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Noor

My humble collection - second start

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Hi all,

I haven't been around a long time because I gave up collecting and sold piece by piece my whole previous collection during 3 years back in college. But now I am graduated, started new career and also I am back in collecting from the scratch. 

I will start posting here new items that I have managed to pick up.

Any questions, extra information, research ideas, etc, please do not hesitate to contact me!

Thanks for looking,

Timo aka Noor

 

William John Winn (1877 – XXXX)


9511, Drummer, 5th Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers
 

-    QSA (1st Drgn.Gds.) - Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, SA 1901, SA 1902
-    Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal George V issue, 1st type 1911-1920 (9511 Corpl. W. Winn R.Dub.Fus)
-    Army Meritorious Service Medal George VI issue 'Fid.Def' obverse (9511 Sjt. W.J Winn R.Dub.F.)

William was born in Hertfordshire at 1877 and he enlisted age 16 years and 6 months from Norwich 29th March 1894 into 1st Dragoon Guards. Private Winn service number was 3760. He stated his trade as a musician. William’s was 5 feet 3 inches high and he weight 119 lbs. He had brown eyes and brown hair.

During his service met with Barbara Evans and they got married at Colchester on the 16th April 1898. William served in UK until 15th January 1901, when he was sent to the South African war. He stayed in there until 14th November 1903 and became entitled Queens South Africa Medal with the following clasps: Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, SA 1901, SA 1902. His service continued in home. On the 8th May 1905 their son Cyril Francis Winn born. Following year, on the 28th March 1906 he discharged after 12 years of service.

Almost immediately he enlisted on the 4 May 1906 to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He was promoted to the rank Corporal on the 4th November 1911.

Irish Census 1911 shows his family living in Beggars Bush Barracks in Dublin. Also this source shows one of the sad moment from his family life – as stated on the service papers, he had a son Cyril Francis but on the census form there is a remark that they had two children and only one is living.

He received Long Service & Good Conduct medal on the 28 June 1912. Then next promotion to the rank Sergeant took place on the 9th August 1914. Finally on the 19th December 1918 he was elected under army order to receive Army pension while still serving (AO/1 of 1918). In total he served around 22 years. His rank is mentioned on the roll as a “Trumpeter Major”, so must likely he served whole time as a musician.

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Joseph Connell (1875 – XXXX)
6145, Private, 4 Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Joseph was born in St.Thomas Parish in Dublin at 1875. He enlisted to the 4th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers at the 21st June 1908. At that time he was already circa 33 years old.
Before Joseph was sent to the war, his name appears in the Police Gazette 19 January 1915 as a deserter in Sittingbourne from his unit at the 16 January 1915. Most likely this took place on the way to Western front. He landed in France 10 February 1915. During his service in France, some moment he was transferred into the Labour Corps. His new service number was 51331.
After the Great War Connell became entitled 15 Star trio.

6145 Pte J.Connell 4 R Dub Fus Awarded Special Reserve LS Medal AO Oct 1913. so not sure how he appears on a Militia LS Medal with EDV11 obverse. By 1913 I would think it should be GV obverse.

Most likely this award on the picture was “own awarded” replacement. Naming is engraved and not stamped like it should be on the official medal.

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John Behan (1893 – 25.05.2015)
8710, Private, 4th Battalion Att to 2nd Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

John was born in Harold’s Cross, Dublin as a son of Martin and Maria Behan. Based on the 1911 Irish Census their family lived in Limekiln Lane, Rathmines/Rathgar. He had two brothers and two sisters. At this time John was Grocers Porter.
Some moment around summer 1912 he enlisted to the 4th Battalion of Royal Dublin Fusiliers. At this time this was City of Dublin Militia unit and didn’t require full time service. His service number was 8710.
When the Great War started, only 2nd Battalion from the Royal Dublin Fusiliers took part heavy fighting in France from 1914. They lost many men during the retreat as a POWs and also battle casualties were heavy. In order to compensate their losses, drafts from the militia units were sent in and attached to the front line units. Private John Behan was attached to the 2nd Battalion and landed in France on the 3rd May 1915. At that time his unit was in the Ypres Salient. Located half-a-mile north of Wieltje, originally a moated farm with outbuildings. It was first given the name 'Shell Trap Farm' by the British. The unhappy associations of this designation were held to be detrimental to the garrison's morale and the position was subsequently re-named by the Staff as 'Mouse Trap Farm'. 
On the morning of the attack on 24 May 1915 what was left of the farm after the bombardment ('a mere heap of mud and rubbish') was defended by two platoons of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers; being a mere 30 yards from the enemy trenches the rapid occupation of the farm by the quick-moving German infantry was little short of inevitable. The Royal Dublin Fusiliers started the day at Ypres on 24th May, 1915 with 666 men - by the end of the day they had lost 645 men, of whom 149 were listed dead. 
At 2:45 am the Germans launched a gas attack on the Allied lines which was the first time that the Germans had used poison gas on a large scale on the Western Front. The German poison gas came ‘drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it.’ By 9:30 pm, out of a battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion ‘retired’ was one officer and twenty other ranks. For the record, in just eighteen and three quarter hours, the Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The British at that time had no defences against gas attack, indeed the large-scale use of gas by the Germans on the Western Front had begun at Second Ypres. The 2nd Dublins Commanding Officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Loveband of Naas, died the following day. The Battalion did not take part in any more major battles for the rest of the year.
John Behan was one of the men who got gassed. He was evacuated to the No.3 Gas Casualty Clearing Station but died day later on the 25 May 1915 age 22. He is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension (Nord). 
Engraved on Menin Gate Memorial are the names of 461 Royal Dublin Fusiliers killed during the Battles of Ypres. 143 of them are the names of Dublin Fusiliers belonging to the 2nd Battalion who died on the 24th of May 1915.

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John O’Brien (1882 – XXXX)
5764, Private, 4th Battalion
City of Dublin Militia, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Because commonality of his name in Ireland, it is impossible to narrow him down, even using information from his service papers. 
It is possible to say only that John was born around 1882 in St.Mary’s parish in Dublin.
He became regular labourer and he lived in 9 Denmark Road, Dublin. On the 18th February 1902 at age 20 he put forward an application to become Militia soldier with the City of Dublin Militia – 4th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
Based on the medical examination John O’Brien was 5 feet and 3 ½ inches tall. He weight 112 lbs. His eyes were grey and hair dark brown. Obviously he was Roman Catholic.
He was attached to the battalion and already on the 10 March 1902 he embarked to the war in South Africa. He arrived to there on the 27th March 1902.
During this phase of the war a larger scale battles were over and units were manning blockhouses in order to restrict the movement of the Boer guerrillas. This phase of the war also saw the use of mounted infantry companies and among them was the Dublin Fusiliers Mounted Infantry unit, which hunted down small groups of Boers, including the hunt for the prominent Boer officer, Christian De Wet.
The conflict ended when the last of the Boers surrendered in May 1902 followed by the Treaty of Vereeniging.  During the war, volunteers from the three militia battalions of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers had been used to provide reinforcements for the two regular battalions fighting in South Africa. 
Private O’Brien served in South Africa until 3rd October 1902 when he embarked back home. For his service, he received Queen South Africa medal with the clasps “South Africa 1902”, “Orange Free State” and “Cape Colony”. Also he received South Africa war gratitude £5.
After the war John O’Brien worked for Mr. Johnston from 102 Capel Street, Dublin. 
But looks like John wanted to become a full time regular soldier. He volunteered for a service to the Royal Irish Fusiliers on the 2nd February. His employer gave a good reference and also militia papers are stating that his character was good. 

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James Gaffney (1868 – xxxx)
3251, Private, 5th (County of Dublin Militia) Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

James was born in Dublin c. 1868 in St. Paul’s parish in Dublin. He lived in 139 Kings Street.
James Gaffney enlisted on the 27th May 1895 into Royal Dublin Fusiliers 5th Battalion (County of Dublin Militia). He was at that time 27 years old. Medical examination sheet describes him 5 feet and 8 ¾ inches tall, brown hair and blue eyes. 
He attended following years for annual training and was sent to militia reserve 24 June 1898. He re-engaged for militia service again.
When the Boer war started, he was embarked to South Africa on the 5th December 1899. He arrived 14 February 1900 and served in there until 25th February 1902.
James was finally discharged 26th May 1903.
Unfortunately I haven’t had luck to locate any extra information about him.
On his papers there is a note that 1904 his address was 11 Healys Cottages, Francis Street, Dublin.

