iraq.

"As always, my thoughts are with the family, and the families of those injured, in this appalling act of violence."

The Shaibah base, about 10 miles south-west of Basra, is the British logistics headquarters in Iraq.

On 5 September two British soldiers were also killed by a roadside bomb as they travelled in a convoy five miles east of the base.

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The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died in Shaibah, Iraq, on Sept. 26, when an improvised explosive device detonated near their HMMWV during convoy operations. They were also attacked by enemy forces using small arms fire. Both soldiers were assigned to the Army National Guard's 2nd Battalion, 127th Infantry Regiment, 32nd Infantry Brigade, Fond du Lac, Wis.

Killed were:

Sgt. Andrew P. Wallace, 25, of Oshkosh, Wis.

Spc. Michael J. Wendling, 20, of Mayville, Wis.

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Sgt. Andrew P. Wallace, 25, of Oshkosh, Wis.

Wednesday, September 28 2005 @ 08:17 AM EST

Contributed by: tomw Oshkosh Northwestern -- An Oshkosh soldier killed in Operation Iraqi Freedom is being remembered for his love of family and country and for his dedication as a teacher and wrestling coach.

Sgt. Andrew Wallace, 25, was killed by a roadside bomb, while he helped escort a convoy of supply trucks in Iraq, his father, Pete Wallace, said Tuesday.

Wallace said his son joined the Army National Guard in part to help pay for college costs, but he also had a deep and lasting patriotism for his country.

“He was proud to serve his country and he knew the risks that came with it,” said Wallace, who lives in the Dodge County community of Fox Lake. “Everything he did, he did with enthusiasm. He enjoyed sports with enthusiasm and he loved his country with enthusiasm.”

He said his son was in good spirits when he last talked to him via cell phone about a week ago.

“He called me at work,” Wallace said. “He preferred being out on the missions instead of being back in the base.”

Wallace served with the Wisconsin Army National Guard 2nd Battalion, 127th Infantry Regiment based in Appleton.

Also killed by the roadside bomb in Shaibah, Iraq, was Spc. Michael Wendling, 20, of Mayville, who was driving the Humvee that he, Wallace and another soldier were riding in near Basra at the time of the explosion, Wendling’s father, Randy Wendling, said Tuesday. Wallace was the team leader who normally sits in the front passenger seat. The third soldier, who was injured, served as a gunner.

Major Gen. Albert H. Wilkening of the Wisconsin National Guard said he has ordered flags of all Wisconsin National Guard armories, air bases and other facilities lowered to half-staff in memory of Wallace and Wendling.

Wallace, a physical education teacher since 2003 who taught at Oshkosh North High School and Emmeline Cook Elementary School, was deployed to Kuwait and Iraq in June. His father said Wallace was a member of the National Guard for about six years.

Pete Wallace recalled the last time he saw his son, which was June 9 for a sendoff at Volk Field at Camp Douglas in western Wisconsin. He said family members gave him hugs, plenty of love and told him to stay safe before he departed.

“He wanted to come home as a veteran,” Wallace said.

Wallace’s father said funeral arrangements are pending.

Overall, 46 Wisconsin military members have died during the war in Iraq and so have more than 1,900 U.S. troops nationwide. Local soldiers who died include Pfc. Brent Vroman of Omro, who was a member of the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve and Army Reserve Capt. Benjamin Jansky of Oshkosh.

Wallace’s death was a shock to those who knew him, including wrestlers at North, where he was an assistant wrestling coach.

“He was there for us all of the time and whenever we had a problem we could go to him. He was easy going and fun to be around,” said senior Nick Wolff, a member of the North wrestling team. “He taught us to respect everybody no matter what happened to us.”

Wallace was a 1998 graduate of Ripon High School where he played football, baseball and wrestled. His father said Wallace also was a WIAA football official and had been an avid fan of the Green Bay Packers.

Lucas Seelow, a senior at North and a member of the wrestling team, said Wallace put a smile on the faces of wrestlers.

“He liked the sport and enjoyed being out there with us,” Seelow said. “He was at school at 6:30 each morning to help anyone who wanted to lift weights and to give his support.”

Gary Westerman, former head wrestling coach at North, said Wallace’s enthusiasm was contagious.

“Andrew was the ultimate kid at heart. He was never in a bad mood and always smiling and had positive things to say,” said Westerman, who is a physical education teacher at a Kimberly Middle School. “He was an all-around great guy and a great friend.”

Westerman said Wallace was proud to be in the military and often talked about it. He said Wallace and his wife had just purchased a house in Oshkosh.

“He was real excited about that,” Westerman said. “He couldn’t wait to have me over.”

Phil Marshall, principal at Emmeline Cook, said Wallace kept in contact with school staff via a Web site.

“He would take pictures of all the missions he was on and would post them on the Web site so we could get a look at what was going on,” Marshall said. “He sent e-mails to staff updating what was happening in Iraq. It was really a comfort to us to have contact with him on a regular basis.”

Marshall said Wallace was an extraordinary person.

“He made an impact on everyone in school from students to staff and parents,” Marshall said. “He always had a smile on his face and a positive attitude. The lack of that energy has left a big hole here.”

http://www.legacy.com/AZCENTRAL/Soldiers.a...rsonID=15235097

Edited by bigjarofwasps

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Spc. Michael J. Wendling, 20, of Mayville, Wis.

