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Carol I

Austrian WWI ring

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I would think it commemorates the alliance between the AH empire and the German empire during WW1

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I would think it commemorates the alliance between the AH empire and the German empire during WW1

It would certainly seem so from the portraits on the ring. However, the story told for three generations is that the ring was a mark of supporting the Austrian war effort during WWI. More specifically, the lady who wore it was said to have donated her jewelry to the state and in return she received or bought this ring. Does anyone have a similar story?

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I think these sorts of things are not uncommon. Generally described as 'I gave gold for iron' campaigns? l've seen lots of German trinkets with that sort of political slogan or idea. I don't think it was always jewlery, but also included medalions, table medals, etc. I just googled 'gold for iron WWI' to see if anything came up and the following site was returned, which appears to be about an exhibit on the subject at the Croatian History Museum in Zagreb, which of course would make it part of an Austro-Hungarian drive.

http://www.hismus.hr/english/current%20exhibition.htm

I don't really know for sure but I don't remember seeing similar campaigns in France, England, or the US, so maybe it was a Central Powers thing? Anyway, if you google the words I mentioned earlier you will get tons of useful links.

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I would think it commemorates the alliance between the AH empire and the German empire during WW1

The left portrait is H?tzendorf, not Wilhelm. Pure Austrian.

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I think these sorts of things are not uncommon. Generally described as 'I gave gold for iron' campaigns? l've seen lots of German trinkets with that sort of political slogan or idea. I don't think it was always jewlery, but also included medalions, table medals, etc.

Thanks for the confirmation. Their donation was indeed described as "they gave their gold", without the "iron" part but understandable after so many years.

Do you know if the 'gold for iron' campaigns were state organised or local initiatives? And were the trinkets and the jewellery official issues or only local design/manufacture?

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The left portrait is H?tzendorf, not Wilhelm. Pure Austrian.

There are two crowns on the two sides of the effigies. The one to the right appears to be the Imperial Crown of Austria, while the one to the left looks very much like the German State Crown. If the left portrait is not that of Wilhelm II, what is the meaning of the latter crown?

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If the left portrait is not that of Wilhelm II, what is the meaning of the latter crown?

It is difficult to see from the pictures, but if the crown on the right side of the portraits is the Austrian Crown, then from what I can see the crown on the left bears some passing resemblance to the Hungarian Crown (the Crown of St. Stephen). It is difficult to see whether the cross on top of the crown is completely vertical, or slightly tilted, but there is quite a bit of Austro-Hungarian imagery that emphasized the 'two kingdoms' nature of the empire.

Below is the current crest of Hungary with the Crown of St. Stephen on top for comparison.

Edited by KeithB

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I'am shure the ring depicts Franz Josef AND Emperor Wilhelm (btw he has birthday today).

The soldiers in the first picture shown wear PICKELHAUBEN an absolutely clear indicator for imperial german army and

in case of reading of this rings mesage - imperial german participation. so this is a typical alliance-ring (waffenbr?derschaftzs-ring)from 1915

haynau

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It is difficult to see from the pictures, but if the crown on the right side of the portraits is the Austrian Crown, then from what I can see the crown on the left bears some passing resemblance to the Hungarian Crown (the Crown of St. Stephen). It is difficult to see whether the cross on top of the crown is completely vertical, or slightly tilted, but there is quite a bit of Austro-Hungarian imagery that emphasized the 'two kingdoms' nature of the empire.

The cross is completely vertical and the whole shape of the crown appears to be different from that of the Crown of St. Stephen.

crownonringgz6.jpg

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so this is a typical alliance-ring (waffenbr?derschaftzs-ring)from 1915

Can you give some more details about these rings? Would they be worn by a lady? Were they used as marks for the 'I gave gold for iron' campaigns?

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If it is PRUSSIA & AUSTRO-UNGARIA, I am surprised they did not manage to work in the Prussian eagle into the design. :P

But I believe it comes under the heading of Patriotika :beer:

Kevin in Deva :D

Edited by Kev in Deva

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Can you give some more details about these rings? Would they be worn by a lady? Were they used as marks for the 'I gave gold for iron' campaigns?

Normaly the were worn by men, but we can ask Carol I about his rings diameter. IMHOit is socalled patriotika, rings, brooches etc bought to express overhelming patrotic feelings. On the rings for the gold for iron campaigns that i know thre is alway engraved gold gab ich f?r eisen.

Haynau

RINGS

Edited by haynau

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Oh, jeez, goofed again :blush: Didn't notice the German crown or Pickels. I guess it must be Willi.

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Normaly the were worn by men, but we can ask Carol I about his rings diameter. IMHOit is socalled patriotika, rings, brooches etc bought to express overhelming patrotic feelings. On the rings for the gold for iron campaigns that i know thre is alway engraved gold gab ich f?r eisen.

Thanks for the update. I do not have the ring, so I cannot check its inner diametre (I only took the photos), but I guess it has somewhere around 16-17 mm. The only other piece of information I can bring right now is that the lady who owned it was married to an army officer.

One more photo, with the inner markings:

ringis6.jpg

I can only make out GES.GESCH. and JW.

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pict0008dt4.jpg

Can someone give details about the rank (and maybe branch of service) for this officer? Thank you.

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The collar could be one of several colors from the BW photo - I would venture to guess that he is Artillery. His rank is that of Corporal.

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The collar could be one of several colors from the BW photo - I would venture to guess that he is Artillery. His rank is that of Corporal.

Thanks Hunyadi.

On a site on the Austro-Hungarian Army I have found the information below.

Corporal (two six pointed white stars on the collar or collar patch)

korporal.JPG

Lieutenant (two embroidered six pointed silver or gold stars)

oberleutnant.jpg

It is hard to tell from the picture whether the stars are applied or embroidered. Were there any other differences between the insignia of corporals and lieutenants other than the material of the stars? The family references to him are somewhat vague three generations later: "member of the military postal service for many years".

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It is hard to tell from the picture whether the stars are applied or embroidered. Were there any other differences between the insignia of corporals and lieutenants other than the material of the stars? The family references to him are somewhat vague three generations later: "member of the military postal service for many years".

I usually have a bit of trouble extracting some of the details and color information from B&W photos but in this case I think I have seen enough of these so that I would agree with hunyadi that they are the corporal's stars. The officer's stars usually appear a bit more 'fuzzy' for lack of a better word, and in my experience always photograph with a distinctly grayish hue.

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I usually have a bit of trouble extracting some of the details and color information from B&W photos but in this case I think I have seen enough of these so that I would agree with hunyadi that they are the corporal's stars. The officer's stars usually appear a bit more 'fuzzy' for lack of a better word, and in my experience always photograph with a distinctly grayish hue.

Thanks Keith for your input. The contrast in the photo I posted before was altered. Below is a close-up of the stars from a photo of the original photo. :blush:

starsvz7.jpg

For other details I'd have to take a look at the original with a magnifying glass, but that will have to wait for some while.

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My assumption was the shoulder straps which would make him of an enlisted variety.

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