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J.Hoskins (xxxx – xxxx)
2888, Private, 4th (City of Dublin Militia) Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Unfortunately I haven’t found out much about him. His service papers didn't survive. Medal roll shows that he was invalided 1900. He was entitled only QSA with the clasps; “Relief of Ladysmith”, “Orange Free State”, “Tugela Heights” and “Cape Colony”.
Based on the clasps, it is possible to say that he was in South Africa at least December 1899 – February 1900 (Relief of Ladysmith and Tugela Heights). Because he was invalided, he was most likely evacuated before he became entitled KSA. 

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Thomas Baker (1865 - 10 April 1941)
3907, Private, 4th (City of Dublin Militia) Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Thomas was born circa 1865 in the Chapelizod parish in Dublin and also lived there. He was married and lived with his wife and children there. His wife’s name was Anne Traynor.

In 1896, at the age of 31, Thomas Baker enlisted in the 4th. Battalion, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. This was the old Dublin City Militia Battalion.

However, this was not the first time that Baker served with the army. As younger man he previously served as a full time soldier with the 18th. Royal Irish Regiment.

At the time of his joining the Dublin City miliita his papers show that he was 5ft.6 inches high, brown hair and blue eyes. Baker was a fine soldier, gaining good conduct pay and described as being a man of “good” character.

At the outbreak of the Boer War in 1899, Private Thomas Baker was called up for full time service with the regular military forces and was posted to the 2nd. Battalion the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
In his papers an interesting letter written on his behalf by his commanding officer, gives some insight into Bakers previous service with the 18th. Royal Irish Regiment in which he earned two good conduct badges and was a man of very good character on his discharge from the Royal Irish.

After his return from the Boer War in 1901, he continued to serve with the 4th. Bn. R.D.F. His day job was a farm labourer. He stayed with the 4th. Bn of the Dubs right up to 1912. By this time his family had grown, his wife is listed as living at the Bridge Inn Chapelizod and his children are named Anne, Ellen, Thomas, Joseph and John. It is likely that his wife may have worked in the bar at the Bridge Inn, though further research needs to be done here.

His attestation papers showing that for the Royal Irish Regiment he joined at Clonmel in 1884. His death certificate as an army pensioner was located in this record. It shows that he died on 10th. April 1941 at St. Kevin’s Hospital Dublin. His weekly pension at that time was 10 shillings.

Baker was not satisfied to remain on retired pay and he enlisted again in 1917 serving in the Great War for 2 years. (France) For his Great War service (Labour Corps) he received the War & Victory Medals.
His service records with the Royal Irish paint an interesting picture adding detail to this soldiers life. In the 1880’s he was admitted to hospital on a few occasions. Interestingly, on one such occasion he had been “accidentally stabbed by a comrade” He earned the 1854 India Medal with Hazara 1888 clasp while serving with the Royal Irish.

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Thomas Delaney (1896 – xxxx)
5614, Private, 3rd (Kildare Militia) Extra Reserve Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Thomas was born around 1896 as a son of Francis and Hannah Delaney’s from 29 Chapel Street, Leighlinbridge, Co. Carlow. It is a small town on the River Barrow in County Carlow. His father was Malthouse Labourer and mother was looking after the kids. 1901 Census shows that they had all together 5 girls and 5 son’s in the family. Thomas was second youngest by age.
But Thomas’ mother passed away around 1907-1911. On the 1911 Census, his father lives only with Thomas, one of the older sister and new sister Catherine, who must be born around 1907. Sadly father had been marked his marital status widower.  

Three years later when Thomas enlisted, his service papers are showing his Next-In-Kin address given still father Francis, Chapel Street, Leighlinbridge, County Carlow.

He describes himself as 18 years old farm labourer from Carlow when he enlisted on the 16th May 1914 into Royal Dublin Fusiliers 3rd Battalion Extra Reserve. Already on the 8th August 1914 he was mobilised and attached to the 2nd Battalion. He was sent to 2nd battalion on the 1st April 1915. At that time his new unit was in France. 

Based on his service papers, Private Delaney received gunshot wound to the head on the 26 May 1915. At that period Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion just experienced horrific gas attack to their position on the “Mouse Trap Farm” area. This farm was located half a mile north of Wieltje. It was first given the name 'Shell Trap Farm' by the British. On the 24 May 1915 morning at 02:45 German launched heavy bombardment, involved the greatest use of chlorine gas to date, this time delivered with shells. The German gas came "drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it." Being a mere 30 yards from the enemy trenches the rapid occupation of the farm by the quick-moving German infantry was little short of inevitable. By 9:30 p.m., out of battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion "retired" was one officer and twenty other ranks. 

The Royal Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The 2nd Battalion commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Loveband, C.M.G, died the following day. The battalion did not take part in any more major battles for the rest of the year. Engraved on the Menin Gate Memorial there are 143 names from Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion who died on the 24th of May 1915.

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Mouse Trap Farm, 1915

Private Delaney, after initial recovery, was sent back home on the 18th July 1915 where he was discharged on the 18 November 1915. 24th October 1915 Irish Times published a list of wounded soldiers and Private Delaney’s name appears in the section named “wounded and suffering gas poisoning”.

Thomas received King’s Certificate number 102/1519 for his service on the 16 June 1918. At that time he lived in Poe’s Hill road, Leighlinbridge.

Unfortunately Thomas health was seriously damaged. He passed away on the 16th November 1925. His name appears on the Leighlinbridge/Old Leighlin Great War memorial. When he died he was only 27 (29) years of age.

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Carlow Great War Memorial

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Denis Fitzpatrick (1882 – XXXX)
4619, Private, 5th Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Denis was born at St.Pauls parish in Dublin around 1882. His father was James Fitzpatrick, who lived at 1900 on 16 Bloom Street, Manchester.
When he enlisted for militia service Denis lived in 117 Francis Street, Dublin. His trade is recorded as cattleman.

He enlisted into 5th Battalion (County of Dublin Militia) on the 3rd January 1900. Already on the 14th February he was embarked to South Africa.

During his time in SA his unit had only minor engagements against the Boers but still they took some losses. Also diseases took its toll and as an extra, 5th Battalion had pretty bad luck with the summer thunderstorms when once a severe storm suddenly hit them when they were in the camp near Mafeking. One of the tent’s was hit by lightning, sheets of corrugated iron flew around and Colonel Gernon and Captain Baker together with many others, sustained very serious injuries.

Before end of their time in SA, battalion stationed in Warrenton area, Northern Cape province.

Denis was shipped back with the battalion to home on the25th February 1902 where the parade took place and the Duke of Connaught presented officers and men their medals. 

The 5th Battalion lost in total two officers and ten men killed, and eight wounded.

Denis became entitled set of two medals:

Queen South Africa Medal with the clasps “Transvaal”, “Orange Free State”, “Cape Colony”

King’s South Africa medal with the clasp “South Africa 1901”, “South Africa 1902”

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Your collection is a class its own.

I started collecting again from NIL medals this summer and I think can be proud what I have found so far.

George Thompson
11544, Private, 2nd Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

