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Posted (edited)

I need some help with the Walter Schott mark on this Imperial U-Boat badge. I have never seen one with out the die flaw in the Schott (tt). It is a nice badge with very good detail and patina. It has a nice weight and feel to it. I want to know if it is good or a copy.

Thanks

 

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Edited by Wolfstew

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Hello,

Im sorry to say, but the maker mark is wrong. Even under consideration how the flaw developed over time, there are other issues with that mark. 

Yes, it appears to be the real deal from a first glance, but unfortunately it isn’t. 

Best;

Flyingdutchman

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Hi Flyingdutchman,

Thank you for your response. Could you give a bit more information as to why you think the mark is wrong and what the other issues are with that mark and the badge that you do not like. It would be much appreciated.

Thanks again and my best regards,

Michael

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Hello, Flyingdutchman,

Again thank you for your reply to the first post. I appreciate your expertise. Here is another badge that I am looking at. Please if you would give me your opinion on this one and if you think it is good or not. I am looking for a nice original badge and I know there are a lot of bad ones out there. I am well versed in the WWII era German Militaria but not so much in the Imperial era badges. I am just starting to collect this era. I have had trouble finding any good reference books etc. on the subject of Imperial German Militaria. 

My Best Regards,
Michael

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Posted (edited)

Michael,
unfortunately I have to say that this is also a copy, it is even much worse than the first one. 

In an article about these badges I wrote the following:

Quote

An existing awarding document with the corresponding badge proofs an award period until January 1920.
Arithmetically about 4500 badges can have been awarded based on the crew lists. Due to the rarity of original pieces, however, a significantly lower number can be assumed.
Regrettably Schott badges are widely and sometimes professionally counterfeited.

In order to make a direct comparison possible I'm posting here photos of one of my badges. 

 It won't be easy to find an original badge with the green color because, as mentioned above, they are quite rare. 

Nevertheless good luck!

Best;

Hermann

 

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Edited by Flyingdutchman

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Thank you very much Hermann, Is there any good reference books or study material you might suggest? I was curious why the Schott is misspelled? Was it a die flaw. I would really like to study these badges thoroughly before purchasing one if I can find a good reference on them. There are so many different versions out there on the market and I want an original one and I am willing to wait for a good one. Any help and guidance would be appreciated. This is a very nice badge you have!

My Best,

Michael

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Michael,

Ive sent you a pm with a link to my article draft. 
 

Try to find a badge with the green color still present. There are original badges without that color, sometimes misinterpreted by collectors as undesired patina and cleaned away. 
 

Yes, the missing “t” was most likely a die flaw because it changes over time. 
Beside that the appearance of the maker mark is consistent, which helps us today to understand more of these scarce and desirable items. 
Best;

Hermann

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Hello Hermann,

Since I now will studying the Imperial Navy Badges etc. can you help me with these. A friend of mine has been collecting for some time and I am considering these Wound Badges and a U-Boat stick pin. First did they ever make the stick pin for the 1918 U-Boat badge ?( I see a lot of these that are obvious fakes ) but this one looked like it might be ok if they were made in 1918. The Wound Badge Set looks nice but again I am seeing many varieties out there with a lot of obvious fakes. These look like they may be ok. I really appreciate your time and assistance. I hope this is not an inconvenience for you. This really helps me to begin my own research to gain the correct knowledge for this subject of collecting.

My Best,

Michael

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