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DRB 1643

Help please with unknown Japanese badge

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Hi All, I’m hoping again for help from the membership in identifying this Japanese badge.

 Thank you all very much,

Tom

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At obverse

禁衛隊 - Imperial Guards [protecting the emperor] Corps

立命館 - Ritsumeikan [university] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritsumeikan_University

At reverse 

中学校 - middle school

Under the lower loop you will find the mint mark. 

About their activities  https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/立命館禁衛隊

A short excerpt

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from  

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Thank you very much Nick.

How common would you consider this badge?

Thanks again,

Tom

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Well, it`s not very rare.

One of the few known variations.

Another two variations (by reverse)

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Hi Nick, so this was a school badge for students training to be in the Imperial Guards?

Tom

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I would like to know how a person would go about wearing this badge.  What function do the two C-shaped handles on the back serve?  Are they for ribbons or are they intended for suspension straps of some kind?

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Posted (edited)

In the absence of shoulder-belt or ribbon the easiest way to fix such badge to the unform will be sewing.

Next to the easiest way will be making two holes in the uniform and fixed the badge by piece of wood that fits the loops. 

 

power.jpg

Edited by JapanX

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Posted (edited)
58 minutes ago, DRB 1643 said:

Hi Nick, so this was a school badge for students training to be in the Imperial Guards?

Tom

Tom after the end of coronation the name of this group has been retained but it became just another para-military youth organization.   

See https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/立命館禁衛隊

Edited by JapanX

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Thank you very much Nick. I'll say it again- you are indispensable for this forum!

Tom

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