George was most likely born in County Wicklow. ICRC papers are referring his next-of-kin address Mrs.Thompson, Rathnew, Co.Wicklow.
Based on his service number, George enlisted to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2nd Battalion (nicknamed 'The Old Toughs') around summer 1913.
When the Great War started, he was one of the main patches, who were sent to France in the end of August, 1914. Private George Thompson landed in Boulogne at 23rd August 1914. His unit saw action almost immediately in Belgium and lost large amount of officers and men killed wounded or more “lucky ones” found themselves as Prisoners of War (POW). This all happened due to the hectic retreat from Mons and Le Cateau area in Belgium where Dublin Fusiliers objective was to provide a rear guard force that would cover the retreating British Expeditionary Forces.
George’s name appears on the 18th February 1915 Irish Times wounded list. He is mentioned again in the summer which indicates that his wounds weren’t too serious and he was back in his unit shortly afterwards. Most likely he was with his battalion when they experienced one of the most horrific events in the Great War – 24th May 1915 first poison gas attach at Ypres. At this time 2nd Battalion was in the area called “Shell Trap Farm” or like they start calling it later on “Mouse Trap Farm”. 24th May 1915 645 men were lost out of 666. This place was located half-a-mile North of Wieltje, originally a moated farm with outbuildings. It was first given the name 'Shell Trap Farm' by the British. The unhappy associations of this designation were held to be detrimental to the garrison's morale and the position was subsequently re-named by the Staff as 'Mouse Trap Farm'. On the morning of the attack on 24th May 1915 what was left of the farm after the bombardment ('a mere heap of mud and rubbish') was defended by two platoons of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers; being a mere 30 yards from the enemy trenches the rapid occupation of the farm by the quick-moving German infantry was little short of inevitable.
At 2:45 am on the 24th of May, the Germans launched a gas attack on the Allied lines which was the first time that the Germans had used poison gas on a large scale on the Western Front. The German poison gas came ‘drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it.’ By 9:30 pm, out of battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion ‘retired’ was one officer and twenty other ranks. For the record, in just eighteen and three quarter hours, the Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The British at that time had no defences against gas attack; indeed the large-scale use of gas by the Germans on the Western Front had begun at Second Ypres. The Battalion did not take part in any more major battles for the rest of the year.
Wounded private George Thompson was captured by Germans. He is first listed on the International Committee of Red Cross documents when his soldier’s pay book has been sent to the German records office as he is dead. This list has a stamp from 29th May 1915. Next record shows him as actually being at the field hospital Cologne (Feld Lazarett Köln) on 6th June 1915 and then being held at Siegburg prisoner’s camp, wounded left arm and thigh. In home, Irish Times recorded him as a “Missing” on the 23rd June 1915.
There was a period when wounded prisoners were exchanged using a “parole system”, whereby the British authorities undertake not to return the man to the field against Germans.  In those circumstances men were sent to garrison battalions that had no likelihood of facing German troops.
When George arrived back to Ireland, he was transferred to the Royal Irish Fusiliers Garrison Battalion on the 1st January 1917. His new service number was given G/19555.
After his full recovery, he was sent on to the Royal Field Artillery. New service number 268071.
His move to the Royal Field Artillery might reflect him becoming medically fit again and perhaps able to be sent to another theatre of war, such as Salonika, or Mesopotamia where again he would not be breaching the terms of his parole.


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Charles Toomey (1872 – XXXX)
5698, Private, 2nd Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Charles was born at Clonmurry, Kildare around 1872. He had two sisters Mary and Ester. Based on his medical examination description, he was 5 feet and 8 ¾ inches tall, 161 lbs. His eyes were grey and hair light brown. 
First served with the 3rd Battalion (Special Reserve) Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He enlisted at Naas 15th February 1896 for regular service. After initial training in the Naas depot, Private Toomey was posted to West Indies on the 5th October 1896. He was attached first to the 1st Battalion but soon after, on the 6th October he was transferred into 2nd Battalion. After a year service in India, he and his battalion left for Maritzburg, Natal, in 1897. During his service in South Africa, he was granted a good conduct pay on the 15th February 1898.

The political situation had become so threatening by July, 1899, that the military authorities began to take precautionary measures, and the battalion was ordered to effect a partial mobilisation and to collect its transport. On September 20th it moved by train to Ladysmith and four days later proceeded to Glencoe. The 2nd battalion stationed at Dundee, along with the 1st Leicestershire Regiment, 1st King's Royal Rifle Corps, 18th Hussars, and the 13th, 67th, and 69th Batteries RFA, under Major-General Sir William Penn Symons. 

The country was still nominally at peace, but the Dundee force held itself ready for emergencies, and sent out mounted patrols by day and infantry piquets by night, while the important railway junction at Glencoe was held by a company.  
First battle where Private Toomey found himself was  the Battle of Talana Hill, also known as the Battle of Glencoe. This was the first major clash of the Second Boer War. A frontal attack by British infantry supported by artillery drove Boers from a hilltop position, but the British suffered heavy casualties in the process, including their commanding general Sir William Penn Symons was mortally wounded.

Soon after, with the rest of the troops, the 2nd Battalion retreated to Ladysmith.  They were present in the action of Lombard's Kop on 30th October 1899 but were much split up, three companies acting as escort to artillery, one on outpost, etc.  They did not suffer many casualties.  On the same evening the battalion was "hurriedly entrained" and sent down the line to occupy Fort Wylie and protect the great bridge over the Tugela, but the advancing tide of Boer invasion soon lapped round them and they had to move still farther south.  Three sections were in the unfortunate armoured train which was derailed on 15th November 1899.
At Venter's Spruit on 20th January the 2nd Battalion and the three companies of the 1st Battalion were given under command of General Hart's force.
In the fourteen days' fighting between 13th and 27th February General Hart's men were at first near the rail-head, and were brought down to Colenso village on the 20th.  On the 23rd February order was received to attack the main Boer position.  A short account of this action is given under the Inniskilling Fusiliers, who led in the assault, but the Connaught Rangers and 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers also pushed in close and lost most severely.  During that attack a Colonel Sitwell was among the killed.

The regiment was still to take part in another memorable assault before the close of the relief operations, being transferred to the command of General Barton for the last great effort on the 27th February, when Barton attacked and carried the eastern portion of Pieter's Hill.  In addition to the Dublins his troops that day were the Royal Scots Fusiliers and the Royal Irish Fusiliers.  The assault reflected credit on every one taking part in it, and gained the praise of General Buller.  In the fourteen days' fighting the Royal Dublin Fusiliers losses were approximately 1 officer and 20 men killed, and 6 officers and over 100 men wounded.  Eight officers and 7 non-commissioned officers and men of the 2nd Battalion were mentioned in General Buller's despatch of 30th March 1900, 5 of the latter being recommended for the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

Among of the wounded was as well Private Charles Toomey, who received a gunshot wound to his chest on the 27th February 1900 at Pieter’s Hill. After initial recovery in South Africa, Charles was sent back in home on the 18th April 1900.

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2nd Bn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers storming Talana Hill

Due to his wounds, Private Charles Toomey was discharged from regular service at the 5th July 1901. Papers are showing that he experienced “Intercostal neuralgia” is caused by nerve compression in the abdominal area, which is the area by the ribcage.
For his service in South Africa, Charles Toomey received Queen South Africa medal with following clasps:

Talana - All troops under Lieut. General Sir.W.Penn Symon’s command on 20th Octber 1899 who were north of an east and west line drawn though Waschbank Station.

Relief of Ladysmith - All troops in Natal north of and including Estcourt between 15th December 1899 and 28th February 1900 both dates inclusive

Tugela Heights - All troops of the Natal Field Force exclusive of the Ladysmith garrison, employed in the operations north of an east and west line through Chieveley Station between the 14th and 27th February 1900 both dates inclusive

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and disk previously

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Patrick Moore (1875 - xxxx)
4855, Sergeant, 2nd Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Patrick was born in Wicklow circa 1875. He enlisted 1893 age 18 and after initial training in depot, served in East Indies and South Africa. Promoted Corporal 1898 and Sergeant December 1899. He served whole Boer war and was present in Talana. For his war service, he received Queens South Africa medal with 6 clasps and King's South Africa medal with two clasps.

Much more research must be done about this pair but I wanted to post it up first - nice Christmas present to myself;).

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Thomas Glynn (1882 – xxxx)
7169, Private, 1st Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Thomas was born 1882 in Rathwire, Mullingar, Westmeath. 
Attested for service with the Dublin Fusiliers on 12 June 1900 when he was 18 years old from Athlone. His trade was marked on his service papers as a labourer.
Based on the medical examination sheet, he was 5 feet and 7 5/8 inches tall. He weighd 120 lbs and he had grey eyes and brown hair. 

He was posted first into the Royal Dublin Fusiliers Depot on the 24th June. After initial training he was transferred into the 1st Battalion on the 14th April 1901. At that time his new unit was in war at South Africa.

The 1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers long continued to operate on the Natal-Transvaal border and on the lines of communication.  One hundred and fifty men of the battalion were in the column of Colonel E C Knox in the first quarter of 1901—one of those columns which swept through the Eastern Tran The Mounted Infantry of the Dublin Fusiliers was represented in the little garrison of Fort Itala, which made such a splendid defence when the place was attacked by Botha with an overwhelming force on 26th September 1901.  Major Chapman of the 1st Dublins, who commanded the garrison, received promotion.  Lieutenant Lefroy and several non-commissioned officers and men were also mentioned in despatches by Lord Kitchener at the time for great gallantry.
In the beginning of 1902 the 1st Battalion was moved west to Krugersdorp to relieve the 2nd Battalion.

After the war in South Africa was over, 1st Battalion was moved to Malta on the end of 1902. One of them was as well Thomas, who left from there on the 2nd November 1902 and staid in Malta until 26th February 1903. Four companies were moved to Crete, including the one where Private Glynn served. He staid in Crete until 3rd March 1904 when companies were joined once again in Malta. The whole battalion occupied St George's Barracks Pembroke at that time but moved to Floriana Barracks in September 1905. The Royal Dublin Fusiliers developed an association with the Floriana Football Club which adopted the Irish green and white checkered shirt as their club colours.
Thomas staid in there until Battalion was moved to Egypt. His service papers are showing that he was shipped to Egypt on the 6th November 1905 but most likely it took place on the 16th November instead on board the Assaye. This was routine for peace soldiering in Alexandria.

