Jump to content

Japanese Awards - Order of the Sacred Treasure


Gordon Williamson
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 3 months later...

Thank you, Gordon. I've just begun collecting Japanese medals and this study of the Sacred Treasures progression was very helpful. Japanese medals are still greatly under-appreciated and still a bit undervalued, in my opinion.

Edited by Doug See
Link to comment
Share on other sites

...etui for a fourth class of the Sacred Treasure (the colour for the tazzles of the Sacred Treasure etuis are always purple), early etui - model for members of the diplomatic service and foreign recipients. The inscription is a special type of Kanji - so called "seal characters" (court style).

Best regards

Matthias

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Always beautifull to look at. I once had a small japanese collection consisting of sacred treasure up to the 4th class, risung sun up to the 4th class and Golden Kite 7th and 6th class all boxed.

One Question: I had two rising sun 6th Class medals, one enammelled on both sides and the other one only ONE side. Can you tell me what is the reason for that? Does ist depend on the time-period the awards were given?

regards

josef

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One Question: I had two rising sun 6th Class medals, one enammelled on both sides and the other one only ONE side. Can you tell me what is the reason for that? Does ist depend on the time-period the awards were given?

regards

josef

Surely you mean the 7th class. You are right, it does depend on the time-period the later ones (since WW II) are only onesided, in cause of savingsbases.

Best regards

Matthias

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks Matthias, of course you are right. i was talking about the 7th class rising sun. so all pieces enamelled on two sides date for 1945. good to know. i'am afraid in matters of higher classes, the difference between earlier and modern pieces is not so easy to explain?

haynau

Link to comment
Share on other sites

..one of the best indicators of older pieces are the thick of the material, in general you can say "older ones are thinner ones". However you shold have compared many pieces to indicate the old ones with one blink of an eye.

The "Sacred Treasure" is (in my opinion) one of the most interesting orders of Japan, because of the number of the used symbols. Japanese orders are outstanding in simpleness of design which unites a maximum of symbols.

Best regards

Matthias

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

The kanji on my 8th class case is different from Gordons, can someone tell me why, was it for a different era?

Yes, I think so. I believe that the earlier boxes have this type of writing. Is there anyone who knows when they changed the style? I have a feeling that it happened sometime in the thirties, am I right?

/Erik

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...I agree also with Erik (or better I have the same "feeling" :-). The change to the more stricter seal characters had taken place somewhere in the thirties (and also resumed in the sixties). Seal characters are a special form of kanji which were used predominantly by court officials (mainly for seals:).

Matthias

Edited by kunsho
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
  • 2 months later...

Excellent thread. Just to add some comments .......

In Japan now anything below US$1,000 would be reasonable for an unboxed Sacred Treasure 2nd Class. You can find them cheaper in UK or US from time to time. For a boxed example it will depend on the period but a nice Meiji award could easily set you back US$2,000.

Regarding some of the earlier posts, the 6th class box shown in post 9 is a Showa era box. That shown in post 11, and the box in post 38, are Meiji/Taisho period boxes. Based on groups that I have had I think it correct to say the change of seal style was made in the late 1920's at about the same time as the change in reign.

On the subject of 7th class Rising Sun, you need to be aware that more recent post war 7th class orders are also only enamelled on the obverse, the reverse is silver.

Regards,

Paul

Edited by Paul L Murphy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Blog Comments

    • Two years down the line.   My mother-in-law passed away this summer, as did one of her sisters-in-law.   My exhibition opened, and we had a marvellous speakers' night with four Peacekeeping veterans, including a Meritorious Service Medal winner.  But Covid closed it down in March 2020, and while still there it hasn't reopened.
    • Sounds great other than the Orange & Mango squash only because I prefer cran-pomegranate juice.
    • "(...) disgusting herbal concoction (...)" I took note of this description, to enrich my otherwise limited, English "Wortschatz"...
    • At work the standard indian tea such as PG tips is referred to as chimp tea. This goes back to the days when we had a Spanish girl working for us whose command of the English language was extremely limited. One lunch she said she was going to the shop could she get anything. I asked if she could get a pack of tea bags. She returned with some disgusting herbal concoction. I tried to explain what was required but without success. I then remembered PG tips had a picture of a chimpanzee on the packe
    • When I read Lapsang Souchong i decided to post something about these Tea . Many years ago I dont  know about Lapsang until I read James Michener book Centennial and the description of the savour of the Lapasang as a mix of tar and salt & smoked made me proof . It was exact ! and i liked it since then .
×
×
  • Create New...