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Hello Everyone

I have had this medal for some time now and do not see many come on the market. I know they are quite scarce. The medal is The Slopers Medal For Valour. The Reverse is engraved as follows and was presented to:

William Hall

Clerkenwell

December 28th

1898

It comes complete with ribbon and top suspender bar with pin.

I would be grateful if anyone on the forum can help with a citation as to why Hall received this medal. I understand it is for courageous conduct.

Regards

Anthony Govender

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Not your guy... but this shows where the citations were... "Aly Slopers half hour"

Medals ] `Slopers' Medal of Valour (Presented to John Jones for his courageous conduct at Aberaman Colliery, "The Sloperies", Decr. 7 1889), 36mm., silver, complete with silver brooch bar, in case of issue, extremely fine, rare E250-300 Ex Spink 12 April 1990, lot 123. The "Sloper's Silver Medal for Valour" awarded to John Jones, for his courageous actions in rescuing a fellow workman at Aberaman Colliery. `It appears that a man named Charles Swift, collier, employed at the Powell Duffryn Colliery Company's Aberaman Colliery, was working in a piece of `waste', when an accumulation of gas overpowered him, and he sank insensible to the ground. Some fellow workmen hard by at once rushed to his assistance, but had to retire almost in a state of suffocation. Three attempts were made, and afterwards the foreman was sent for, who, accompanied by John Jones, rapidly covered the quarter mile to the spot. All the hopes of the bystanders was gone when Jones went in, and rendered breathless by the foul gas, endeavoured to pull the body out. But alas! He failed! Joining hands with the others, he again endeavoured, but his efforts were fruitless. The gallant fellow then called for a double set of linked hands, but was unable to get them. A leading chain was procured, and John fastened the end to the insensible man's waist, and attempts were made to pull the body out by that means, but unfortunately the chain broke. Another was procured, and again John heroically, at the risk of his own life, fastened the chain around the comatose man, who was at last pulled out from his perilous position. When he remained insensible for two hours, his first act on coming to himself being to pounce upon Jones and bite him upon his left arm, inflicting a flesh wound. Of course this was due to muscular reaction. Had it not been for Jones who was the only one who had sufficient temerity to handle the insensible body Swift would have died in his comatose state. The gallant rescuer lives at 273 Cardiff Road, Aberaman. (Extract from the magazine Ally Sloper's Half Hour, 7 December 1889)

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lly Sloper's Half-Holiday was the name of a weekly comic strip which first appeared on 3 May 1884. Every age has its famous comic and cartoon characters. Present generations, growing up with Alf Garnet and Andy Capp may not yet have heard of Ally Sloper, however, from 1884 until the 1920s, the red-nosed social climber who poked fun at the English people and their customs was a household name and national favourite.

Ally Sloper takes us into the realms of the first comic strip character - forget the Beano and Dandy. This comic strip started it all. Here is a man who became an institution, a national hero. People actually believed that he existed, they even wrote to him and joined his club. There were medals presented in his name.

He represented the hopes and aspirations of a whole new class of people, brought about by the industrial revolution. The aristocracy was under threat with the present class dilemmas. The Victorian Alf Garnet takes us right back to basics. With the current public debate on the

House of Lords and the Royal Family's role in today's society,

this show takes us to the heart of the discussion.

Chris Harris now recreates Ally in a performance with scenes set in Ascot, Lords and on the battlefields of the Empire. A hilarious glimpse of the past where Harris proves himself a modern master of stand-up comedy, beguiling his audience with his infectious good humour and charm. A family show suitable for children aged 11 and over. The show is co-written and directed by Chris Denys.

This show works well where a community has something special to celebrate. The hall can be decked out and the audience can be encouraged to dress up in the style of a Victorian Music Hall.

"A determined assault on the funnybone...an unrelenting string of gags...Harris has become a master."

The Guardian

"One man laugh machine"

South China Post

"Harris reduces his audience to helpless jellies of mirth."

The Stage

"If you are not amused by this then your sense of humour needs a transplant."

Alan King, Bath Theatre Royal

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A Soldier of the Queen: Being a Slight Tribute to Gunner William Hall, Royal Artillery, for His Conspicuous Gallantry, While on Furlough in Saving the Lives of 6 Persons from Certain Death in Clerkenwell on Wednesday, December 28th, 1898

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All part of the great Victorian social experiment, which included the Salvation Army, originally meant to promote temperance in the working classes, Andrew Carnegie's free public libraries, Societies for the prevention of cruelty to children and animals, usually in that order, and prisons set up to educate and 'reform' convists, as an alternative to execution or transportation.

[Aside: given the wide success of so many other Victorian notions - prohibition, 'educating the masses', the 60 hour work week child prostitution and the worst excesses of the Empire - why would anyone still subscribe to their ideas on criminal justice? :( Rant over!]

There were a number of organizations and individuals - humane societies, the lifeboat institution and so on - devoted to rewarding and publicizing public service and bravery or devotion to duty of 'the ordinary man'. The official font of honours even got into the act with the George Cross, the 'civilian Victoria Cross'.

Your medal represents one such notion. And, BTW, I am not sneering at any of those groups or persons. Well, maybe the prison reformers and their modern disciples. Some of the benefits, other than the recognition of individuals for various benificial acts, was the development of an educated, interested middle class, to which most of us here aspire to belong! ;)

Peter

Edited by peter monahan

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http://www.imageandnarrative.be/inarchive/graphicnovel/rogersabin.htm

Some background on Ally Sloper.

Bill

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Hello Everyone

 

I have had this medal for some time now and do not see many come on the market. I know they are quite scarce. The medal is The Slopers Medal For Valour. The Reverse is engraved as follows and was presented to:

 

William Hall

Clerkenwell

December 28th

1898

 

It comes complete with ribbon and top suspender bar with pin.

 

I would be grateful if anyone on the forum can help with a citation as to why Hall received this medal. I understand it is for courageous conduct.

 

 

Regards

Anthony Govender

IMG00479-20120923-1320.jpg

IMG00480-20120923-1321.jpg

IMG00481-20120923-1321.jpg

This is a wonderful piece  We have been searching for a nice example of the Sloper medal for quite some time.  I realize that is is a very old post, but regardless....thank you for sharing these photos.  Please let me know if this or any other examples of this medal are ever available.  Kind regards, WIlliam Martin Sloper Leach, Ally Sloper Archive,  ComicArt4u@comcast.net

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What a lovely thing!  Thank you for sharing the phgotos of this elusive beast. 

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