On the 5th April 1907, Field-Marshall H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught visited Alexandria andpresented new Colours to the 1st Battalion.
On the 17th June 1907 Private Glynn’s active service was almost in the end and he was sent back home to Army Reserve on the 18th June 1907.
Towards the end of September 1907 orders were received for Headquarters and “A”, “C”, “F” and “H” companies were sent to Khartoum, the Sudan.

In the meantime Thomas staid in the reserve until 11 June 1912 when he was discharged from service.

For his service, Private Thomas Glynn was awarded Queen’s South Africa medal with three bars: Transvaal, SA 1901, SA 1902

Medal has interesting whole ribbon long metal plate with two loops for wear. So, obviously Private Glynn wore his medal with bride.

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Daniel Maher
15109, Private, 2nd Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

It is impossible to find out where Daniel was from because his name was too common at this period of time (and still is). There were records of 86 Daniel Maher’s in the 1911 Irish Census. When we are looking their age then around 28 of them were in the age to serve during the Great War.
Daniel enlisted end of September 1914 into the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. After initial training with one of the Reserve Battalion he was sent on the 3rd May 1915 as reinforcement into 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
At this time his unit was holding a line in very dangerous place. Just 21 days after his arrival most likely Private Daniel Maher was involved one of the most horrific events in the Great War – 24th May 1915 first poison gas attach at Ypres. At this time 2nd Battalion was in the area called “Shell Trap Farm” or like they start calling it later on “Mouse Trap Farm”.
 At 2:45 am on the 24th of May, the Germans launched a gas attack on the Allied lines which was the first time that the Germans had used poison gas on a large scale on the Western Front. The German poison gas came ‘drifting down wind in a solid bank some three miles in length and forty feet in depth, bleaching the grass, blighting the trees and leaving a broad scar of destruction behind it.’ By 9:30 pm, out of battalion strength of 666 men, all that remained when the battalion ‘retired’ was one officer and twenty other ranks. For the record, in just eighteen and three quarter hours, the Dublin Fusiliers had suffered a loss of 645 men who were blown to bits, gassed, or driven insane by the effects of poisonous gas. The British at that time had no defences against gas attack.
On the 24th October 1915 Irish Times his name appears on the list of soldiers who suffered gas poisoning. Most likely due to that he was discharged already same year on the 21st December 1915.
Daniel Maher was entitled:
-    1914/15 Star
-    British War Medal

-    Victory Medal

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Arthur Wilkins (20 December 1895 – Spring 1971)
14091, Private, 7th and 6th Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Arthur Wilkins was born at the 20 December 1895 in Marylebone, London.
When the Great War started, he enlisted on the 4th September 1914 into Royal Dublin Fusiliers. On his service papers his trade is marked as a “metal worker mate”. Medical sheet describes him as a 5 feet and 5 inches tall, weight 126 lbs and eyes blue and brown hair.
Private Wilkins was attached to the unit depot straightway. On the 18th September, he was transferred into 7th Battalion. 
Private Wilkins landed in Gallipoli on the 9 August 1915.
Private Wilkins received gunshot wound to the right thigh and wrist on the 17 August 1915. Arthur was first evacuated to Alexandria and then on board H/S “Asturias” to UK. 
He arrived back home at 26 September 1915
25 September 1915 posted to regimental depot. 
27 October 1915 posted to 3rd reserve battalion.
15 March 1916 attached to the 6th battalion that stationed in Balkans at this time.  He joined battalion on the 6 April 1916 in Azrameri. 
On September 1917 6th Battalion was moved to Egypt for service in Palestine.
On the 27 April 1918 they left the Division. On 3 July unit sailed from Alexandria, arriving Taranto five days later and then moving by train to France.
Following 21 July 1918 they were transferred to 197th Brigade in 66th (2nd East Lancashire) Division.
On the 29 February 1919 Arthur military service start became to the end and he was sent back to regimental depot. Following month, on the 28 March 1919 Private Wilkins was sent to Army Reserve Class B.
He was Mentioned in Despatches (MID) on London gazette at the 9 July 1919 for his service in France.
1921 Arthur married with Eva B Keech.
Medal entitlement:
-    1914-15 Star
-    British War Medal
-    Victory Medal with Mentioned in Despatches (MID) oak leaf device

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Edward Walter Ekins
28873, Private, 7th Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Because Edward had almost unique name, then it was possible to narrow him down on the GB Census, calculating age +/- 20 in 1880 (service age during the Great War). There were two Edward W Ekins; one of them had middle name Ward and another middle name was Walter. Edward Ward from Surrey served with the Royal Artillery and was killed in action 1917. Therefore I can be sure that the owner of the medals was Edward Walter Ekins.
Edward was born 1881 as a son of Walter Edward and Sarah Ekins in Blunham, Hertfordshire. 1911 Census shows that he was Servant Groom. He lived with his parents, 3 brothers and 2 sisters. His brother Jack was KIA in 1918 while serving with the Army Service Corps.
Ten years later he married with Violet Elizabeth Mayers at age of 30 in 1911. At this time he resided in Welwyn village in Hertfordshire.  
At some point Edward joined to the Special Constabulary as a part-time volunteer Special Constable. Most likely under the combination of Great War service and regular long service criteria he became entitled a Special Constabulary medal. The medal may be awarded to Special Constables who were recommended by the Chief Officer of Police of the department in which they served for at least nine years and the war period was counted triple. This medal was instituted 30th August 1919 and shows his good conduct and that he returned back to England after the war. 
After the start of the Great War, Edward enlisted around February 1916. Most likely he was one of the many, who fell under the Military Service Act, which was introduced on 27th January 1916 by government after the Derby scheme was failed. All voluntary enlistment was stopped. All British males were now deemed to have enlisted on 2nd March 1916 and from 25th May onwards, all married men were included as well. Also conscripted men were no longer given a choice of which regiment they joined. That may explain as well how he ended up in the Irish unit, like many English men did after 1916. 
After initial training he was attached to the 7th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. It is impossible to determinate when this move took place. Similar patch of soldiers, with “close enough” service numbers, were transferred actually from the Royal Fusiliers formation. There is a possibly that as well Private Ekins received his initial training with them before the transfer to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.  
At this time, 1916-1917 7th Battalion served in Salonika and from September 1917 in Palestine as a part of 10th (Irish) Division.
They were sent back to France on the 27th April 1918 from Alexandria, arriving Taranto five days later and then moving by train to France. They arrived to Marseilles on the 1st June 1918, where they were reduced to cadre on the 6th June 1918. Troops went to 2nd battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Probably at this time Private Edward W Ekins was transferred over to the 2nd Battalion as well. 
His new unit were transferred as Army Troops to Lines of Communication on the 16th June. A month later, on the 15th July 1918 they were transferred to 149th Brigade in 50th (Northumbrian) Division.
Private Ekins wasn’t released to the reserve after the armistice was signed with Germany in a railroad carriage at Compiègne at 11th November 1918. Instead he was mentioned in the commander of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig submission of names at 16th March 1919, whose deserve a special mention (Mentioned in Despatches). His name was published in the London Gazette at 9th July 1919.
In total, he was awarded:
-    British War Medal
-    Victory Medal with Mentioned in Despatches (MID) oak leaf device
-    Special Constabulary Medal (with the Great War clasp?)
Edward died in Bedford on the 26th October 1965. He left £1941 to his wife, Violet Elizabeth Ekins.

PS: BWM is replacement

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William Henry Aubin Croker (1852 – 17 June 1935)
Captain (Honourably Major), 4th Battalion City of Dublin Militia
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

William Henry was born Beaufield, Moyacomb, Co.Wexford 1852. He was the oldest son of Henry Braddell Croker, a Captain of 57th Regiment (West Middlesex). The Croker’s are an Anglo-Irish landed gentry family. The best known branch of them was centred at Ballynagarde in County Limerick. Another branch provided Rt Hon John Wilson Croker sometime MP and secretary to the Admiralty. The name Croker is a variation of Crokker, Crocker or Crock and derives from the old English for potter. There were Crocks and Crockers in Ireland in medieval times. 

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William was probably sent over to England in early age. Most likely he was educated there in some boarding schools in Worcester area. After his school years he was commissioned as Gentlemen to be Second Lieutenant in the Worcester Militia 3rd and 4th battalion. This was announced on the London Gazette 14th September 1877. Also 1878 Army list records him active in the same area Militia.