Wednesday, September 28 2005 @ 08:13 AM EST

Contributed by: tomw

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel -- The news passed through the stands Monday evening at the Mayville High School JV football game - Michael Wendling, who played on the football, basketball and golf teams and joined the military while still a student, had been killed in Iraq.

Among the words murmured by stunned people as the football game unfolded before them: explosion, Iraq, Humvee, Mayville.

"In typical small-town fashion, it had drifted through the town," said Mayville High School Principal Lee Zarnott. "Unfortunately, bad news travels fast."

Wendling, 20, a specialist, was killed Monday with Sgt. Andrew P. Wallace, 25, of Oshkosh when a roadside bomb exploded as they drove past it in Iraq. They were members of Fond du Lac-based Charlie Company of the Wisconsin National Guard 2nd Battalion, 127th Infantry Regiment. Their deaths bring to 47 the number of Wisconsin service members killed in Iraq since March 2003.

A high school friend of Wendling's, Spc. Jeremy Roskopf of Brownsville, suffered shrapnel wounds to his legs.

Roskopf and Wendling signed up for the National Guard together while they were in high school. They played on the Mayville golf team, which won the conference championship their senior year.

Wendling, who was on the dean's list at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee when his unit was activated, frequently kept in touch with his family via e-mail and talked about what it was like to drive the large, heavy Humvees in Kuwait and Iraq, said his father, Randy Wendling.

"He said they don't go very fast, but he seemed pretty excited about what he was doing," Randy Wendling said in a phone interview Tuesday.

The Appleton-based 2nd Battalion, 127th Infantry Regiment was activated in June and trained at Camp Shelby, Miss. The unit moved to Kuwait in mid-August and has been based in northern Kuwait, providing security to convoys traveling from Kuwait into Iraq, said Wisconsin National Guard Lt. Col. Tim Donovan.

Wendling's father said the roadside bomb hit his son's Humvee near Basra, in southern Iraq. Wendling was the driver, Roskopf was the gunner who stands in the middle of the vehicle and Wallace was the team leader, who normally sits in the front passenger seat.

Randy Wendling said he saw his son shortly before the unit deployed overseas last month. He spent his home leave going to Brewers games, visiting with family and friends and golfing.

His son was upbeat in his e-mails and enjoyed serving in the Wisconsin National Guard, the elder Wendling said.

"He talked about where they were based and what it was like, what they were going to be doing, how hot it was there," said Randy Wendling.

In his last e-mail, received a couple of days before he died, Wendling asked about a care package his family sent him that included bedsheets and beef jerky and told his folks that his company was very busy.

Stu Strook coached Wendling in junior varsity football and golf and remembered a guy who wasn't the most talented athlete but someone who worked hard to improve himself. It was common to see Wendling hitting buckets of golf balls, even after matches, until dark.

"I would call him a grinder. He worked hard. He had a good heart," said Strook.

Wendling also liked to eat. He wasn't fat, so sometimes his teammates wondered where he put all the food. Strook recalled returning from a golf match one day when the team stopped at Burger King. Wendling ordered a Whopper Value Meal with fries and a drink. Nothing unusual about that, except that Wendling went back for four more Whoppers - quarter-pound burgers - and ate them all, to the astonishment of everyone watching him, Strook said.

"Mike was a personality, I guess you would say. He had a great sense of humor. He was a kid who liked to have fun, and kids liked to be around Mike because he was so much fun," said Strook.

Wendling had not declared a major at UWM, but his father said he was leaning toward getting a degree in the sciences. His high school marketing teacher, Rod McSorley, said he thought Wendling would have become an engineer.

A couple of dozen marketing students from Mayville organized a trip to New York their senior year. The group took in the sights, visited Madison Square Garden and saw "The Lion King" on Broadway. A photo of the group taken on the Staten Island Ferry is pinned to a bulletin board in McSorley's office. McSorley said he was looking at the picture of Wendling and his classmates mugging for the camera as he talked to a reporter Tuesday about his former student.

"When we visited New York, we visited ground zero, and that was important to him. He was close enough to 9-11 to embrace its importance," said McSorley. "He had very good family values. That wouldn't surprise me (that) he had the feeling of giving back."

http://www.legacy.com/PE/Soldiers.asp?Page...rsonID=15240017

Edited by bigjarofwasps

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Death of a British Officer in Iraq - Captain Ken Masters

Published Sunday 16th October 2005

It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm that the body of Captain Ken Masters was discovered in his accommodation in Waterloo Lines, Basra, Iraq on Saturday 15 October 2005.

Captain Masters was Officer Commanding 61 Section, Special Investigation Branch, Royal Military Police. He had been responsible for the investigation of all in-theatre serious incidents plus investigations conducted by the General Police Duties element of the Theatre Investigation Group.

Ken Masters was aged 40, married with two children and had served with the Royal Military Police since 1981. He was commissioned from the ranks in 2001 and served most of his career with the Special Investigation Branch.

The Ministry of Defence asks the media to respect the privacy of Captain Master's family at this time.

