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Medal Identification


Kevin5806
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I have a picture of my great grandfather's service medals that I am trying to identify.  The picture isn't the greatest but it's the only one I could get.  Any help and additional info be greatly appreciated.

13068.jpeg

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Hi Kevin,

top row:

  • Large Silver Medal for Bravery (Austro-Hungary)
  • Small Silver Medal for Bravery (Austro-Hungary)
  • Bronze "Signim Laudis" Medal (Kingdom of Hungary)
  • Charles Troops Cross - for front service (Austro-Hungary)
  • WWI Commemorative Medal f. Combatants (Kingdom of Hungary)

middle row:

  • Wound Medal w. ribbon f. 2 wounds (Austro-Hungary) and badge for war disabled on it (Kingdom of Hungary)
  • National Defense Cross (Kingdom of Hungary)

bottom row:

  • WWI Commemorative Medal f. Combatants (Austrian Republic)
  • WWI Commemorative Medal (Kingdom of Bulgaria)
  • Return of Transylvania Commemorative Medal (Kingdom of Hungary)
  • Return of Upper Hungary Commemorative Medal (Kingdom of Hungary)

below shield:

  • Decoration of Hero (Vitez) (Kingdom of Hungary) - I believe it should be placed higher, as it was a highly respected Hungarian military award.

Unfortunately the photo is too small to see your great grandfather's rank. A-H bravery medals were awarded to non-commissioned ranks, but the "Signum Laudis" suggests he was subsequently promoted to officer in the Kingdom of Hungary.

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Thank you so much for your help I really appreciate it.  I will share this with the rest of my family, this will help me learn more about him.  I was very young when he passed and only remember a few times that he and my great grandma were at family functions.  They only spoke hungarian and I was to young to understand why they talked different. Haha.

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The Bronze "Signim Laudis" Medal in on emerald green ribbon - he awarded for civilian merits, not as soldier.

On the photo he wears an officer uniform of the interwar period - most likely he was an officer candidate in the WWI (they recieved medals for non-commissioned ranks ) and later promoted to reserve junior officer.

If you tell me his name I can search him in the database of the Vitéz Order. The Vitéz Order was an organization for decorated WWI Veterans.

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8 hours ago, Markgraf said:

The Bronze "Signim Laudis" Medal in on emerald green ribbon - he awarded for civilian merits, not as soldier.

On the photo he wears an officer uniform of the interwar period - most likely he was an officer candidate in the WWI (they recieved medals for non-commissioned ranks ) and later promoted to reserve junior officer.

If you tell me his name I can search him in the database of the Vitéz Order. The Vitéz Order was an organization for decorated WWI Veterans.

Thank you so much for your help I really appreciate it.  I will share this with the rest of my family, this will help me learn more about him.  I was very young when he passed and only remember a few times that he and my great grandma were at family functions.  They only spoke hungarian and I was to young to understand why they talked different. Haha.

 

His name was Julius Bendy, I do not have a middle name or know if he one is given.  He grew up in the town of Székesfehérvár. That is all we know anyone in the family that new him have passed.

Thanks

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He didn't have a middle name. His name was Bendy Gyula (Gyula is the Hungarian form of Julius).

According the databases:

Bendy Gyula's highest rank was 1st Lieutenant.

He joined to the army in 1915 to the m. kir. 17 népfelkelő gyalogezred (Royal Hungarian Army 17th népfelkelő Infantry Regiment)

The word "népfelkelő" is hard to translate - this kind of units were formed in case of war.

He fought on the Italian Theather.

On 1916 november 29 he served in the regiments 10th Company. After the company commander killed, the enemy overwhelmed the unit. Bendy Gyula (then officer candidate) saved the companys machine guns. The 1st Class Silver Bravery Medal awarded him for his actions.

Badly wounded in action in 1916 november.

From summer of 1917 he was on the Italian Theather again. Served in the 20th Infantry Division's Assault Battalion - the assault battalions were elite shock troops in the WWI.

Joined to the Vitéz Order in 1924, his registration number was 666 (seriously).

In 1931 the Signum Laudis on emerald ribbon was awarded for him, for the organizing work of the Vitéz Order.

In civilian life he was a school director. He was married with two sons.

The title "vitéz" was inheritable for the first-born sons. His first son called Bendy Kálmán, he joined to the Vitéz Order in 1941.

Kálmán became officer of the Royal Hungarian Air Force. Appointed him to 2nd Lieutenant on 1944 August 20.

Some informations about the Vitéz Order:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_Vitéz

Finally I recommend this society for you:

http://www.newfront.ca/

capture-20160718-083442.png  The portrait of Bendy Gyula in the regimental history.

 

Edited by Markgraf
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I can't thank you enough for taking the time to get this for me, I have shared this with the rest of the family and they are grateful as well.   Bendy Kálmán is still alive and but I don't see him very much, I am not sure how much he knows about his fathers military past.  I have another family member sending this info out and we will make sure he gets this info.  I know most veterans don't like talking about their experiences in battle I am not sure if Julius ever shared any details with his kids.  Thank you again for the help and if you are also a veteran of the military I'd like to thank you for your service as well!

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Thank You! I'm just a simple Reserve Officer  otherwise I'm working in the Museum of Hungarian Military History so this is my job and also my pleasure.

I would like to say "Thank You" for You for preserving the memory of a Hungarian Soldier!

 

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