Following year was important for him because William Henry married at Holy Trinity Church, Paddington on 25th June 1879 with Frances Augustine Pinon du Clos de Valmer. She was eldest daughter of the Viscomte Pinon du Clos de Valmer.

His military career went smoothly and already 13th September 1879 he was promoted to the rank Lieutenant. Next promotion followed 27 June 1883, when he received a rank Captain. At this time he served with the 4th Battalion Worcester Militia.

Some moment he moved back with his family to Ireland and settled in County Wexford. 

His name appears in many Irish Petty Sessions Court Registers over period of 1881 – 1896 and also 1903. Most of these cases were related to the property and usage of the Beaufield land, where Croker’s family resided. As an example, in one instance he sued a man who took four dead rabbits from his land.

Also William must be into the horses and horse racing because August 1890 an Irish Times lists his name and his horse “Umrigar” as a participant in the competition.
When the war in South Africa broke out, William Henry commissioned again. This time he started his service with the 4th battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, to where he was assigned as a Captain, announcement was published in the 22nd May 1900 in London Gazette.

During his service in South Africa, he contracted some kind of disease and 5th July 1902 Irish Times shows his name on the dangerously ill officer’s list. 2 weeks later his name appears again but in this time there is a note about his condition and it says “improving”.

After his service Captain Croker was entitled a Queen’s South Africa medal with the clasps “South Africa 1901”, “South Africa 1902”, Transvaal , Orange Free State , Cape Colony . Medal roll confirms that during his service in the war, he was attached to the Remount Depot. The Remount Department was set up in order to ensure the uniformity and suitability of the animals purchased for the army, and their training. During the Boer War 326,000 horses and 51,000 mules were lost, mainly through disease, so the animal establishment was increased after that.

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On the 21 December 1907 Captain William Henry Aubin Croker retired. Therefore he was granted a rank Honorary Major with the permission to wear the prescribed uniform. 

In the 1911 Irish census shows him and his wife living in Beaufield, Moyacomb, co.Wexford. They had two domestic servants. No children are showen.

On the 8th June 1912 unfortunately William’s wife passed away.
During the Great War William didn’t serve. In the 1916 an Irish Times has an advertisement with his name and it’s confirmed his address on Beaufield Mansion again.
 
William Henry Aubin Croker died in his home 17th June 1935. His death was announced in Irish Times 19th June and he was buried on the 20th June next to his wife.

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Edited by Noor

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Good Morning Timo......

Welcome back and a fantastic collection.....

Mike

 

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Thanks guys. A little pit more...

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William Charles Nesbitt (1875 – 16.08.1915)
2nd Lieutenant,  6th (Service) Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

William was born around 1875 as a only son of late Mr. William Nesbitt and Jane Nesbitt of Dove House, Blackrock, Co.Dublin. His mother was originally from County Sligo.
William was educated at Blackrock College. 1899 he married with Mary Nesbitt (née Farrell) from Dublin. At that time they lived in 8 Crosthwaite park, South, Kingstown, Co.Dublin.
1901 he worked as a Assistant Cashier of the Alliance Gas Company. By 1911 he was promoted to the  Chief Cashier position that he held until the beginning of the Great War.
He was nationalist, and at the election he headed the list in his native ward. He was member of the board of Finance, Works Library and Technical Committee of the Blackrock Council. He was also a member of the South Dublin Catholic Insurance Society and of the St.Vincent de Paul Society. As a sportsman he was known on the Malahide Strand and the Wicklow Mountains, and as bowler, he was champion of the Blackrock Club.
When the Great War broke out, new service battalions were immidleatly formed next to the existing units. Royal Dublin Fusiliers 6th (Service) Battalion was formed at Naas in August 1914 as part of K1 and attached to 30th Brigade in 10th (Irish) Division.
One of the early volunteers was as well William Charles Nesbitt. He obtained his commission on 14th December 1914 and served as a 2nd Lieutenant in the battalion.
They trained on the Curragh before moving to the Royal, now Collins Barracks, Dublin. Further training took place in the Phoenix Park and on the firing range at Bull Island before the Division moved to Basingstoke in Hampshire in May 1915 for final preparations. On the 10 July 1915 7am 6th Battalion embarked on the “Alaunia” at Devonport and sailed to Gallipoli via Mytilene. 
On the 7 August 1915 their unit Landed at Suvla Bay . Remainder of that day and the next, the men undertook fatigues carrying water and ammunition, attached first to 31st Brigade on water & ammunition fatigues, then attached to 33rd Brigade on 9th August. Before that a battalion lost nearly 40 soldiers killed, however; most probably by enemy shellfire.
At the front 2nd Lieutenant Nesbitt was recommended by his colonel for great gallantry on the 9th August.
Lieutenant Nesbitt took part three or four actions and like newspaper said, he won honours by his brave conduct under fire. Most likely he was commander of “A” Company. His unit camptured portion of a ridge. It was found to be untenable and they were ordered to retire. In the meantime in the dawn of 16th August, strongly reinforced enemy,started with counter attacks. The nature of the intervening ground was such as to make rifle fire impossible. The two armies were almost locked together. Soldiers tried by lifting their rifles over the crest of the intervening hillocks to discharge them at random, but without result. The best weapon were hand grenades.
Lieutenant Nesbitt was colleeting his men to prepeare to retrite when he was shot in the side. As he fell his men ran to help him and raised him up. At the same instant he was stuck a second time and killed on site.
From that day Royal Dublin Fusiliers 6th Battalion War Diary states – 16/08/1915 – “B”, “C” and “D” Coy take up position on “Spion Kop”. Officer killed 2/lieut Nesbitt. Officers wounded 2/lieut Healy and Maloney. Killed, wounded and missing 17.
2nd Lieutenant Willaim Charles Nesbitt was killed on Monday, August 16 when he was 40 years old. He is commemorated in Helles Memorial, panel 190 to 196.
His death was a sad news for a whole Kingstown and Blackrock community. During a special meeting in Blackrock Urban Council it was suggested to raise a memorial tablet for him in the town city hall. Unfortunately I haven’t been able to locate his name on any war memorial on the Blackrock or Dun Laoghaire (Kingstown) area now.

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Here is one rare medal to the 3rd Extra Reserve Battalion. What I like the most is his service number - 266. Haven't seen anything that low before to the Dubs! Unfortunately he had way too common name to narrow him down any further. 

Thomas Doyle (1867 – 1900)
266, Private, 3rd (Reserve) Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Thomas was born circa 1867 and he lived Athy, County Kildare. He enlisted 1885 into 3rd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers as a reserve militia soldier. Based on his service papers he was single and his trade was marked as a Labourer (Bricklayer) at that time.

He attested and completed immediately 56 days initial soldier’s training 8th October 1885 – 2nd December 1885. He continued to receive annual trainings each year and based on his service file looks like he was active.
When the South Africa war started, he was one of the extra reserve soldiers who were sent to there. He took part Relief of Ladysmith operations 15th December 1899 until 28th February 1900. Also he was present in Tugela Heights, where the troops were employed in the operations north of an east and west line through Chieveley Station between the 14th and 27th February 1900.

But during the war in South Africa, Private Doyle was invalided in September 1900 and shortly afterwards he died 4th November 1900.

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Kenneth Charles Weldon (25.04.1877 – 11.04.1958)
Lieutenant-Colonel
1st and 2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Kenneth Charles Weldon was born on 25 April 1877.1 He was the son of Rev. Cannon at Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin; Lewen Burton Weldon and Olivia Maria Barrington. He graduated in 1899 with a St Edward's School, Oxford and Trinity College, Dublin Bachelor of Arts (B.A.).

He commissioned to the rank of 2nd Lieutenant on the 17th February 1900 and was posted to the 2nd Battalion. At that time Boer war was on-going and he was sent to there.
He must approved himself there as a promising officer because already on the 28th May 1902 he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant.
He married Elizabeth Constance Jane Croker, daughter of Major William Croker, on 14 November 1906.

He was promoted again to the rank Captain on the 22nd January 1909.
1911 he was “C” Company commander, 2nd Battalion.

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From 1912 onwards he served as an Adjutant of the 4th (Dublin City Militia) Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He stayed in this position until 1915,
Early 1916 he was transferred to France where he landed on 17th February as a part of 16th Irish Division.

In there he was attached to the 7th Royal Irish Fusiliers as a Major and battalion commanding officer.

In the Westen Front Major Weldon distinguished himself and got mentioned in Despatches and French Legion of Honour order.  On 1st January 1917 London Gazette announced Distinguished Service Order for him as a part of New Year's Honour. The warrant for his DSO was sent to him on 24 March 1917 and he was invested by the King at Buckingham Palace on 24 January 1917.