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UK soldier killed by Basra bomb

97 UK soldiers have died in Iraq since military action began

A British soldier has been killed by a roadside bomb in Basra, the Ministry of Defence has confirmed.

The soldier was on a routine patrol in the southern Iraqi city and died as a result of his injuries at about 2323 local time on Tuesday (2123 BST).

He will not be named until his next of kin have been informed of his death, the MoD said.

The death brings the number of British troops killed in Iraq to 97 - 64 of them as a result of hostile activity.

Major Steven Melbourne, based in Basra, said: "A British soldier died from the injuries sustained from a roadside blast at 11.23 local time last night. "The incident is under investigation."

The explosion happened on the eve of the start of former leader Saddam Hussein's trial.

In another attack, a US soldier was killed by a roadside bomb while on patrol near Iskandariyah, 50km (30 miles) south of Baghdad.

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UK soldier killed in Basra named

Chris Hickey was described as the "epitome of a professional soldier"

A British soldier killed by a roadside bomb in Basra on Tuesday has been named by the Ministry of Defence.

Sergeant Christian Ian Hickey, 30, of the 1st Battalion The Coldstream Guards, died from his injuries.

The married soldier from Bradford, West Yorkshire, was on a routine patrol in the southern Iraqi city when the attack happened.

His death brings the number of British troops killed in Iraq to 97 - 64 of them as a result of hostile activity.

The Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards Battle Group, Lieutenant Colonel Nick Henderson, said Sgt Hickey had moved forward on foot to reconnoitre a route for the patrol when he was hit by the blast.

He said it was typical of Sgt Hickey that he had been leading from the front when he was killed, and praised him as the "epitome of a professional soldier".

UK Prime Minister Tony Blair sent his condolences to the soldier's family during Commons questions on Wednesday.

Major Steven Melbourne, based in Basra, said: "A British soldier died from the injuries sustained from a roadside blast at 11.23pm local time last night. The incident is under investigation."

The explosion happened on the eve of the start of former leader Saddam Hussein's trial.

In another attack, a US soldier was killed by a roadside bomb while on patrol near Iskandariyah, 50km (30 miles) south of Baghdad.

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DoD Identifies Army Casualty

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Spc. Christopher T. Monroe, 19, of Kendallville, Ind., died on Oct. 25, in Basra, Iraq, when his 5-ton truck was involved in an automobile accident with a civilian vehicle. Monroe was assigned to the Army Reserve's 785th Military Police Battalion, Fraser, Mich.

For further information related to this release, contact Army Public Affairs at (703) 692-2000.

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Tributes to Iraq blast sergeant

John "Jonah" Jones served in Bosnia, Northern Ireland and Kosovo

The widow of a British soldier killed by a roadside bomb in Iraq on Sunday has paid tribute to a loving husband and "fantastic dad".

Sergeant John Jones, 31, died and four others were injured, one seriously, in the attack in Basra. They are being treated at the Shaiba field hospital.

Sgt "Jonah" Jones, a Birmingham father of one, served with the 1st Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

His wife Nickie said family members were mourning their "terrible loss".

The death of Sgt Jones, from Castle Bromwich, brings to 98 the number of British military fatalities since the invasion in March 2003.

He loved being a soldier and was very proud of his regiment

Nickie Jones

Mrs Jones described her husband as an "all round sportsman" who boxed, played football and was "passionate about Aston Villa".

"He loved being a soldier and was very proud of his regiment," she said.

Sgt Jones was "a fantastic dad" to their five-year-old son Jack, she added.

'Much loved'

Sgt Jones' commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Simon Marr, said he would be remembered as an "outstanding" soldier.

"Jonah Jones was a much loved and highly popular member of our Battalion, the First Fusiliers," he said.

Brimming with energy, a love of soldiering and an endearing sense of humour and compassion for his men, he will be sorely missed

Sgt Jones' commanding officer Lieutenant Colonel Simon Marr

Lt Col Marr described Sgt Jones as "brimming with energy, a love of soldiering and an endearing sense of humour and compassion for his men" and a man who would be "sorely missed".

Defence Secretary John Reid has also paid tribute to Sgt Jones.

"I was very saddened to hear that a British soldier had died whilst performing his duty in Iraq," he said.

"As always, my thoughts and prayers are with his family, and those of his fellow soldiers injured in this barbaric act of terrorism."

Sgt Jones joined the Army at 16 and had served in Bosnia, Northern Ireland and Kosovo.

New devices

Sunday's attack happened while the soldiers were on a routine patrol at about 1230 local time in the north of Basra.

British forces in Iraq spokesman Major Steve Melbourne said the attack had been carried out by terrorists and not local insurgents.

"These are very small groups that operate in the area," he added.

"They cause serious risk to both ourselves and the local population in Basra."

The BBC's Paul Wood said the device used in the attack was likely to be one of a new type of hi-tech explosive device which has been killing British soldiers since August.

They have sophisticated triggers and are capable of piercing through armour, which mean patrols in southern Iraq are "far more risky" for British soldiers.

The UK government claims the technology used in the attacks is coming over the Iranian border, a charge which Tehran strongly denies.

