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WWI US Enlisted Aviation Tunic


jaba1914
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From what I can see - the unifomr is original. Missing the collar discs. The aviation patch looks original to the tunic as it looks 'imbedded' into the wool of the sleeve. The Aviation patch (or any other patch in that location) was denoted to indicate the rank of "Private". The chevron in the middle of the left sleeve is the "discharge" stripe: meaning he could wear the uniform for some time after being discharged from the armed forces (this way the Military Police would be less likely to pick you up for appearing to be AWOL) the silver stripe below that indicates 6 months of overseas duty. What is nice to see is that it is sans a 'unit pacth' or SSI on the left sleeve as well. This was a common practice AFTER the war (though some divisions created theirs during the war hence setting the precidence). The unifomr was worn on the troop ship home, had a drink at the local pub and then hung it with care in the closet for nearly 80 years.... :jumping:

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From what I can see - the unifomr is original. Missing the collar discs. The aviation patch looks original to the tunic as it looks 'imbedded' into the wool of the sleeve. The Aviation patch (or any other patch in that location) was denoted to indicate the rank of "Private". The chevron in the middle of the left sleeve is the "discharge" stripe: meaning he could wear the uniform for some time after being discharged from the armed forces (this way the Military Police would be less likely to pick you up for appearing to be AWOL) the silver stripe below that indicates 6 months of overseas duty. What is nice to see is that it is sans a 'unit pacth' or SSI on the left sleeve as well. This was a common practice AFTER the war (though some divisions created theirs during the war hence setting the precidence). The unifomr was worn on the troop ship home, had a drink at the local pub and then hung it with care in the closet for nearly 80 years.... :jumping:

Thnak you hunyadi for your oppinion. How does the collar discs look like. I want complete this one.

Regards

Alex

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Alex - these are representative at best - the one on the far right is a Signals disk - as the aviation units were intended for observation for artillery, many aviation units used these. There is aslo a rare winged propeller disk that could be used. The "unit disk" was generaly worn on the left side of the wearer while a state, national or designation (reserve, millitia, etc...) was used on the right.

http://cgi.ebay.com/NICE-LOT-OF-THREE-WWI-...1QQcmdZViewItem

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Alex - a corporal and sergeant would wear the typical chevrons where the patch is on this one. Then the designation for an aviation unit would be identified by the collar disks - which of course are removable....so what you have there is 99% certainly an original aviation unit uniform.

I am sure that somewhere there is a comprehensive listing of the patches and such. Men at Arms did a pretty good book about WW1 uniforms - but I dont have it here anymore so I cant give much more than that.

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Thank you vary much hunyadi. You are a great help. I learned a lot about US Uniform.

What about this one. It should be an officer wool gaberdine tunic.

It`s this tunic an original WW1 or are any doubts? What model it is?

Avers

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Side

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inside

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euXCdOcPPZcO.JPG

Collar

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Kvajb0ZyHnwx.JPG

Label

K1jIIEtZ1nq5.JPG

Thank Alex

Edited by jaba1914
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Hi Alex - without my references with me its hard to recall the different styles - I believe that this is a 1917 model (?). Probably a parade style tuinc. Certainly looks very period and typical. The shoulder patch was added post war when the practice became more popular for reunions, veterans day parades and such... The patch is for the 91st Infantry Division. Here is a nice site on the history

http://members.aol.com/ItalyWW2/Division91.htm

Once again the tunic shown here is missing the collar devices - these were cut out style pins (crossed rifles, artillery, etc...) with a unit number added. They were rather large and looked like they would snag on just about anything.

Bullion captains bars and the overseas stripes (3 = 1 1/2 years overseas service) are very period and desireable. Are these your items? Nice collection you have started there! :jumping:

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Hi Alex - without my references with me its hard to recall the different styles - I believe that this is a 1917 model (?). Probably a parade style tuinc. Certainly looks very period and typical. The shoulder patch was added post war when the practice became more popular for reunions, veterans day parades and such... The patch is for the 91st Infantry Division. Here is a nice site on the history

<a href="http://members.aol.com/ItalyWW2/Division91.htm" target="_blank">http://members.aol.com/ItalyWW2/Division91.htm</a>

Once again the tunic shown here is missing the collar devices - these were cut out style pins (crossed rifles, artillery, etc...) with a unit number added. They were rather large and looked like they would snag on just about anything.

Bullion captains bars and the overseas stripes (3 = 1 1/2 years overseas service) are very period and desireable. Are these your items? Nice collection you have started there! :jumping:

Thank again. this is not my main collection, but i like the US uniforms of WW1 especially aviation. Because i collect imperial german aviation.

Regards

Alex

Edited by jaba1914
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