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My New Kris..! :) (*** MODERATORS' CHOICE)


kapten_windu
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Hi Gentlemen, this is my new Kris.. :cheers:

the character of this Kris:

Dapur: Tilam Upih.--> i don't know the translation in English :lol:

Pamor (blade motive): Udan Mas.--> gold rainfall (this is one of the most favourite pamor)

Tangguh: Kamardikan.-->means this is a new made kris (Kamardikan means period 1945-now)

Blade: 35 Cm.

Scabbard & Handle: Kayu Sono Keling.--> Sono keling wood

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Hi Windu

Nice Kris. Thanks for showing it to us.

May be mistaken but doesn't "dapur" say something about the shape of the weapon, like dapur bener (straight blade) and dapur luk (snake-like blade) (=two main types) There are more then 100 different sub-types of the dapur on the island of Java alone, never mind the other islands!

Sonokeling wood is known as (East) Indian rosewoord (albergia latifolia)

This truly is a largely unknown, underestimated and undervaluated collecting field!

Edited by love4history
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wild card: thank you! :cheers:

Roel: you're right! :)

Dhapur is the style of the blade, the various sub-style of dhapur mostly came from the various shape on the lower parts of the blade..

I think someday i have to post a thread about general knowledge of Kris..

-Windu-

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Thank you Mervyn.. :cheers:

There are 2 way of collecting Kris:

1. Appreciating it's art: as art decoration/investment->I'm one of this

2. Spiritual->not only about it's art, but also as a spiritual media, magic, etc (influenced by traditional beliefs&philosophy)

Windu

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This is a beautiful specimen Windu, you must be very happy to own it.

I only have one Kris in my collection but I have posted it before, perhaps other will post their's.

Thanks for allowing us to view this beautiful artifact which, as Mervyn has stated, will only grown in value as time passes.

Regards

Brian

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Brian, thank you! :)

Kris is a symbol of 'Javanese gentleman', that's why as a Javanese i must have some Kris.. :)

Can you post your Kris here? I'd like too see it's characteristics..

Gavin, this is a modern one..

The old Kris with rare pamor like Udan Mas (the motive is like mine above) and have special spiritual/magic ability can be valued up to $8000!

On the other hands, the old Kris with common pamor like 'ngulit semangka'(eng-watermelon skin) from 15th century with no magic ability can be just $150..

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Every Javanese gentleman should indeed have a kris. As an occasional visitor, I even have a couple myself. I've posted these before, so forgive me for the repetition. But I would welcome learning a little more about them.

The scabbard on this one looks a bit like yours, Windu, but it has the wavy blade. I bought it dirt cheap from a bomoh in a little one-room hut outside the royal palace in Suryakarta. It was bright midday outside, but the hut was dark and smoky. He showed me how the spirit of the kris made it able to stand on its tip without any support. He then asked me to try to push it over, and try as I might, I couldn't. There were no strings nor wires, no obvious support.

Now I am as cynical and suspicious a western-minded guy as you'll find, but there was something supernatural happening there. The bomoh went on to tell me how to care for the kris, making sure to wash it with coconut milk and rose petals, in order to maintain its spirit. I do it now and then (a little afraid not to) but I must confess, the coconut milk makes an awful stink after a few days.

Perhaps you can tell us a little more, Windu.

Hugh

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Then, here's my other full-sized one, a completely different style. Are these unique to regions, Windu? I seem to remember that the Malay krises often have this shape scabbard.

Unfortunately, the scabbard on this one has seen better days.

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This blade doesn't have the gold figuring, but the shapes are quite interesting. I remember stories about working and folding the iron back and forth, leaving visible layers. .

Edited by Hugh
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And finally, the hilt of # 2. There was also a story about the shape of an elephant wrought into the top of the blade, but neither of mine show this.

Edited by Hugh
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Hi Hugh

Thanks for sharing your Kris'. Very nice.

Some small notes, not an expert on the matter mind you.

The metal is indeed being folded and worked by the smith. This is what causes the distinct pattern/drawing on the blade. This pattern is called Pamor. The drawing is being made visible with arsenic (!) (which is what should be used once a year to keep the drawing nicely visible as well, but then again....) The different types of drawing/Pamor also influence the mystical power of the Kris. One type adding to the charisma of the owner, the other to his health, a third to this family life etc...

I have personally witnessed a "standing" Kris myself about 15 years ago in a private home in the Yogyakart Kraton area. I can confirm: no strings or the likes. Don't know about the mysticism of it, but it sure shows remarkable craftmanship to shape the Kris in such a way that it has this kind of balance. I have a picture of the Kris standing up in an old box. Will have to dig it up and post here I think.

There are indeed blades of Kris made from meteorite stone. However, if you put all the blades together from which it has been told that they were made from this stone it would have had to been the size of the moon..... Think you need a mettalurgic expert to confirm.

Sidenote: traditionally a Kris should not be sold/bought. The terminology used in Javanese refers to a courtship and a dowry being paid (or something traded in stead) Often it is just given away. If you take the mysticism and the cleansing rituals seriously owning a Kris is a high responsibility (and a burden) which is why (if the original possessor has passed away) relatives may choose not to keep it in possession.

My late father-in-law gave his two Kris away as he could not properly take care of them....

By the way Hugh: story also goes that you should not unnecessarily take the Kris out of the scabbard too often as it may want to see blood if you do so. Think to take it out for the cleaning ritual is OK though.

@Windu: go ahead and continue posting interesting info on the subject please! We're on a roll here :)

Edited by love4history
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We had a long post on these beautiful objects some time ago - but, it is a subject that should come-up regularly. Particularly when the old ones are re-shown. Some interesting facts have emerged - however, I am not sure arsenic should be used regularly - perhaps only when it is being made ?

Apart from that it is illegal to have arsenic - it is a schedule 1 poison. Looking at Hugh's last one, I would have thought a little rub down with a light gun oil would help to preserve the patina.

I was particularly interested in Windu's comment that carrying a blade was essential for a 'gentleman' to show his status. This was exactly the case in England (I say that in the singular - we predated most of the other Countries within Britain - but, probably not Scotland). Only a Gentleman - or, his family could carry a sword - let the peasantry be caugh with one and it was a death sentence ! With-in England an Esquire was the lowest rank to have the priviledge.

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