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I don't know if anyone can help, but I'm trying to find details of the death of a Royal Marine Military Policeman in November this year. I have only just found out about it, and have so far been unable to speak to his family/friends so details are a little sketchy. I believe it happened at the end of November, in Iraq. The only news I have been able to find from this time is regarding Sgt John Jones, as in the last post. However, news reports I have read do mention others were injured in this attack, one seriously... maybe this was him. His name was William Jones. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanking you all in advance.

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I don't know if anyone can help, but I'm trying to find details of the death of a Royal Marine Military Policeman in November this year. I have only just found out about it, and have so far been unable to speak to his family/friends so details are a little sketchy. I believe it happened at the end of November, in Iraq. The only news I have been able to find from this time is regarding Sgt John Jones, as in the last post. However, news reports I have read do mention others were injured in this attack, one seriously... maybe this was him. His name was William Jones. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanking you all in advance.

Not heard anything about this serviceman sorry, are you sure he was in Iraq? If you find anything out about him, please post it on the forum!!!

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Roll of Honour for Afganistan

10/29/05 Sherwood, Steven Lance Corporal 23 UK UK Army 1st Battalion, The Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Light Infantry Hostile - hostile fire Mazar-e Sharif Ross-on-Wye Herefordshire

01/28/04 Kitulagoda, Jonathan Private 23 UK E (Devon & Dorset) Company, The Rifle Volunteers, British Territorial Army Hostile - hostile fire - suicide bomber Kabul (near) Plymouth

08/17/02 Busuttil, Robert Sergeant 30 UK Royal Logistics Corps Non-hostile - homicide Kabul Tycoch Swansea

08/17/02 Gregory, John Corporal 30 UK Royal Logistics Corps Non-hostile - suicide British base at Kabul International Airport Catterick North Yorkshire

04/09/02 George, Darren John Lance Corporal 22 UK 1st Battalion, Royal Anglian Regiment

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A soldier from the 7th Armoured Brigade, serving with the 1st Battalion The Highlanders, was killed by small arms fire while on patrol in Maysan province, southern Iraq, on 30 January. No other UK personnel were injured in the incident.

The death of a soldier from 7th Armoured Brigade as the result of an explosion in southern Iraq on 31 January has brought the number of UK troops killed during operations in the country to 100.

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A little of topic, but I feel that he should be remember.

Two released over soldier death

Narel Sharpe had only just got back to England when he was shot

Two youths arrested on suspicion of murder, after a soldier was shot while on leave celebrating his 21st birthday, have been released without charge.

Trooper Narel Sharpe was shot once in the abdomen in Smethwick, West Midlands, on Saturday - hours after returning from a base in Germany.

Two 15-year-old local youths were detained on Sunday night and released on Monday.

Mr Sharpe, 20, was honoured with medals for his service in Iraq and Kosovo.

Birthday party

The tank regiment soldier, of the Queen's Royal Hussars, died in hospital after being found with stomach wounds at 0430 BST on Saturday.

He had earlier been seen struggling with a man on the ground outside shops in Oldbury Road before he was shot near the junction with Spon Lane.

Mr Sharpe would have turned 21 on Friday and his mother, Gayle Sharpe, 39, told a news conference that she had been organising a joint 21st and 40th birthday party for herself and her son.

Ms Sharpe said: "He went to Iraq and Kosovo, the most dangerous places and he came through all that.

Gayle Sharpe said her son had a smile for everyone

"If he had died in the line of duty, I would have been able to deal with it much better.

"At the party, I was going to stand with both of my sons as the proudest mum. We have been through rough times mentally, physically and emotionally.

"Narel had never been in trouble or in any arguments with anyone. Everyone only ever saw him smile and loved him."

Ms Sharpe said her son was travelling home a different route than normal and believes he stopped to speak to someone he knew around the time of the shooting.

In response to questions about her feelings towards his attacker(s), Ms Sharpe said: "At the moment, I don't feel no hate. I would like to see the person face to face and ask him why."

The soldier, who was based near Dusseldorf, had travelled back on a ferry from Calais to Dover and reached the port at 0045 BST.

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Last Updated: Tuesday, 31 January 2006, 19:48 GMT

Soldier's family speak of anguish

The death of L/Cpl Douglas has devastated his family

The family of a Scottish soldier killed in Iraq have spoken of their anguish and claimed: "It wasn't his war".

L/Cpl Allan Douglas, 22, from Aberdeen, who was serving with The Highlanders, died after coming under fire in the Maysan area on Monday.

His mother Diane said: "It wasn't his war. But as he said, he's in the army, that's his job."

A Royal Scots Dragoon Guard killed in Basra on Tuesday has been named as Cpl Gordon Alexander Pritchard.

He died from injuries sustained in an explosion while on a rations and water run in Um Qasr.

Cpl Pritchard, who was married with children, was commanding the lead Land Rover as part of a three-vehicle convoy.

I do not think Tony Blair should have put any young kids out there

He was the 100th UK soldier to die in Iraq since the 2003 invasion.

L/Cpl Douglas' family believe the young soldier's body will be returned to Aberdeen later this week for his funeral.

Speaking to BBC Scotland from her home in Aberdeen, Mrs Douglas said: "All I know is that Allan had taken a bullet, was taken to hospital and died of his injuries.

"We are now waiting for an inquiry as to what happened.

