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French Medals


Guest Darrell
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Guest Darrell

Here are a trio that were part of a grouping:

1939 Croix de Guerre, French Resistance and Free French Medals.

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Guest Darrell

Here's the French Escapees Medal. Created in August 1926. Awarded to Escapees from 1870-1871 through WW2 for both Civilian and Military persons.

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Guest Darrell

Verdun Medal - Created in 1916, this bronze medal was awarded to French Soldiers who served in the battle of Verdun and in the sector.

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Guest Darrell

WW1 and WW2 Combat Cross - Authorized in 1930 to recognize all who fought in Combat. Awarded to all Ex-Servicemen who had combat cards.

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Guest Darrell

WW1 Service Medal - Created in 1920 for Service in WW1 to members of the Military & Civilians who served 6 months between Aug. 1914 & Nov. 1918.

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Guest Darrell

Darrel,

you seem to have quite a collection. Another one, who cannot focus on one area  tongue.gif   laugh.gif

Well done  smile.gif

best,

Gerd

Yeah ... branch out and collect EVERYTHING ... why just one facet? tongue.gif

Actually TR items were the last ones I really started on ...

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Perhaps you guys can inform me on these a little more, I've searched high and low on the sites connected with French and other medals but I'll be blowed if I can find much. I'm stuck and can't find anything on some of these.

French wound medal, I think this is a WW1 period one, there is another which is more solid and dosen't thave the cut outs inbetween the star arms. The reverse is just plain.

Edited by Marcus H
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Guest Darrell

Perhaps you guys can inform me on these a little more, I've searched high and low on the sites connected with French and other medals but I'll be blowed if I can find much. I'm stuck and can't find anything on some of these.

French wound medal, I think this is a WW1 period one, there is another which is more solid and dosen't thave the cut outs inbetween the star arms. The reverse is just plain.

Marcus ... I've seen pics of this one ... When I get home from work I'll see if I can find it ...

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This one I found info on, The Cross of the Combat Volunteer 1914-18

Identical to the WW2 one apart the dates on the reverse, and inverted colours on the ribbon bar the yellow. This was authorised on the 4th Feb 1953 along with the WW2 one I think.

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Cheers mate, that would be great it's 2300 now in the UK but I hope to still be around a little later......it a Bank Holiday anyway.

Good threads by the way, I love all these other medals and it makes such a change from ruddy packets LOL

Now these two Darrel, I'm not sure on commerative colonial of sorts I think.

The left one has 'Orient' on it and some dates on the flag I can just make out 1915 & 16 I think ?

The right one 'Levant', well one text says it's a Vichy medal this being the 1941 instituted one and it was first adopted in 1922.

And it's the Commerative Medal for Syria and Lebanon when a another bar is on it, yet the other text say's the silver bar is the 1920's one and the brass one '41 ???

You can't see on these scans very well but they both have maker marks too. Very similar designs on the reverse as well ?

Edited by Marcus H
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Guest Darrell

Found it Marcus ... I knew I'd seen this one before.

ok ... first off .. I found it in the Book entitled "The Decorations and Medals of the Republic of Vietnam and her Allies 1950-1975".

First up they showed this picture, which was VERY similar, but with slight difference in that the Star was smaller:

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Guest Darrell

But .. when I turned to that Page 69 they refer to .. I found this. Read the last few sentences ... it describes yours :food-smiley-004:

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Guest Darrell

I've found the medal on the left in Post # 12. It is the "Medaille d'Orient".

1-1/8-inch diameter, antique gold, finished medal, depicting the profile of a helmeted woman with an oak leaf crown, the words, ?Republique Francaise;? are inscribed on the outside edge of the medal. The medal has a wreath suspension and is attached to a wide light blue ribbon with a yellow central stripe and yellow stripes at the edges. The reverse depicts an anchor, an artillery piece, oak leaves and olive branches with flags and battle honors; the word, ?Orient,? is inscribed at the top center of the reverse. The medal was awarded to all members of the expeditionary army that fought in the Balkans. A slightly obscure theatre of war against German and Bulgarian armies in Macedonia and the Balkans. Standard, French type, double prong attaching pin on the backside.

It's the one on the left below:

Edited by Darrell
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  • 2 months later...

Nice selection of French medals. They're one of my passions too. This group was, believe it or not, all to one man. He survived WW1, the 1939/40 War, the Resistance and Buchenwald. I have his miniatures too.

PK

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Three Vichy-issue Croix de Guerre. The riband of the one of the left was supressed and replaced by the more common green and black riband seen on the right. Bearing the dates 1939-1940 on the reverse, these crosses were given to French veterans of the 1939-40 War who had earned the Croix de Guerre in exchange for their Republican versions, who enlisted in one of the Vichy or collaborationist forces on whose uniforms French medals could be worn. These organisations included the Vichy armed forces, paramilitary forces like the Milice, the police and other groups, including the paramilitary veterans' associations.

However, the real rarity here is the one in the middle, instituted in March 1944. Only members of the Premier R?giment de France and P?tain's personal bodyguard were eligible for this cross, which bears the Vichy Francisque symbol and the legend "Etat Fran?ais" on the central medallion and the date 1944 on the reverse. Less than 200 are believed to have been awarded. This cross is as rare as the LVF cross and is really the only 'proper', traditional Croix de Guerre instituted by Vichy France. It was awarded principally for actions against the Resistance and enemy forces like the SAS and OSS, although I did hear of one awarded to a man who saved a comrade's life during an Allied strafing attack.

PK

Edited by PKeating
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Just to round off this evening's display, here is a unit citation to an unit of the American Field Service in France in 1918 for their gallantry in evacuating wounded from a gas-contaminated battlefield, under enemy fire. Real, classic, grim Western Front stuff. Note the name of the American commander, Appleton J Miles. I haven't finished researching this one yet but I think he was the grandson of the US Army General Nelson Appleton Miles who 'pacified' Geronimo and his warriors. Anyway, it's a rare citation.

PK

Edited by PKeating
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Guest Darrell

Three Vichy-issue Croix de Guerre. The riband of the one of the left was supressed and replaced by the more common green and black riband seen on the right. Bearing the dates 1939-1940 on the reverse, these crosses were given to French veterans of the 1939-40 War who had earned the Croix de Guerre in exchange for their Republican versions, who enlisted in one of the Vichy or collaborationist forces on whose uniforms French medals could be worn. These organisations included the Vichy armed forces, paramilitary forces like the Milice, the police and other groups, including the paramilitary veterans' associations.

You would think these are fairly rare considering it wouldnt be th smartest thing to show off after the Liberation of FRance by the allies ??

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