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Gentleman's Military Interest Club

Norm F

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About Norm F

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  1. It's a long story, but these KM clasps are attributed to Juncker, not Klein, as the manufacturing characteristics match the "non-Klein" one-piece Heer clasps (which forensically shares some pin characteristics with the Juncker EK1 clasps) and also the Luftwaffe one-piece clasps for which Juncker-labelled packaging exists. Not surprising given Juncker's status for higher end orders. They're Tombak. Material restrictions in late wartime didn't apply to the higher orders (hence no zinc German Crosses) There's only one manufacturer of the KM clasp known, but two variations based upon the trimming characteristics. The "earlier" one, "Type 1" as alluded to by Hubert in an earlier post, has variable hand-cut internal cutouts whereas the "Type 2" (same die characteristics) used a standardized trimming die for the internal cutouts. Best regards, ---Norm
  2. Hi Andy, That's a misprint in Weber/Skora, The Kriegsmarine Awards, Vol. 1. Under catch material it should say "Tombak, soldered", not "steel". So yes, it should not attract to a magnet. Best regards, ---Norm
  3. ​Congratulations! I've been trying (unsuccessfully) to find such a photo showing a recognizable Assmann, and you're quite right it is indeed an Assmann Minesweeper -- only the second one I've seen to date. Cheers, ---Norm
  4. ​Yes, indeed, looks like a Friedrich August Cross 1st class. Best regards, ---Norm ' alt='' class='ipsImage' width="1000px" height="740px"> ' alt='' class='ipsImage' width="1000px" height="740px">
  5. Yes, very interesting photos. Hard to say about which medal? Best regards, ---Norm
  6. Very nice to see a mini in wear! Of all the minis that exist, it makes sense that there would be the greatest chance of seeing a Blockade Breaker mini in wear since they were awarded to civilians. I've often wondered why it's near impossible to find photos of other KM badge minis in wear, and I can only assume it's because in wartime there was virtually no opportunity for a sailor to be off for an extended leave in cvilian clothes to wear such a thing. Best regards, ---Norm
  7. Hi Larry, He's also wearing his ribbon bar with the WW1 EK2 and KVK2 so quite a record there. From the look of him and his wife he could be in his 40's and have been a teenager in WW1 -- maybe a career Navy guy? And he could be wearing his blue uniform since he's stepping out with his wife. Best regards. ---Norm
  8. Hm. I can't read that article without spending a couple of days with a dictionary and using Google translate doesn't make much sense out of it, but for what it's worth the "tone" of the Google translation seemed highly sarcastic? Perhaps Nick or someone else can paraphrase it for us? Best regards, ---Norm
  9. Hi Guys, I believe we can say Japan without a shadow of a doubt. Not only is the design and manufacture of the badge uniquely different from any German made war badge, but the only two photos seen to date showing the badge in wear (posted by Monsun) were both taken in Japan. The clincher is the information on this reference website on silver hallmarks around the world, http://www.925-1000.com/foreign_marks2.html , an excerpt of which I've attached here which shows that between 1928 and 1954 Japan used the "STERLING" mark. Best regards, ---Norm
  10. Hi Guys, On close comparison of Monsun's second portrait photo with Martin's Schwerin and Japanese Hilfskreuzer badges, I think we can definitely say it's another example of the Japanese badge in wear. Despite the differences in angle, you can see key areas that correspond with the Japanese badge like the high eagle's head, lack of post at the stern, tall bottom wreath ribbon and matching position of the lines of longitude. Best regards, ---Norm
  11. Actually the Schickle/Pforzheim hardware. Best regards, ---Norm
  12. Hi Gordon, What a beautiful textbook mint cap! Thanks for posting. Very similar to the one my Dad wore in 1939-40 as Funkmeister of the 3. Räumbootsflottille, albeit with a different cockade I think. Best regards, ---Norm
  13. Hi Martin, Great portrait! Here's a photo of my Dad (in the centre) during basic training in 1936 in Stralsund in the field grey uniforms with helmets. Notice their uniforms didn't have the national eagle on them. Best regards, ---Norm
  14. Hi Martin, What a wonderful portrait! The composition, lighting, dramatic impact is outstanding, not to mention the detail on the awards and the bullion breast eagle. Thanks for posting this! Best regards, ---Norm
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