"Allan's been in Iraq for a couple of months now, he was home at Christmas for a fortnight.

"He did not want to go back this time - he'd seen enough the first time he was over.

"But as he said, he's in the army, that's his job.

Very proud

"He said it was a waste of time people being there, he just really didn't like it at all.

"I did not want him to go there at all - it wasn't his war. We were not very happy that he had to go there.

"I think it's a damn disgrace, they should not be out there at all.

"I do not think Tony Blair should have put any young kids out there - there's been so many of them killed.

Diane Douglas said she did not want her son to go to Iraq

"He could not wait to get into the army, he thought it would be a great life, make a career out of it. Obviously it did not work out that way for him.

"We will bring him back home to Aberdeen."

She added: "We are of course very proud of him."

Mrs Douglas said the family would remember him as "just the happy-go-lucky lad he was", adding: "He just loved life, he just lived for life."

Lt Col James Hopkinson, his commanding officer, said: "L/Cpl Allan Douglas was extremely well liked by all who knew him - he displayed all the qualities of professionalism, drive and humour that make a Scottish soldier.

Deeply saddened

"He made a true difference in Iraq. It is telling that since this sad incident a great many Iraqis, both civilian leaders and members of the security forces, have called to pass on their condolences. Allan made an impact in their lives that it will be hard to match.

"L/Cpl Douglas was not only a comrade but was a friend to many. He will be sorely missed by those who were privileged to serve with him."

Defence Secretary John Reid said: "My thoughts are with his family and friends."

L/Cpl Douglas was the 99th British soldier to die in Iraq, and the total reached 100 when another British soldier died in a blast in southern Iraq.

The prime minister's spokesman said Mr Blair was "deeply saddened" by the deaths but added British troops would be in Iraq for as long as is necessary.

Our soldiers have shown great courage and bravery

Save the Scottish Regiments

A Save the Scottish Regiments campaign spokesman said: "Like Mrs Douglas the campaign has been bitterly opposed to the over-frequent tours of duty faced by Scottish soldiers, many of who have returned to Iraq without proper rest, both physically and psychologically.

"Despite being taken into what can only be best described as a questionable war, our soldiers have shown great courage and bravery.

"This campaign calls on those responsible in government to be held accountable."

Scottish National Party leader Alex Salmond said: "Our deepest sympathy and condolences go to the two families involved.

"The loss of 100 soldiers and the injury of many hundreds more hangs as a badge of shame on Blair's arm."

Cpl Gordon Alexander Pritchard

L/Cpl Douglas

Edited by bigjarofwasps

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UK soldier dies in Basra accident

A British soldier has been killed in a road accident in Iraq - becoming the third UK forces fatality this week and the 101st since the 2003 invasion.

The soldier, from the 9th/12th Lancers, died after a crash on the outskirts of Basra in southern Iraq at 2317 local time (2017 GMT) on Thursday.

A Ministry of Defence investigation is under way, although officials say "hostile involvement" is not suspected.

Two other servicemen died in enemy attacks earlier this week.

One other man was injured in the traffic accident and was being treated at the Shaibah hospital.

The MoD said he was expected to be released from hospital shortly.

Casualties

On Tuesday Cpl Gordon Alexander Pritchard, 31, a soldier from the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards died in an explosion in Umm Qasr, Basra province.

A day earlier, L/Cpl Allan Douglas, 22, was killed after his patrol came under fire in the Maysan province of southern Iraq.

Of the 101 servicemen and women who have died in Iraq, 77 were classed as being killed in action.

The other 24 died from illness, non-combat injuries, accident or an unknown cause.

In all, 2,242 US troops have died in the conflict.

There is no widely accepted figure for the number of Iraqi civilian deaths although estimates have varied between 10,000 and 100,000.

Edited by bigjarofwasps

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Iraq attack kills two UK soldiers

Footage from Amara

Two British soldiers have been killed and another injured by a roadside bomb in Amara, southern Iraq, the Ministry of Defence has said.

The three were attached to a battlegroup mainly made up of members of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards.

Tony Blair's official spokesman said the prime minister was "sadly aware" of the deaths, which take the number of UK troops killed in Iraq to 103.

Iraqis threw stones as troops arrived at the scene after the blast.

Several blasts

The bombing happened as at least 50 people were killed and many more injured by at least four blasts in Baghdad - just a day after a curfew imposed following earlier violence was lifted.

A suicide attacker blew himself up after joining a queue of people trying to buy kerosene in the New Baghdad district in the east of the city.

The other blasts were thought to include a mortar attack on the National Theatre in Baghdad.

Video footage of the aftermath of the Amara blast showed British soldiers at the scene and locals throwing stones.

British troops were filmed at the scene

It also shows two Army Land Rovers, one of which was badly damaged.

The BBC's Jane Corbin she was filming in Amara when the attack happened and said the atmopshere was difficult to judge.

"I did walk along one of the main streets of Al-Amara and the situation was very hard to read, I must say. Some stones were thrown, a few people acknowledged me, but many were actively hostile."

She said the tensions in the area had ebbed and flowed over recent months.

About 8,900 UK personnel are stationed in Iraq, mainly in the south-east of the country.

