Jump to content
Gentleman's Military Interest Club
rusticalex

Is this Queen Victoria's funeral procession?

Recommended Posts

Looks like Victorias Funeral, but early on in the procession as the 'osses being used to tow the gun carrige got spooked and so all the Matelots they could muster were shanghied into what has become the traditional way of transporting our monarchs to their interment. More dignified IMHO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When she was alive, Queen Victoria totally prohibited any planning or rehearsals for her funeral.

As a result, her funeral procession was a shambles, with horses bolting, etc. etc.

Edward VII's funeral was, consequently, one of the best rehearsed in British history! :cheeky:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This has to be Queen Victoria's funeral as note the use of the white Colonial Pattern pith helmet. This was replaced by the Wolseley over the first few years of the decade.

I have to wonder why it is being worn at all in England as it was a Foreign Service helmet and you can see the Blue Home Service helmet also being worn.

Queen Vic's funeral was held on the 2nd February 1901 and looking at the trees devoid of foliage one would have to say this is a winter photo. Edward VII's funeral was held on the 20th May 1910 so I think it reasonable to expect the trees being in bloom.

Stuart

Edited by Stuart Bates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bernhard,

just to clarify a little more, the Wolseley helmet superseded the Colonial pattern in the early years of the decade, say 1903 onwards, although it had been in use since, at least, 1896 but only by officers. This process took a few years as old stocks of the Colonial Pattern helmet would have been used before any new pattern was issued. This changeover was complete by around 1910.

In the photo you can clearly see spikes on the white helmets but the Royal Marines had the ball and cup furniture - see below for an example of the Royal Marine's Wolseley

Stuart

Edited by Stuart Bates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Stuart.

Thank you for your clarification of the different headgear worn by the Royal Marines.

Also your mention of "How can man die better" by Lt.Col. Mike Snook. I found it can be gotten via Amazon US but the price tag of $US 100 to 300 is somewhat excessive.

Bernhard H. Holst

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bernhard,

I just searched for the book via www.bookfinder.com and found quite a few listings and the prices started from Euro 14 for softcover and Euro 27 for hardcover.

Regards,

Stuart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bernhard,

just to clarify a little more, the Wolseley helmet superseded the Colonial pattern in the early years of the decade, say 1903 onwards, although it had been in use since, at least, 1896 but only by officers. This process took a few years as old stocks of the Colonial Pattern helmet would have been used before any new pattern was issued. This changeover was complete by around 1910.

In the photo you can clearly see spikes on the white helmets but the Royal Marines had the ball and cup furniture - see below for an example of the Royal Marine's Wolseley

Stuart

RMLI had spikes Stuart, RMA ball & cup, RM ball & cup after amalgamation?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the picture again - I am intrigued by what looks like a double line of Police - or, could they be a Rifle Regt. ? Police seems more likey, since they are unarmed - however, their officers in the front have swords reversed. If they are Police, it looks as if they are paying respects - not acting as protective line. Any thoughts ?

Also, where exactly was the photo taken ? I think it is the right corner of Buckingham Palace - the Victoria Memorial , had of course, yet to be built ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mervyn

The only thing that makes me think that this is not the corner of Buckingham Palace is the placement of the wooden planks in the bottom left of the image. Surely this would not have been allowed within the palace grounds and I can see no evidence of a sentry box infront of the railings, perhaps it is one of the ornamental gates at the top of The Mall? Not sure when these were built (I'll have to google it)

Simon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simon - it can't be the Embankment, too many people standing on the right - there wouldn't be enough room. The roundness of the building looks as if there should be a corner? Did they take Her to Westminster Abbey or, down to St. Paul's. If St. Paul's it could be the Strand ? Perhaps Leigh has an Order of Service tucked-away ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have blown up the photograph, although it pixellates very quickly, and it seems that Edward is behind the first lot of horsemen and attendants after the cortege. I think he is flanked by Kaiser Wilhelm and the Duke of Connaught. I got the latter from Simon's link to Pathe News.

Was not Nicholas II at the funeral?

Stuart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×