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Interesting picture with awards


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What's on the back?

I can't imagine a personnel file photo airbrushed like this :speechless1: so maybe it is a posthumous private photo.

The Pogoni look airbrushed too.

His face is much too young and his rank rather low to have been the holder of a 1938 "Jubilee" Medal.

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I've never seen so many personal photos, but then we don't GET family groups, we get the discards from file cabinets at offices that threw things away.

I can't read the newspaper-- too small and fuzzy. But it seems to indicate that he was indeed in uniform from 1918. There is something about his having been in the ChON in the early 1920s--

direct counterpart of the Chinese Cultural Revolution "Red Guards"-- punk kids strutting around beating people up and terrorizing the "masses" for the Party: seizing crops and other wonderful activities. Nothing like pubescents with guns convinced that they're smarter and better than all previous human evolution and willing to kill unarmed people to show how much "better" they were.

So maybe he was as underaage as his WW2 photos make him look.

He was, no surprise, a Commissar from his pre-war collar patch rank.

I can't see anyplace that indicates when he was actually born.

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He also appears to have air force wings on some patches but not on others. The 'coloured' photo looks very much like a border guard cap! Also the furazhka insignia would be wrong for VVS. Perhaps he was some type of political troubleshooter?

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...His face is much too young and his rank rather low to have been the holder of a 1938 "Jubilee" Medal.

Rick,

What do you mean by that? He wears Lieutenant-Colonel boards. Is that too low in your opinion to have served long enough to receive the 20 Years of RKKA medal?

Marc

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Marc-- that was posted immediately after the first photo, before any of the others. I assumed he was a FLYER from his boards--

only the photos added later revealed he was a Commissar.

I have a group photo from 1941 showing a supply officer who was only a Senior Lieutenant with the 1938.

So I didn't mean only senior officers got it-- but that a "decorated FLYER" with that seniority, I would have expected to be a higher rank, after so many senior commanders were executed 1937/38 and promotions improved for the survivors.

He still only looks like he was 30 during the war. He must have had a baby face!

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