"Next of kin are being informed and we cannot give further details until this process is complete and the incident has been thoroughly investigated," said Mr Blair's spokesman.

The last UK soldier to die in Iraq before Tuesday was Trooper Carl Joseph Smith, 23, from the 9th/12th Lancers, who died after a crash on the outskirts of Basra on 2 February.

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Trooper Carl Smith, 23, from the 9th/12th Lancers, died after a crash on the outskirts of Basra in southern Iraq on 2 February. He had only been on duty in Iraq for 11 days.

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Captain Richard Holmes and Private Lee Ellis, both from 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment and attached to the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, were killed by a roadside bomb on the outskirts of Amara, in southern Iraq, on 28 February.

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Tributes paid to British soldiers killed in Iraq

By Simon Freeman and agencies

Private Lee Ellis (MoD)

Tributes were today paid to two British soldiers killed when a roadside bomb destroyed their armoured Land Rovers in southern Iraq.

Private Lee Ellis, 23, and Captain Richard Holmes, 28, of the Second Battalion The Parachute Regimen were on a routine patrol in the town of Amarah, when an improvised device planted in an abandoned car exploded as they passed.

Private Ellis, of Wythenshawe, Manchester, was described as "bright, enthusiastic and immensely popular". He leaves a fiancee Sarah and a daughter Courtney.

Captain Holmes, of Winchester, Hampshire, leaves a wife Kate, who he married shortly before leaving for Iraq in October 2005.

A third soldier was wounded and had to be rescued by reinforcements who came under attack from a mob of around 30 locals hurling bricks. He was taken by helicopter to the Shaibah field hospital where his injuries were described as non-life threatening.

The deaths of the two men bring the total number of British personnel killed in Operation Telic, the British military campaign in Iraq, to 103.

Private Ellis, was described by his commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel James Chiswell, as “an outstanding soldier”. He had been in Iraq since October 2005 with D Company and operated in Maysaan Province as part of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards Battle Group.

He joined the Army in September 2003 and had served with the regiment since April 2004 after completing his basic training at the Infantry Training Centre in Catterick, North Yorkshire.

Lieutenant Colonel Chiswell said: “Bright, enthusiastic and immensely popular, Private Ellis displayed all the qualities of a first class Paratrooper. His strength of character and dedication were reflected in his determination to overcome injury and to join his friends and comrades on operations in southern Iraq.

“He was a natural team player who always looked out for others and who was always upbeat and focused. Above all else he was a total professional, dedicated to his task. He made a genuine difference in Iraq.”

A Ministry of Defence spokesman said that Private Ellis had been a keen sportsman and had given up an apprenticeship with Wigan Athletic Football Club to join the Army. He was also a boxer and had been due to represent his company and battalion on its return to Colchester.

The spokesman said: “Private Lee Ellis was not only a comrade but a close friend to many. He will be sorely missed by all those who were privileged to serve with and know him. Our thoughts are with his family and young daughter.”

In a poignant final entry on the Friends Reunited website, Private Ellis said that he hoped to make it back from Iraq “in one piece”. The message, posted on the site on January 24, says: “Over in Iraq now and it’s very hot not much to say at the mo.”

Relations between the Army and regional leaders in al-Amarah were strained by the release of film taken in 2004 showing members of the First Battalion of The Light Infantry beating local youths.

Soldiers have since been targeted by an increasingly sophisticated terrorist campaign using high-tech bombs triggered by infra-red tripwires. Amarah lies on the River Tigris, close to the Iranian border.

Video film taken afterwards showed locals hurling rocks at troops arriving on the scene. A blazing vehicle, thought to be that carrying the bomb, and two Land Rovers, one of which was badly damaged, were also visible.

Private Lee Ellis

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The death of a British soldier in a roadside bomb attack near Ad Dayr in southern Iraq on 15 April, has brought the number of UK troops killed during operations in the country to 104.

Lieutenant Richard Palmer, of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, died after the vehicle he was commanding was caught in a roadside explosion near Ad Dayr, north-west of Basra, on 15 April.

Lt Palmer, 27, from Ware, Hertfordshire, was "widely regarded by soldier and officer alike as a star of the future," said his commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Ben Edwards.

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Basra crash victims named by MoD

Flt Lt Sarah-Jayne Mulvihill was a Flight Operations Officer

The first British servicewoman to die in action in Iraq was among five military personnel killed in Saturday's helicopter crash in Basra.

Flt Lt Sarah-Jayne Mulvihill, 32, died with Wing Commander John Coxen, Lt Commander Darren Chapman, Captain David Dobson, and Marine Paul Collins.

Wing Commander Coxen, from RAF Benson in Oxfordshire, is the most senior British officer to be killed in Iraq.

Specialists have arrived from the UK to investigate the crash.

'Totally professional'

The investigators, from the Joint Helicopter Command air accident investigation unit, are examining the helicopter's wreckage to find out if reports suggesting that it was downed are accurate.

It is unclear why the helicopter went down on Saturday, but if enemy fire is found to be the cause of the crash it would be the first time a British military helicopter had been shot down in southern Iraq.

Senior commanders say that nothing had been ruled out, but it could have been brought down by small arms fire, rocket-propelled grenade or an anti-aircraft missile.