13th April 1918 Lieutenant Colonel took command of 1st and 2nd composite battalion of Royal Dublin Fusiliers. 
After the war he stayed in Royal Dublin Fusiliers and was in 1st Battalion. 1921 he took part of shooting competition as a part of regiment team and won this medal. 

In 2nd August 1922, after the Royal Dublin Fusiliers was disbanded, Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth Charles Weldon was transferred into 1st Battalion Sherwood Foresters.

Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth Charles Weldon, DSO retired from active service on the 14th July 1928.

He settled in England and died on 11 April 1958 at age 80 at Moreton, Dorset. On his grave there are Crests of Royal Dublin Fusiliers and Sherwood Foreresters.

Shooting award:

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Edited by Noor

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Charles Cushing (1872 – xxxx)
3725, Private, 1st Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Charles was born in New Lakenham, Norwich, Norfolk around 1872. When he enlisted, his trade was marked as a labourer.

Charles enlisted on the 25th July 1890 when he was 18,5 years old. But his papers reveal that prior to that he was listed with the 3rd Reserve Battalion of Norfolk Regiment.

He arrived to Naas Royal Dublin Fusiliers Depot on July 1890 to receive initial soldier’s training. Next Private Cushing was posted to the 1st Battalion on the 2nd October 1890. Subsequently he left to East Indies on the 15th November 1892 and was transferred into the 2nd Battalion.
During his station in India, his service must go smoothly and he was granted 1st good Conduct Pay 9th November 1894. Based on the Army Order from 8th March, 1895, he was in the “H” Company. At that time they were stationed in Quetta.

Next he was appointed (with pay) to the rank of Lance Corporal on 6th May 1896 and at the same year on 9th November 1896 Charles received 2nd Good Conduct Pay. 
Following year his service in East Indies was finished and on the 17th May 1897 he and his unit sailed to South Africa, where he stayed until 3rd March 1898. After his active service with the colours he was transferred into Army reserve on the 6th March 1898.

He arrived back home and start settling in to civilian life when Boer War broke out. Charles was recalled to Army Service under Special Army Order of October 1899. Immediately he was posted to 1st Battalion on the 9th October 1899. He arrived back to South Africa on the 10th November 1899.

He took part Relief of Ladysmith operations in Natal between 15th December 1899 and 28th February 1900. Also he served in the Transvaal 24th May 1900 until 31st May 1902 but he wasn’t involved in any specific action in there. For his service Charles Cushing received Queen South Africa medal with the clasps “Relief of Ladysmith” and “Transvaal”. Also he got King’s South Africa medal with the clasps “South Africa 1901” and “South Africa 1902”.

Charles was finally discharged from 1st September 1902. During his service, his Next-in-Kind – mother Harriet Cushing, 60 Cherry Street, New Lakenham, Norwich. 

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William Thomas Bedford (09.05.1881 – 1945)
6518, Private, 1st Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

William Thomas was born in Derby on the 9th May 1881. His parent(s) must be Irish emigrants because based on service papers his religion was marked as Roman Catholic and also he started his military career in the fine Irish regiment – the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
He enlisted on the 1st October 1895 only 14 years of age as a boy soldier. He was at that time only 4 feet and 9 ½ inches tall.
His service started in the 1st Battalion in India. He was sent to there from Portsmouth on the 2nd October 1895. Due to his age, William was in the beginning a boy-drummer. During that time in India he received his first Good Conduct badge on the 1st October 1897. Drummer Bedford and his unit were sent to South Africa on the 9th November 1899.

After arriving to there, they operate on the Natal-Transvaal border and on the lines of communication. 
During that time William saw action and he received Queen South Africa medal with the following clasps; “Relief of Ladysmith”, “Orange Free State”, “Laing’s Nek”, “Transvaal”. Also he got King’s South Africa medal with two clasps “South Africa 1901” and “South Africa 1902”.
For his service, also Drummer Bedford was granted a Good Conduct pay on the 1st October 1901.

During his service in South Africa, on the 15th January 1903 William was transferred into Army Service Corps. Due to that, when the Royal Dublin Fusiliers units left from there, Private William Thomas Bedford continued his service in South Africa.
First he was a Clerk in the office in Natal District at Pietermaritzburg from January to September 1903 and then he moved on as a supply office at Krugersdorp from September 1903 until April 1904.
In some reason William went absent from service from 26th March 1904 until 9th April 1904. For that he received punishment of 10 days C.B., forfeited 1st GC badge and 15 days service.

In August 1904 he left from South Africa and served then in England.
Following year his Good Conduct badge was restored on the 10th April 1905 and two years later, he re-engaged into service, in order to complete 21 years of service. Also he became qualified typist from the 1st November 1906.
He was appointed to the rank Lance Corporal on the 15th July 1908 and worked in the General Staff GO Command in Tidworth, Wiltshire. 

Then he was moved back to South Africa, where he arrived on the 13th January 1910. During that stay in the country time he also married with Annie Quinlan Spinster on the 20th November 1910.
He worked mainly in Potchefstroom as a Supply Officer. From October 1913 onwards he was appointed to the R.T.O Office (Regional Transport Office) and 1914 he was in Pretoria, Central registration S.A. 
On the 16th July 1914 he was promoted to the rank Corporal. Less than a month later he became Sergeant on the 5th August 1914.
Once again he was shipped back to home on the 14th November 1914 and stayed there until March 1915. From 20th March onwards he was sent to Egypt and served there until the end of the war. After arrival, William became Acting Staff Sergeant without pay from 27th May 1915 and from 13th July with the pay. Following that, he became Squadron Serjeant-Major on the 2nd May 1917.
By the end of the war, in February 1918 he was promoted to the rank Staff Sergeant.

Hi service ended on the 15th July 1919 when he was discharged after 23 years and 288 days of service. After that he was sent back home from. But before that he first at all received bounty of £25 in February 1918. On the 3rd June 1919 he received Meritorious Service Medal for service in Egypt and also he got Long Service & Good Conduct Medal.

In total Staff Sergeant William Thomas Bedford was entitled to:
-    Queen South Africa Medal
-    King’s South Africa Medal
-    1915 Star
-    British War Medal
-    Victory Medal
-    Meritorious Service Medal
-    Long Service & Good Conduct Medal

(if any of you spot his other medals, please let me know. I know his MSM and LS&GC medals are around somewhere. They were sold 2010 in DNW auction and buyer moved them on some moment)

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Patrick Babester (16.01.1886 – 23.06.1972)
8958, Private, 2nd Battalion
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Patrick was born in Dublin on the 16th January 1886 as a son of Richard Joseph Babester and Mary Jane Babester (née Lenehan). At that time they lived 66 Church Street (tragedy took place there at the 2nd September 1913 when two houses, including number 66 collapsed and killed many residents). 
His family living conditions were poor because Patrick’s name appears on the Dublin Workhouses Admission & Discharge Registers from very young age. Workhouses in Ireland were established under the Act for the Effectual Relief of the Destitute Poor in Ireland, which was passed in 1838. The North and South Dublin Workhouses provided more than just refuge for the absolute destitute of the city.
When he got older, he was sent to Saint Anne's Ward Belfast. Based on 1901 Census he is listed there as a 15 years old pupil.
After his time in Belfast, Patrick joined 2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers for regular 7 years of service and 5 years of Army Reserve. On the 1907 he became a father of Pauline Annie Babester (Babister) (1907-1979). 1908 Patrick lived on 7 Magers Court (Charlotte Street) in Dublin. He got married with Rose Hutchinson on the 09 January 1908. Sadly this marriage didn’t last long – Rose Babester died same year when she was only age 21.
Few years after discharge, 1911 Irish Census shows that Patrick was unemployed general labourer and at that time he stayed with his sister Mary Dolan’s home in 36 Newmarket, Merchants Quay. Following year 1912 electoral roll shows that Patrick still lived in the same address in his sister’s house. 

