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Glenn J

Anatomy of a General’s Kepi

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Hello chaps,

I would be most grateful for a serviceable translation regarding the Kepi of French general officers.

the golden braid which edges the upper edge of the cap band is referred to in the 1935 dress regulations as a “une baguette droite de 5mm”.  A “straight rod” or “wand” does not seem particularly helpful. I was thinking perhaps along the lines of a “beaded trim” or such like. Perhaps one of our French speaking gentlemen can please assist.

many thanks 

Glenn

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Posted (edited)

I have some knowledge in this area as it applies to braid-terminology and the regs are not calling for "straight rods" on the kepi.  They are calling for upright rachillas which are the parts of grass flowers that bear the florets.  The French are really into rachilla and spikelet motifs for their braiding, much like central Europe is into laurels and oaks.  Simi.

Edited by Simius Rex
spelling error

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Hi,

thank you for your reply.

I think we may be at cross purposes. I am referring to the line of braid above the oak leaves on the black cap band (bandeau). This model 1931 kepi is from the Bertrand Malvaux site.

Regards

Glenn

GdC.jpg.d88bf87632f73f1bdb74422b351d9c35.jpg

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hi Glenn.  I'm not going to lie to you... "baguette" is a peculiar name to give that particular component of the kepi.  I wonder if that's where the French guy below got the idea for his hat. Simi.

Baguette Hat.jpg

Edited by Simius Rex

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Hi SImi,

indeed😁

This is an extract from the regulations and the seller of the kepi above describes it as:

"et d’une baguette en paillettes et filets cannetilles d’or".

Regards

Glenn

baguette.jpg.f97f41c6a22dad706837739d9c3ef457.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Glenn,  here's a partial copy of page 12 from a glossary of french military terminology I use when I need to look up an unfamiliar word or expression.  The word "baguette" usually has another word following it describing the specific kind of baguette embroidered onto the fabric... like for example, a "baguette of florettes" etc.  In your case however, the term "baguette" appears to be used to describe a plain embroidered band or stripe.  Simi. 

French Glossary.jpg

Edited by Simius Rex

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Glen , The French kepi pour General model 1931 was of madder red fine cloth with a black cloth band . on the band it carried a braided motif of oak leaves and acorns in gold . this motif was of a width of 56 mm for General de Brigade and was placed centrally on the black band all around .on the upper part of the band where it mets with the red upper one ,are fixed from down to over the following ornaments 1 the famous baguette of a gold cannetille wire that holds gold sequins . then a gold cord of 3.25 mm width sewed all around an finally a gold cord of 15mm width . In the joint of the band and the peak was sewed a soutache of gold Russia braid of 5mm width . The kepi for General de Division carried the same  baguette and cords but instead of the 56mm braid carried two ,one the upper of 15mm width and another lower of 12mm width , The Marechal de France  kepi carried three rows of braid ,one of 15mm and two of 12mm .The description i had made ifs for Combattant Generals , the kepis of the other classes of Generals were different . that of Medical Generals for example was madder red but the band was crimson velvet and the embroidered motif was of Acanthus leaves in gold . 

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guys,

many thanks to you both. I think a straight line or stripe of cannetille braid with gold sequins covers it. It should be noticed for completeness, that those generals of division with the function (rank and title) of a general commanding an army corps or those who were members of the superior war council wore an additional 3mm wide silver braid (soutache) above the "baguette".

Regards

Glenn

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Glen J :  Thats right .  In my precedent post  I dont mentioned that for no made too long the post . Another Generals Kepi was that of the Veterinarian General . the  same as that of the Doctor but wiith a braid of Sage leaves . finally the green kepi of the General Postmaster carried a braid of miosotys flowers and leaves .

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