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Hi Greg, :beer:

if you dont mind I will add in pictures of these shoulder boards

I was lucky to pick up in Brasov on Saturday 6th Feb 2010.

Kevin in Deva. :beer:

Edited by Kev in Deva

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"Concursul DRUMUL DE GLORII" <=> THE WAY OF GLORIES Contest

-> the name is a little fishy, if you'd ask me....

Edited by Corabia Alex

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... just noticed the mini ribbon is wrong, but that`s the way I got it.

Very easy to fix, I am sure you will find the correct ribbon easily enough.

Nice set :jumping: congratulations on getting these items.

Kevin in Deva. :beer:

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I waited a long time to find the perfect 2nd Class Order "Pentru servicii deosebite aduse în apãrarea orânduirii sociale ºi de stat", and the wait finally paid off. I managed to snag a first variation (text book) of the Order with it's ribbon and box. It was, originally, the "odd man out" as the only difference between the 1st and 3rd classes of the Order was the gold plating on the 1st class. The 2nd class in it's first incarnation, however, had three major differences: it was silver plated, had imitation rubies rather than imitation diamonds and the wreath below the State seal was gold plated (to contrast with the silver plated star). You will note all these differences here. In it's second variation, the wreath became silver plated like the other classes and, in it's 3rd variation, the rubies became diamonds. Also of note is the gold plated State seal on the ribbon bar- this is the same bar for all 3 classes.

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The Order in it's box with ribbon bar and the box lid. If you look closely, you can just make out the Cl. II at the bottom.

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As promised, a couple of documents for the Medal for Distinguished Services in Defense of the Social Order and the Country (Securitate). These documents are for the first (a medal I have) and second (a medal I don't have) of three variations of this award. I have posted photos of the first variation earlier in the thread but have brought it out for the first image as a reminder.

This award was to Lieutenant Constantin Duca and was made on August 19, 1954 (I was about 5 and a half months old at the timebiggrin.gif). It is award number 262; quite early as this award did not begin until 1953. Note a space, on the inside left, for a photo and signature. Neither of these spots was touched- remember, this is a Securitate award. These areas were eliminated in future documents. A nice touch, common to award booklets of the RPR period, is a colour band mimicking the ribbon on the outside cover.

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This next document is for the same award, but from the transitional period of 1966-1968 (second variation). As I said, I don't have this medal, but it looks the same as the medal shown, ribbon and all, except the State seal will have RSR on the lower banner and, just below the State seal, will have larger letters RSR (instead of RPR). Both the medal and the document are quite rare. Also of note: notice how the doc has become "simplified"- more "secretive". Only a decree number (170 A) and the year (1966) and the name of the recipient (Colonel Adrian Pop- during the RSR years, it became more common to place the family name second whereas during the RPR period they stuck with the more culturally Romanian way of placing the family name first). The outside is plain, bearing only the word "legitimatie" or license.

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But in opposition to your photo-less document , I MUST lunch a counter-strike, so to speak :jumping:

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Behold, my latest finding! :cheers:

I came upon totally by accident, and was initially interested by the "raionul" T. Vlademirescu, as there is such a neighborhood in Corabia city, my main area of interest.

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But soon... I noticed the first entry: 1. Arma (serviciul), check it out [EN: 1. Weapon(service)]

Check.it.out.

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So, after being inspired enough to take it, the gem shines even more:

the guy joined in '38, fought in WWII and was an active officer afterward until '64

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So if we are to believe this document, the guy lived to see 80 years of age (born 1915, promoted to reserve Colonel in 1995).

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