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Rarest of the rarest of the rarest of the


Guest Brian von Etzel
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Guest Brian von Etzel

Around as an organization for 2.5 years. The DLV Leader Pattern Dirk. Rare enough, but this is the straight quillion Eickhorn, considered the first of these. Finding one cut down is difficult enough, this one uncut and unmessed with. Appears to me to be in silver.

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Guest Brian von Etzel

Never had a wire wrap on the grip. This was produced by wrapping the wet leather carefully with a rope.

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Hi Brian,

You?ve said it all.. Super rare, nice condition and made by a premier maker. What more could one ask for.

When you get a minute, could you post a picture of that early ?Eickhorn? mark? I?m sure the ?blade? guys would appreciate it, as would I. If fact, I?m moving this thread to the edged weapons section as there?s a chance that those most interested will miss it.

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Guest Brian von Etzel

Here's the part of the Dirk that when you do see a cut down is an indicator of an original DLV Dirk. Of course it's easier when like this one, they aren't cut down.

The telltale 'rattle'.

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Brian -

Thank you for sharing this DLV Dirk with us. This is a first too, seeing an example out of one's own collection, for my own self, having but seen these displayed in wear from period photographs of the time. Very nice!

Respectfully,

Frank

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Guest Brian von Etzel

Thanks guys. I have it put away so I'm not sure about the runners, but I would be surprised if they are wood as I think the wood would have absorbed moisture and there is no moisture damage to the blade.

This was one of those few few items I've gotten from a widow of a vet. He brought it back from WWII, put it on the top shelf of his closet and forgot about it for 50 years. His widow cleaning up his stuff re-discovered it. Cost me a small fortune... She did well on it as she knew what it was. But it was Col. Johnson who ID'd it as one of the very first of its kind with the straight quillion.

I'm not a jeweler but I'm sure the fittings are solid silver. The pommel top is heavy and unplated as appear all the other fittings. Those of us who have spent too much time studying the early formation of the Luftwaffe via the DLV know the original leaders of this organization were all very famous names from WWI made up of fliers and generals.

This dirk would have belonged to one of these most early of the Goring elite officers...

My tastes have moved away from daggers and this one of the few that remains in my collection. As distasteful as it will be to most, this will end up in Germany to a dealer.

PS: I'm thrilled there are actually a few of you who aren't so blinded by SS daggers that you can't appreciate this for what it is. Thanks again! Restores some faith in collectors.

Edited by Brian von Etzel
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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi Brian,

Great DLV! I've always wanted one but haven't yet been able to get past the asking price of such a piece. I do have a transitional DLV with all the trappings except the rattlesnake chape on the scabbard. I've always thought the blade edge looked "cut down".

Do you have an example of what a cut down blade edge would look like? Were the 55 cm pieces cut down to shorter versions and reissued? This piece has "FL. Sch 017" in crude lettering on the crossguard underside, which I presume to stand for Fliegerschule 017. Any ideas?

Edited by Billy G
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Guest Brian von Etzel

Billy, even the cut down versions are rare. Very rare. The handle and pommel pieces would give it away. Yeah, the asking prices are steep... I figure they're massively more rare than an RK, PlM, etc. Wittmann has good photos in his Luftwaffe Daggers book.

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Brian,

I'll have to recheck Tom's book, I don't remember seeing any references to cut down DLV's. The one pictured is the piece in question with the blade edge making me think the blade was originally longer and factory cut down to conform to the newer regulations.

I guess what I'm asking is was this done to the blades and new scabbards made for the shorter blades? Everything else on the dagger points to a super early piece, scabbard staples, cardboard scabbard and a lack of any waffenampt marks. Sounds good to me anyway biggrin.gif

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Guest Brian von Etzel

What you will see is a difference in the pommels. I don't think you'll find a Luft Mod 1 or Transitional DLV with the style pommel above. On the cut versions, the blade will simply also not look natural where it is pointed. Which of course is fine! Most post DLV Dirks will also have the Luft Waf. Amt stamp although all won't. But this is also an indicator of a later piece. Finally compare the width of the blade itself. The DLV dirk is thin.

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