Flt Lt Mulvihill, also of Royal Air Force Benson, served as a Flight Operations Officer.

Sarah was one of the Royal Air Force's finest: courageous, upbeat and unselfish

Group Captain Duncan Welham

Tributes paid after Iraq crash

Marine epitomised elite force

Lt Cdr Chapman, of the Royal Navy, was the commanding officer of 847 Naval Air Squadron based at Yeovilton, Somerset.

The 40-year-old was married with three children.

Capt David Dobson, 27, of the Army Air Corps, had been serving as a pilot with 847 Naval Air Squadron, based at Royal Naval Air Station Yeovilton.

And 21-year-old Marine Paul Collins, from Dawlish, Devon, served as an Air Door Gunner with 847 Naval Air Squadron.

He was also based at Yeovilton.

Tributes have been paid to the five who died.

Group Captain Duncan Welham, Station Commander Royal Air Force Benson, spoke highly of Flt Lt Mulvihill.

Tributes have been paid to the crash victims

"Sarah was one of the Royal Air Force's finest: courageous, upbeat and unselfish," he said.

"She was a dedicated officer who will be missed by us all."

And Colonel John McCardle, of the Royal Marines, said Paul Collins was "the epitome of what the Royal Marines represent".

"A fit, intelligent young man, he was totally professional in everything he did and enjoyed life to the full."

Prime Minister Tony Blair, speaking at his monthly news conference, offered his sympathies to the families of those on board and paid tribute to the "heroism, commitment and professionalism of our armed forces".

Iraqi co-operation

Newly-appointed Defence Secretary Des Browne made a statement about the helicopter crash to the House of Commons in which he confirmed that an investigation in the crash was underway.

Mr Browne also touched on the government's plans for an exit strategy.

"We are still committed to remaining in Iraq as long as we are needed and the Iraqi government wants us to stay, and until the job is done," he said.

Wing Commander John Coxen is the most senior officer killed in Iraq

Its official line remains that the five are missing, presumed dead.

Meanwhile, Iraqi authorities in Basra have agreed to formally resume co-operation with the British Army after relations had soured following a series of flare-ups.

The governor of Basra, Mohammed al-Waeli, announced on Sunday that security co-operation with the British would resume after it had been suspended for several weeks.

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Private Joseva Lewaicei, 25, and Private Adam Morris, 19, from the 2nd Battalion Royal Anglian Regiment, were killed in a roadside bomb explosion just outside the southern city of Basra on 13 May.

Private Lewaicei, a father of one who was born and grew up in Fiji, was described as a "universally popular" character. Private Morris, who was single and lived with his mother in Leicester, was said to have had a "fine career ahead of him".

Private Joseva Lewaicei and Private Adam Morris killed in Iraq

15 May 06

It is with deepest regret that the Ministry of Defence must confirm the deaths of Private Joseva Lewaicei, 25, and Private Adam Morris, 19, both of The 2nd Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment.

Both men died as a result of injuries sustained from a roadside bomb at approximately 2345hrs local time in Basra City, Southern Iraq, on 13 May 2006. The two riflemen were on a routine patrol when the incident occurred.

Private Joseva 'Lewi' Lewaicei (pronounced 'Lewethi'), was born on 29 April 1981 in Lautoka, Fiji. Lewi grew up in Fiji but decided early on, like many of his friends, to join the British Army.

He joined The 2nd Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment, known as 'The Poachers', in May 2002 at the age of 21. Since then he served as a rifleman in Afghanistan between June and October 2003 as part of the enduring ISAF commitment and for two years in Ballykelly, Northern Ireland on a roulement tour. He also served in Jordan and Iraq, particularly enjoying the amount of time he spent in helicopters on both occasions.

Members of his platoon will remember him fondly as a reliable and professional soldier as well as being someone who could make them laugh. He was the first Fijian to join the Battalion, and was planning to take some of his friends to the South Pacific to show them his home, Paradise Island. He was proud of his job in the Army and his efficient style was an example to others.

He was good company; his colleagues describing him as the soul of the platoon. He was also protective of them all and somebody others would turn to for help. One dyslexic soldier described how Lewi would assist him with his written English by checking the spelling in letters to his girlfriend.

He was the father of a 7-year old daughter in Fiji. Universally popular he will be sorely missed by his friends and colleagues.

His Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Des O’Driscoll, said:

"Private Lewaicei was a valued and well-regarded member of C Company and was known as a fun loving and exuberant character. He was a keen sportsman and had represented the Battalion in both Rugby and Boxing. He was an exceptional rugby full back regularly impressing those who saw him play, and was once offered a professional contract.

"Immensely strong, his colleagues will remember with some glee the day he was finally beaten in an arm wrestle by their platoon sergeant, although he always maintained he let him win.

"Our sympathy goes out to his family at this terrible time; we are deeply saddened at his tragic loss; he will be sorely missed by his friends and the wider regimental family."

Private Adam Peter Morris, nicknamed 'Borris', was born on 24 September 1986. He lived in Leicester with his mother Linder and attended the local college before joining the British Army at the age of 17. He was single.

Private Morris completed his basic training at the Infantry Training Centre Catterick in 2004. He then joined C Company 2 Royal Anglian in Northern Ireland, serving as a rifleman during a two year roulement tour in Ballykelly.