When the Great War started, Patrick was mobilized from reserve and he was one of the first Royal Dublin Fusiliers soldiers who were sent overseas with his unit – 'The Old Toughs' 2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
Private Babester landed in Boulogne at 23rd August 1914. His unit saw action almost immediately in Belgium and lost large amount of officers and men killed, wounded or more “lucky ones” found themselves as Prisoners of War (POW). All of this happened due to the hectic retreat from Mons and Le Cateau area in Belgium where Dublin Fusiliers objective was to provide a rear guard force that would cover the retreating British Expeditionary Forces.
Among of the soldiers who were captured by Germans was as well Private Patrick Babester who became POW on the 28th August. Over the Christmas period, his Christmas box was sent to his new home address in Dublin - 21 Chambers Street. Also his name was published on the Irish Times Prisoner of War list at 23rd April 1915.
Those who were captured were mainly put into a prisoner of war camp at Limburg. It was the camp that Roger Casement went in to try and recruit an Irish brigade. Casement misjudged these Irishmen’s loyalty to each other. They had come through hell and were not going to betray their fellow soldiers with whom they had fought and died.
A dispatch from the German War Office in March 1915 gave details of a rule for all Prisoner of War Camps. Prisoners were not allowed to write more than two letters a month, not exceeding four pages, and six pages of ordinary size in the case of officers and soldiers respectively. In addition, one postcard a week was allowed. 
The causes of death among POWs vary from camp to camp and vary throughout the war. Flu caused quite a few deaths as did fleck or spotted typhus, especially in Wittenberg. TB became a problem at Limburg and it will have caused significant casualties though many would be after the war. In tented camps in 1914-15 there were a significant number of deaths caused by the poor conditions which were far worse than those described in Limburg. A small number died through accidents and some were shot. Many also died as a result of lack of care and medical attention. 
It proved difficult for the Germans to provide a prisoner of war with everything they needed for a reasonable existence. As the war progressed the Royal Dublin Fusiliers Prisoners of War Committee became more and more important who organised special supplies to POWs. 
When the Great War ended and Patrick was released from captivity and he turned back to civil life. He served all together 10 years and 6 months. Out of that time4 years and 3 months he was POW. 

After active service he went to work in Guinness brewery at 26th May 1919. At that time he was 33 years of age. He worked there as an Electrician's Helper (Employee ID 15881). Guinness’s brewery was active in looking after employees who joined the colours. Even every enlisted worker received half pay while serving. Company re-employed all the returning servicemen and also widows (37) were treated generously. Nevertheless the company not only took back former employees but recruited another 694 ex-servicemen, 259 of them on a temporary basis and some suffering from disabilities.
The Engineers’ Department was one of the largest departments in the St.James’s Gate Brewery. The Engineers’ Department was responsible for all building construction and maintenance as well as mechanical and electrical engineering projects in the Brewery. The Engineer’s Department supervised the construction of all Brewery buildings and brewing machinery. By the 1960s, there were over 1100 people employed in the Engineers’ Department, including skilled craftsmen such as boilermakers, patternmakers, carpenters, painters, scaffolders, bricklayers, plumbers, blacksmiths and coppersmiths as well as professionals such as architects and engineers.

Patrick most likely married again with Ellen Babester (died in Ireland 1957). They lived 120 Lismore Road, Terenue/Kimmage.
Patrick retired from the Guinness on the 16th January 1951.
Most likely after his wife passed away Patrick immigrated to UK and settled in Salford, Lancashire. At the moment I am not able to confirm it yet but most likely he had two children – Francis (Frank) Patrick Babester (1933 – 2005) and Anthony Francis Babester (1931-1994). His address there was probably 16 Rigby Street, Salford, Lancashire.
Patrick Babester died on the 23rd June 1972 in Salford, Lancashire. 

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one set of medals that find way back into my collection - I am very pleased because I really enjoyed doing that research!

 

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Henry Murray “Chippi” Letchworth, M.A.
(6th February 1889 - December 1964)
Captain, Commander of “Y” Company
1st Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Henry Murray Letchworth was born in 6th February 1889 at Exton which is small village in Hampshire, England, he had a twin brother Arthur Gordon Letchworth and older brother George Howard Letchworth.

His twin brother Arthur served with the Royal Munster Fusiliers and after the war worked as a clerk with the Health Ministry (he died in 1933).

In his early years Henry lived with his aunt at Newlyn, Adelaide Road, Kingston, Surbiton where he was recorded in the 1891 and 1901 census.

In his teenage years Henry entered the Haileybury and Imperial Service College, which is known as a prestigious British independent school, near Hertford (32 km from central London).
1907 he matriculated to the Oriel College, Oxford, where he studied Theology, Henry was also member of the Officer Training Corps which he left in October 1910.
In 22nd July 1911 he got a 3rd class Honors Degree, 4 years later, on the 3rd April 1915 he achieved a Master’s Degree.
At the same Henry started working as an Assistant Master on the Beechmont Preparatory School, Sevenoaks and he lived at 3 Ethelbert Road, Canterbury, Kent.

When the Great War broke out, Henry responded to the King’s call and put his application forward on the 22nd March 1915 to become an officer in the British Army, his candidature was accepted and he was appointed a commission in the Special Reserve of Officers with the 4th Royal Dublin Fusiliers in the rank of 2nd Lieutenant.
On the 20th of December 1915 the London Gazette supplement confirmed that 2nd Lieutenant Henry M. Letchworth has attested to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

During his time in Ireland, he was stationed with the 4th battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Templemore Barracks.
Ironically Henry got his first combat experience here, when the 4th Battalion was sent to Dublin during the Easter Rising 24–30 April 1916 where they also suffered casualties, a detachment of 4th Battalion is also reported as being in Dublin Castle.

In July 1916, 2nd Lieutenant Letchworth was attached to the 8th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, at this time this unit fought on the Western Front as a part of 48th Brigade of the 16th (Irish) Division. Their hardest challenge took place on the fields of France and Belgium – the 1916 Somme offensive.

Henry was sent back to England on the 7th of September 1916 from Le Havre on the HMMS Panama and he arrived back to Southampton on the 14th September 1916. Due to his health condition, the medical board of the 2nd Southern General Hospital in Bristol granted him a leave from 18th September to 17th October.

Henry joined the 4th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers again on the 26th October 1916, at this time they were based in Mullingar.

The following year on the 1st of July 1917 Henry was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant (25.10.1917 London Gazette).

At this time, he was attached to the 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, which arrived back from their service in the Balkans the previous year. Most likely this move took place during the reorganisations in October 1917, when the battalion was transferred to the 48th Brigade 16th (Irish) Division or earlier. Unfortunately it is impossible to trace that transfer.   

Henry must have proved himself as a valuable front line officer as from the 15th of February 1918 Henry was appointed to the rank of Acting Captain (19.04.1918 London Gazette), but things took a very different turn on the 21st March 1918.

The previous year the German High Command had decided to make a decisive attack in the west in the following spring and their target was the British Army in the Somme area. The Germans plan was to destroy British units before American forces could build up their strength. The New offensive was called the "Kaiserschlacht" (Kaiser's Battle) or known now as the “Spring Offensive”.

The Germans planned to use their new tactics, which they practised on the Russian front – intense artillery barrage against key points such as machine-gun posts, headquarters, railways, telephone lines, etc. Attacks would be carried out by small well trained groups - stormtroopers, whose main aim was to move forward through gaps in the front and try to surround the main frontline troops.

The attack started with the artillery bombardment at 4.40 am on 21 March. The bombardment targeted an area of 150 square miles, the biggest barrage of the entire war. Over 1,100,000 shells were fired in five hours.

In the end, over 320 soldiers from Royal Dublin Fusiliers were killed in this battle and many of them were taken prisoners. I have the privilege to have a copy of Acting Captain Henry Murray Letchworth’s own report of what happened on that day. He was 1st Battalion, Y Company commander at this time. He wrote the following statement on the 16th of January 1919:

I was in command of Y Company, which had 2 platoons in the front line and 2 in support at C.H.Q. At 4.30 am 21.3.18 the enemy started a very heavy barrage of gas and H.E. which continued until 10.30 am. Platoon commanders got fair cover for their platoons, but we lost around ¼ of our strength during the bombardment. At 7 am I visited the platoons, the fog was then very thick and continued so all the morning. All communications with B.H.Q. except by runners, was broken.
Enemy first attacked about 10.30 am and got into the front line, but we drove them out again with the aid of one of the reserve platoons by 11.30. Informed B.H.Q. 11.40 and got a reply to hold on. Had conference with O.C. X a Z coys about noon. At 12.30 pm saw the enemy in trenches on our sight, and at 1 pm they were firing from LEMPIRE. Suffered very heavy casualties from their machine gun fire. A second attack started at 2 pm., in which remains of coy were driven back around C.H.Q. all platoon commanders were casualties. Only 30 men were left. Sent off last a message to B.H.Q. at 2.30 pm, after that time the enemy were in our rear, and our own guns were firing on us. The Enemy’s third attack took place about 3.45 pm. I was captured with Capt.J.Kee (X Coy, which was on my left) who was very badly wounded in the thigh, at about 4.15 pm.

