Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Joy Dean

Royal Marine Artillery Girls School

Recommended Posts

Hopefully this will be partially to do with military things. My grandmother's cousin was at this school in the early 1900s. I have been searching online but cannot find anything about it. It is / was at Eastney, Portsmouth, I think. She is in this photo at the school.

Royal Marine Artillery Girls School.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joy

As I expect you know, Eastney Barracks was the home of the Royal Marine Artillery from 1867 until their amalgamation with the Royal Marine Light Infantry (to form the Royal Marine Corps) in 1927

https://www.geograph.org.uk/snippet/13158

I imagine that this was a girls' school established - and situated in the barracks, perhaps - to educate the daughters of the men living in married quarters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

"Women? In the Royal Marines?"  Puff, pant, red in the face... ;)

Seriously, that is a great piece of history.  I know that the regiments had regimental schools but in my middle-aged male mind it'as always been ' for the boys... until old enough to enlist'.  But of course there were girls too.  I wonder if their curriculum was different and went beyond basic literacy and numeracy? 

Seek and yea shall find.  Apparently, the 3Rs plus religious instruction and 'needlework for the girls and younger boys, according to this exhaustive treatise: THE ARMY SCHOOLMASTER AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION IN THE ARMY, 1812-1920

https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10019106/1/283368.pdf

 

Edited by peter monahan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you. She had been staying with her aunt, uncle and cousin; the uncle was - from the 1901 census - "Gunner, R.M.Artillery, and Tailor's Cutter", and they were living in 11 Kassasin Street, Milton, Portsmouth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, peter monahan said:

Seriously, that is a great piece of history.  I know that the regiments had regimental schools but in my middle-aged male mind it'as always been ' for the boys... until old enough to enlist'.  But of course there were girls too.  I wonder if their curriculum was different and went beyond basic literacy and numeracy? 

Peter

I don't think that this was a Regimental school (for the training of boy soldiers) but, rather, a school for children of the Regiment. Thus it was not set up to educated boy soldiers but to conform with the requirements of the various Education acts as they pertained to the children of Married Quarters (in its broadest sense) were concerned. From 1899, all children were meant to be in school from the ages of five to 12, as per this link

https://www.parliament.uk/about/living-heritage/transformingsociety/livinglearning/school/overview/1870educationact/

Interestingly, after the 1902 Education Act, the education of children became the responsibility of "local education authorities under the control of the county and county borough councils" (see link below), which suggests to me that this photo was taken before that date (the physical training instructor in the photo would have been a civilian, post 1902, I would have thought).

https://www.parliament.uk/about/living-heritage/transformingsociety/livinglearning/school/overview/reform1902-14/

 

Edited by Trooper_D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I don't think that this was a Regimental school (for the training of boy soldiers) but, rather, a school for children of the Regiment. "  Oh, I agree.  As you say, by the late if not mid Victorian era, universal schooling - trained workers for the economy - was very much seen as a 'good thing'.  I haven't looked closely at the various Education Acts, though as a retired teacher I probably should.  The essay I mentioned makes it clear that girls were schooled too and suggests that they were given at least a few 'skills' - needlework, for example - as well as the 'three Rs'.

And I suspect that there were at least a few sons of soldiers who, on reaching enlistment age, said 'Not on a bet!' and opted for civvy street, so they too would have had to have been educated to some acceptable [to local authorities?] standard.

Fascinating topic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...