Despite being a junior soldier he had already been identified as having great potential. His colleagues anticipated that he would make Platoon sergeant at the very least. He was noted for his sheer professionalism and reliability, and on a recent tactics and leadership course he passed out as best student. Whilst exercising in Jordan he took over the role of a non-commissioned officer where he rose to the challenge and acquitted himself with composure.

He was a sociable individual with a good sense of humour. He made time for others and would raise morale by telling jokes and playing the fool, belying his true intelligence and passion for the military. He was happy to be in Iraq and getting on with his job.

During a period of ceremonial duty at the funeral for HRH Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester in November 2004 he was particularly pleased when members of the Royal family spoke to him personally, complementing him on his turnout and appearance.

He will be remembered as a friend and a most accomplished soldier. His loss has touched and greatly saddened all those who had the honour to know him.

His Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Des O’Driscoll, said:

"Adam joined the battalion in Northern Ireland and rapidly made his mark as an energetic and thoroughly professional young soldier. He undoubtedly had a bright future ahead of him. Although Private Morris had only been with 'The Poachers' for just under two years, he was one of our most promising young soldiers and had a fine career ahead of him.

"Always one of the keenest and most attentive soldiers in the Company he stood out from many of his peers. At times teased for his military knowledge, he had an inquiring mind and a desire to learn.

"He was well-liked and respected by all the company for his resolve. He had suffered a leg injury late in 2005 but fought his way back to fitness, determined that he must deploy on operations in Iraq alongside his many friends. Always 'Army barmy' he even found a camouflage cover for the cast on his leg.

"Adam’s loss has touched and saddened all of us who had the honour to know him. Our thoughts are with his family at this terrible time; He will be sorely missed by his friends and by the wider regiment."

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MoD names troops killed in Iraq

Lt Tom Mildinhall (left) and L/Cpl Paul Farrelly died on Sunday

Two UK soldiers who were killed in a bombing in Iraq on Sunday have been named by the Ministry of Defence.

L/Cpl Paul Farrelly, 27, from Runcorn in Cheshire, and Lt Tom Mildinhall, 26, from the Queen's Dragoon Guards (Welsh Cavalry), died on patrol in Basra.

The parents of Lt Mildinhall, from Battersea, south London, have paid tribute to their "beautiful, talented and loving son".

Two British TV journalists were killed by a car bomb in Baghdad on Monday.

Soundman James Brolan, 42, and camera operator Paul Douglas, 48, died while filming in Baghdad for US news network CBS. A colleague was left critically ill.

Lt Mildinhall's parents added: "Our world is in pieces and our country has again lost one of its best."

'Capable officer'

The two soldiers were killed in an attack in Gizayza, north-west Basra, when they were on routine patrol in an armoured Land Rover, in support of operations to disrupt the insurgency.

Lt Mildinhall was described by his commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Pittman, as "a thoroughly capable officer".

"He led by example and his soldiers responded positively, safe in the knowledge he had their best interests at heart," he said.

"It was typical of his command style to insist he physically led the more dangerous patrols, as he was doing last night when his troop came under attack and he suffered a fatal injury."

The MoD said he would "be missed by those who served alongside him "for his extremely dry sense of humour and razor sharp wit".

After completing his officer training at Sandhurst in April 2004 his first deployment in Iraq was helping train Iraqi border police.

He undertook this difficult task with "considerable enthusiasm and diligence", quickly making a "considerable impact", said the MoD.

His second deployment to Iraq began a month ago.

He (L/Cpl Farrelly) embodied much of what is best about soldiers in the British Army

Lt Col Pittman

Commanding officer

Family's tribute to son

Crew 'were war veterans'

Lt Mildinhall, who studied at Durham University, was also a keen downhill ski instructor.

Family man

L/Cpl Farrelly, known as "Fas", grew up in Runcorn, but moved to Rhyl, north Wales, when he was around 16.

The married father-of-three was a "committed family man" who spoke "often and fondly" of his wife Natalie and their three children, said the MoD.

His commanding officer Lt Col Pittman said he stood out as a "natural leader".

"He embodied much of what is best about soldiers in the British Army; selfless, determined, humorous and steadfast in the face of adversity," he said.

L/Cpl Farrelly joined the Army in March 2002 and was judged top recruit during his basic training in Winchester. He was on his third deployment in Iraq, which began a month ago.

Welsh Secretary Peter Hain paid tribute to the two men.

"The deaths of these two young soldiers serving in the Welsh Cavalry is a tragedy and a reminder to us all of the courage and dedication of our troops engaged in Iraq in very difficult circumstances," he said.

"I extend my deepest sympathy to their families, friends and colleagues."

The two soldiers bring the toll of British forces personnel to be killed in the Iraq war to 113. Nine have been killed this month, including five who died in a helicopter crash.

Defence Secretary Des Browne told the BBC the upsurge in violence in Iraq was a cause of "major concern".

He called on Iraqis to "get a grip" on security and on those behind the violence through local and central governance.

"We have promised to and we will continue to remain in Iraq until the Iraqi government is confident that the Iraqi security forces are capable of providing security without assistance from the coalition forces," he said.

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