Captain Letchworth became one of the 4 officers and 290 men missing after the attacks. He was captured near Epehy and Lempire.
The Book “Bluecaps” also indicates what he said in his last message which he sent off at 2.30pm to the Battalion Headquarters: 

Reports from the wounded made it clear that the men in the front line were very hard pressed, but at the same moment a very noble message came from Acting  Capt Letchworth, commanding Y Coy that "he was surrounded but would hold on to the end”.

Regarding the moment when he was captured, I was able to find out who was the wounded Captain, sadly this man never made it back to Ireland:

William Kee, Acting Captain, MC, from Meenagrove, Co.Donegal. Officially he served in the 7th Battalion but after commission in 1915 rose the ranks to be Acting Captain and was attached to the 1st Battalion. He was brave man indeed, Mentioned in Despatches twice and Military Cross ( bar posthumously 16th September 1918) for his valour in Somme, he died three days later in Germans hands on the 24th March 1918.

Captain Letchworth had the fortune (good or bad is a matter of opinion in those “days of death”) to be taken prisoner of war by the German forces and he was first sent to Karlsruhe officers prison camp (Karlsruhe¬Offiziere Camp) in Baden. 
Officers were held in camps reserved only for them. There were living conditions less harsh then the regular soldier’s camps. They had beds, separate rooms for their meals and they were able to be involved in study or sport. 
After his capture, his next of kin address to the Germans was recorded as; Reverend Canon. H.H. Letchworth, 3 Ethelberth Road, Canterbury.
Also during his time as a POW, he became a life-long friend with the Lieutenant John Herbert Brereton Sewell from 5th Manchester Regiment, who introduced few years later to him new passion of his life – Scouting.

In late 1918 the war finally ended. One clause of the 11th November 1918 Armistice dealt with the matter of prisoner-of-war repatriation: “The immediate repatriation without reciprocity, according to detailed conditions which shall be fixed.” Overall, these prisoners were speedily repatriated. 

Henry was released from the prison camp on the 19th of November 1918 and he arrived back to England on the 29th of November 1918. At this time he gave his own address as 62 Old Dover Road, Canterbury, Kent.

He relinquished his rank Acting Captain on the 19th of March 1919 and left army service with the 4th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers on the 23rd of August 1920.

After the war Henry returned back to teaching and he became Co-Principal at Chafyn Grove School, Salisbury from 1920 onwards.

During these years, he coached the school rugby team and produced the annual school play. In school his nickname was Slush (what he did not like).

Four years after he was liberated from the Prisoner of War camp, he met his friend again with whom he was a POW with – John H.B. Sewell was invited to join the staff of Chafyn Grove School. Henry himself, had never been a Scout, but he and his twin brother had in their youth frequently been on camping holidays together. Sewell, who was already District Commissioner for Stockport, quickly enthused him with the ideals and challenge of the movement.
John H.B. Sewell remained at the school until 1931 from then onwards Letchworth was in full time charge of the 16th Salisbury (Chafyn Grove School) Scout Group.
At the annual Scout Camp, he was known as Chippi - this name he didn’t mind and which probably dated back to the war.

When the Second World War broke out he was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant on the 25th of November 1942 (Extract from London Gazette 11.06.1943). On 25th of May 1944 he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant (Extract from War Office Orders 21.09.1944).

He served with the Army Cadet Force, (personal number P275884/1) and rose to the rank of Major when he was appointed as an Officer to the 7th Cadet Battalion, Wiltshire A.C.7.

Henry resigned on 30th April 1945 from that position and on the 29th of May he relinquished his commission.

His main passion all of his life had been teaching and Scouting, after he joined  the Scouts Organisation in 1923, he remained active with them for forty years.
His great capability in Training Scouters was soon recognised and in 1928 he became Assistant County Commissioner (Training), and was subsequently active in arranging courses for Scouters. In addition he took on the job of D.C. South Wilts in 1938, remaining there for ten years. He carried much of the burden of maintaining Scouting in the County as well as District during the 1939-1945.
On returning from his County position in 1954 he became a Deputy Camp Chief attached to Gilwell Park, a rare distinction.

Papers indicate that he lived at this time at 12 Bourne Avenue, Salisbury. It is an old Victorian house and nowadays it is a nursing home.

Further details about him show that he did a bit travelling after the war with the Scouting. In the summer of 1955 he went to New York on SS Queen Elizabeth and arrived back in September from Canada on SS Saxonia. He visited the 8th World Scouts Jamboree at Niagra-on-Lake, Canada during 18-28 August.

Henry Murray Letchworth died on December 1964 after a short illness. He was 75 years of age. His death is registered England & Wales, Death Index 1916-2005 role as October-December 1964, Salisbury district, Wiltshire (Volume 7c, page 531). 

For his service during First World War as a Royal Dublin Fusiliers officer, Captain Henry Murray Letchworth was award the Victory Medal and British War Medal (he applied for his medals on the 3rd of April 1921), however in regards his World War Two medal entitlement at this point it is impossible to confirm if he did receive any awards (Defence Medal and/or War Medal) 

For his devotion and hard work for Scouting Organisation, “Chippi” received during the Second World War the highest award presented by The Scout Association “for services of the most exceptional character” – The Silver Wolf Award. This award in 1922 was an award for Adult volunteers for Services to Scouting and awarded only by the Chief Scout of the World.

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Edited by Noor

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Very very nice.  I had a mate, years ago, who was a fanatical DF collector and would literally drool over these!  He wore and 'Old Bill' moustache and, in the winter, an ankle length buffalo robe coat with a fur cap atop, adorned with a DF cap badge.  Quite the sight roaming the streets of Toronto in the 1980s!  He eventually moved north where, I gather, he rides his horse into town in a Confederate States cavalry uniform to collect his mail.

So, easy on the Guinnes, Noor!  It plus DF badges apparently have a strange long term effect on the brain! ;)

 

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My yesterdays pick-up. I am very pleased with this QSA (still researching his personal life):

W. Brown (1873 – xxxx)
4352, Private, 1st Battalion (mounted infantry)
Royal Dublin Fusiliers

William Born was born in St.Mary’s parish in Cork around 1873.
William joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers at Naas depot 9th February 1892. At that time he was 19 years old. Medical examination showed that he was 5 feet and 9 inches tall and weigh 133 pounds.
On the 8th April same year he was posted to 1st Battalion. Private Brown had some problems at that time – on the 23 November 1893 he was awaiting a trial and he was convicted for thief on 18th January 1894. Hi service continued after 120 days punishment on the 18th May 1894.

He served in Ireland until 1st May 1896. After that he was sent to South Africa where he staid following year till 1897. However, he must been a good soldier because 18th May 1896 he received a Good Conduct Badge.
He must be part of 1st Battalion Mounted Infantry unit because when Ndebele people rose up against the rule of the British South Africa Company during Second Matableland War (also known as the Matableland Rebellion) and the group comprised of 31 men under the command of Captain Alexander john Godley (later a general and commander of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force) and Captain Arthur Forde Pilson where put together and sent as a part of British troops to Rhodesia.
War broke out on 17 June 1896 at Mazowe with an attack by the Hwata dynasty on Alice Mine. This was followed by the medium Nehanda Nyakasikana capturing and executing Mazowe Native Commissioner Pollard.
With the war in Matabeleland ending, Gen. Carrington was able to concentrate his forces on Mashonaland and the rebels retreated into granite kopjes. With no central command to oppose him, Carrington was able to bring Maxim guns against each stronghold in turn, until resistance ended. 
Just 33 of British South Africa Company medals were awarded to members of the column from Royal Dublin Fusiliers in recognition of their services in operations during the Second Matableland. One of them was as well Private Brown.
William Brown was elected to come under new regulations on messing allowances under the provisions of Royal Warrant dated 31 March 1898. He received 2nd Good Conduct Badge on 18th May 1898.On the 9th February 1899 he was sent to Army Reserve.
His civil life didn’t last long because he was mobilized again under special army order of 7th October 1899. On the 10th November 1899 he was once again on the way back to South Africa.
He stayed in South Africa during whole Boer war until 2nd February 1902. After that he was still with the colours extra 2 years and was demobilised on the 8th February 1904, after 12 years of service.
During his time in the war he took part of operations and battles in Laing’s Nek between 2 and 9 June 1900, operations during the Relief of Ladysmith between 15 December 1899 and 28 February 1900. 

Based on his papers William’s father lived 195 Blarney Street, Cork.
Awards:
-    British South Africa Company Medal (Rhodes 1896 type).
-    Queen South Africa Medal
-    King South Africa Medal


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